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St Allie

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This thread is just for people to make a quick note on what they are cooking for dinner.

just make a quick note.. and if someone is intrigued and wants the recipe.. please post it.

There are some here, such as Smurfe (Steve, Wade, administration) who will also post a photo of the finished dish too. And will sometimes mention plating techniques.. just in case anyone is also serving meals for guests.

Some foods are regional.. I have a no fail, fantastic recipe, for roast leg of lamb.

'meat and three veg' on a plate, is the norm.. let's break out of that.. and share some good no fail recipes that are regional.

Of course..please list your wine/beer/favourite beverage to serve with your meal.

Allie
:bt
 

arcticsid

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Thanks G, I have been a professional cook for quite a few years, and am far better than that then winemaking, though I am trying hard to learn what I need to know to brew my own with the same results I get from my cooking.

I am envious you have the availability for lamb. I cooked up a nice leg a few Christmases ago and stuffed it with fresh rosemary, etc. I served it with a wild mushroom sauce. Thats all fine and good, but lamb here is pretty expensive. That leg of lamb costed me almost $60US (it actually came from NZ):D It fed of us (4 ppl) and there wasn't any leftovers. :slp

I don't know anything about pairing wines etc., but, I do have alot of recipes and techniques I would love to share. I realize this is a wine making forum, but we are all friends and it would be a pleasure to hear what some of the others have made. I for one, would love to hear how you do your lamb.

I have a great recipe for Greek Salad Dressing that starts with a base of Italian Dressing and then adds kalamata nand green olives, feta cheese, pepperoncinis, fresh basil etc. If anyone is interested in that, I would love to tell you how I do it.

I hope we can all share our recipes with each other. Perhaps we could include a section for "members recipes". Sounds like we all love to eat and cook as much as we enjoy making our own "brew"

Troy
:tz

(not sure why, but I love the TAZ emoticon)
 

St Allie

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Troy,

yesterday I made a $7 pork roast. ( I'm feeding 6 people)

this thread is about making a meal from what you have managed to get as a seasonal cheap meat or vegetable.. or hunting.. understand?

it's everyday food, for everyday families.

Allie
 

arcticsid

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Chicken Parmesan

One of my all time foods I love to make is chicken parm. This can also be done with beef, pork, or ostrich.

I actually have chix thawing right now to make it this weekend.

Chix breasts work best but I like the thighs, its easy to remove that lil bone in there.

Place the meat between two pieces of plastic wrap, (easier to clean up and no "splatter")

Don't beat the hell out of it, all you want to do is break it down a bit and start with a even piece of meat.

Flour, buttermilk eggwash, breading. I like to add a bit of Italian seasoning and parm cheese to my breading. Bread your meat and set aside.

Actually, make this sauce first. I start with tomato paste and a little water, easier to keep it thick. If you started with whole tomatoes, or tomatoe sauce you need allow time for it to thicken. This sauce is nothing more than canned toms( sorry Tom) and whatever spices you like. I just normally add onion, garlic, and Italian Seasoning.

Fry in a pan, or deep fry your meat. Just for a second or so, the fibers have been broken down, so it is going to cook pretty fast.

Allow it to drain for a second, top it with a little sauce, sprinkle with parm cheese, as much as you like, and then cover with a slice or two of mozzerella cheese. Pp in the oven, or under a broiler till the Mozz starts to bubble and turn brown, just a lil brown.

Done deal.

I love to serve this with Fetticine, but you favorite pasta will work just fine.

Take the hot pasta, toss it in a bowl with just a shot of cream, salt, pepper, a touch of the Ital Seasoning, and a bit,(or alot) of garlic.

Serve it with a few chunks of Garlic bread and your favorite vegetable and it is a cheap meal that will go a long ways.

I have sold this as a sandwihich on a nice piece of crusty bread, it has never failed.

Troy
:b
:tz
 

St Allie

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I'm just an everyday cook Troy.

NZ Roast Lamb.

leg of lamb.. bone in.. I'm feeding 6 people..3 very hungry teens.. one non so hungry plus two adults.

grab your roasting dish.. don't oil. I usually buy a 2.5 to 3kilos leg roast. Rub roast with soy sauce all over. Then rub all over with a good dark sugar. Salt and pepper the roast. Cover the roast and cook for 15 mins at 230 C.

after 15 mins.. turn the roast and recover, cook another 15 mins.

turn over, down to 170C, uncover, cook for another 2 hours 15 max. Take out of oven and roll in cooking foil.. leave to rest 30 minutes before carving.

This roast will not be pink, it'll be perfectly cooked. Moist and well worth the 7 to 8 people you are cooking for. I't's a special occasion roast. Not an everyday roast.

that roast will cost 3 dollars meat per person.. ( US 1 dollar 50 per person)
 

arcticsid

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Tuna Burgers

This is my other cheap meal. ( I actually am an expert on eating cheap. I have more to offer but will leave it at this for now):D

Take one can of tuna, squeeze out the liquid, oil or water, add one egg and enough bread crumbs to hold it together, you could add onion or celery, or whatever, but mince it pretty fine.

Fry this in a little oil till crispy and melt some cheese on it.

This will make two nice size patties for less than $1US.

Use a few cans and bake it in a bread pan. Tuna loaf!

My other cheap meal is fried shrimp. Normally I can find 1 pound of shrimp for about $5US. Peel it. Flour, eggwash, breading. Freeze this on a sheet pan on wax paper. Deeep fry them. Done deal.

That one pound of shrimp now turned into twice its weight. This is more than enough to serve 3 or 4 ppl if you serve it with french fries or whatever.

Troy
:D
 

St Allie

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shrimp etc.. is exp here.

I make my own pasta and bread here..

you don't get cheaper than home made pasta and soup..

I refuse to drink homemade 18 per cent 'hooch" Troy.


Allie
 

arcticsid

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How about if I make it 12% and call it wine? LOL I love to talk about eating cheap and am looking forward to this thread. I grew up learning how to be (not poor), but if a person, especially like you with a family, a person can eat pretty cheap and still make everyone happy.

I sure hope some of the others will chime in and share their ideas.

Great thread G, I hope this isn't the end of it.

Troy
 

Wade E

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We dont eat steak much here but London broil is fairly cheap already and then it went on sale also and we had some company(My wifes Aunt) so I grilled it for a little bit while I sauteed some Portabella mushrooms that I also got on sale and pulled the steaks off the grill awhile they were just seared nicely and cut a pocket in them and stuffed them with the mushrooms and then covered them with Gorgonzola and baked them for another 20 minutes and then broiled them for 8 minutes. A side of garlic bread and cauliflower and we all were stuffed for $21. St Allie has me beat on price but thats still a decent price for 5 people and a treat! My wifes aunt spent more then that on just a few Canolies!
 

Old Philosopher

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This is about as cheap as it comes, and the kids love it.
I learned this over a campfire on many hunting trips. I call it Hunter's Potatoes.

  1. Brown a pound of ground meat (your choice) in a skillet. Remove and set aside.
  2. Slice enough potatoes to feed your crew, thin, 1/4" to 1/8". Add some oil or lard (bear grease is fantastic!), and put over medium heat.
  3. Slice a couple onions the same as the potatoes. Add to skillet.
  4. Season liberally with Seasoned Salt and pepper.
  5. Cover with lid or foil to steam for several minutes to pre-cook potatoes.
  6. Don't rush stirring the pot. You want the potatoes to brown, and the onions translucent.
  7. When the potatoes are golden brown, toss the meat back in the skillet, to re-heat.

Very filling.

(Variation: Shred some cheddar cheese and sprinkle it over the mess when it's nearly done. Whip up a half dozen eggs in a bowl and pour over the cheese. Toss until the eggs are no longer runny.)

I'm just guessing, but this is a good way to feed 4-5 hungry adults for about $5 USD.
 

Old Philosopher

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Comment on this subject

I have a hard time putting a "cost per meal" tag on anything I might contribute. We gather our own eggs, butcher our own chickens/turkeys/ducks, and hunt for our meat. A lot of our veggies are home-grown. So...I can only guess at store prices.
Smart shopping is the key, though. Back in the day, with three small kids, my wife was able to feed a family of 5, very well, on about $300 per month. I knew couples with no kids that spent $600 a month!

Okay...here's another idea for frugal meals: fritata.
A fritata is basically a quiche for people who think quiches are for sissies.
You crack and gently whip enough eggs to fill your frying pan. I use cast iron for reasons which will become obvious.
Cut up anything you want to get rid of in the fridge, and anything else you know the family might eat. Green beans, any kind of meat, whole corn...just make sure there's more egg than "stuff". Stir all your goodies into the eggs mixture.
Throw it in the oven (hence the cast iron) on the top rack at 350 degrees until the eggs are set, browned on top, and hopefully not burned on the bottom. Cut it into wedges to serve. Happy customers and an empty fridge.
 
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St Allie

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My father always costed out the price of meals.. including the time you had the oven/stove on for too.

It was a challenge for him. Basically your stove and your hot water cylinder in the house is the biggest user of power. He always covered our cylinder with spare blankets to keep the heat escaping to a minimum.

Allie
 

Old Philosopher

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My father always costed out the price of meals.. including the time you had the oven/stove on for too.

It was a challenge for him. Basically your stove and your hot water cylinder in the house is the biggest user of power. He always covered our cylinder with spare blankets to keep the heat escaping to a minimum.

Allie
Ouch! I guess you do what you gotta do to manage a household. I'm assuming he didn't allow a clothes dryer in the house, since that sucks up power second only to hot water.
In areas where it's available, natural gas for cooking and the water heater are the best deal going, so far. They even make gas clothes driers.
 

St Allie

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no, we never had a clothes dryer.

Ask most people nowadays where their powers costs are in a household.. and they won't be able to tell you.

We use the BBQ a lot in summer.. it saves having the oven/stove on at all.

There is also a local BBQ that the council maintains.. so if you walk down there with your family and dinner.. you cook dinner for nothing..

Allie
 

Old Philosopher

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no, we never had a clothes dryer.

Ask most people nowadays where their powers costs are in a household.. and they won't be able to tell you.

We use the BBQ a lot in summer.. it saves having the oven/stove on at all.

There is also a local BBQ that the council maintains.. so if you walk down there with your family and dinner.. you cook dinner for nothing..

Allie
I'm beginning to realize I don't have a clue as to your living arrangements and life style over there. :h
We put about 50,000 miles a year on our gas BBQ. That doesn't count the smoked dinners in the charcoal kettle BBQ. Ever since I got a rotisserie and basket for the 'Q, the moths have taken over the oven. :)
Love those carcinogens! NOTHING compares to pork over an open flame!
 

St Allie

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We dont eat steak much here but London broil is fairly cheap already and then it went on sale also and we had some company(My wifes Aunt) so I grilled it for a little bit while I sauteed some Portabella mushrooms that I also got on sale and pulled the steaks off the grill awhile they were just seared nicely and cut a pocket in them and stuffed them with the mushrooms and then covered them with Gorgonzola and baked them for another 20 minutes and then broiled them for 8 minutes. A side of garlic bread and cauliflower and we all were stuffed for $21. St Allie has me beat on price but thats still a decent price for 5 people and a treat! My wifes aunt spent more then that on just a few Canolies!
heheheh Wade.. I'm pretty good at stretching a dollar!

What exactly is "london broil"?

:D
 

Old Philosopher

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heheheh Wade.. I'm pretty good at stretching a dollar!

What exactly is "london broil"?

:D
Wade might be out for the night. London Broil is flank or round steak, marinaded, grilled and cut thin across the grain.
 

St Allie

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I'm beginning to realize I don't have a clue as to your living arrangements and life style over there. :h
We put about 50,000 miles a year on our gas BBQ. That doesn't count the smoked dinners in the charcoal kettle BBQ. Ever since I got a rotisserie and basket for the 'Q, the moths have taken over the oven. :)
Love those carcinogens! NOTHING compares to pork over an open flame!
We're pretty easy going and down to earth here..

Auckland is a very mild climate.. no snow and winter temps rarely dip below freezing.. we get maybe 7-10 frosts a year.

We are never more than an hour from the coast.. so fishing/surfing etc is big here. Most people own a boat.. this is why Auckland is called "the city of sails"..

Considering we have fish/beef and lamb on the doorstep.. it's horrendously expensive to buy.

Chicken is the most cost effective meal here.

Allie
 

St Allie

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Wade might be out for the night. London Broil is flank or round steak, marinaded, grilled and cut thin across the grain.
Thankyou.. we call that 'skirt steak' it's a tougher meat with good flavour, we usually casserole/ slow cooker it.

have never seen it cooked the way Wade does it.. I'm going to try that next time I see it on special.

Allie
 

Old Philosopher

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Thankyou.. we call that 'skirt steak' it's a tougher meat with good flavour, we usually casserole/ slow cooker it.

have never seen it cooked the way Wade does it.. I'm going to try that next time I see it on special.

Allie
I've never done the "London Broil" thing with a flank (skirt) steak. To me, London Broil is basically 1/2 of a round steak, usually the "bottom round", and cut 1 1/2" to even 3" thick. The full round steak, cut 2"-3" thick is called a Baron of Beef. Absolutely fantastic, and very impressive to throw a 6 pound steak on the barbee for company! :D
 

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