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"Juicers"?

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Rocknrandyc

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Ok how about using a "Juicer" on fresh fruit (Pears, Apples, papayas, mangos, plums etc) to use in a wine recipe. Who has tried this? IF. for example, a recipe calls for 6 lbs of pears, can I juice the 6 lbs and follow the recipe? Do i peel fruit prior to "juicing"? Are some fruits better used chopped instead of juiced? Any feedback will be appreciated!
 

arcticsid

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Hey Rock, go to the search button above and type in juicers. I actually started a thread on this a couple weeks back and got some great feed back. Alot of the members would recommend taking the fruit, cut up and froze first to break it down a bit. But that is your decision. Take a look at the search, not google, but lots of info in there. Can't find it come on back , we'll try to answer.
Troy
 

arcticsid

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while youre in the search type in frozen fruit, you'll get some good info on that also.
Troy
 

Benjo's Mom

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My juicer is ancient and I can't imagine trying to get enough juice for wine. I had very good luck however pureeing fruit in the blender (raspberries and rhubarb) and then placing it in a bag I purchased at a brew supply shop. I believe someone here mentioned a new pair of pantyhose will do the trick as well. It needs to be squeezed gently to get the fruit juice out, but with the right kinds of fruit, it has worked well for me.
 

arcticsid

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Here we go again with the nylons!!

Hi Mom, good to see you again. Alot of the members agree nylons work fantastic for a fermenting bag, and your method of puree in a blender sounds perfect.

The only trouble with nylons is that they need to match your eye color:)
Troy
 

jbullard1

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I have a blueberry started loosly based on Jack Keller's full body recipe
I pureed the berry's and added all the ingredients in a primary
Racked 6 days later into a secondary by pouring through a cheesecloth strainer
It's still slowly working and will be racked again soon :D
 

arcticsid

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Afraid to buy nylons are ya? I still have Wisconsin blood in me, we use cheesecloth, for, well, cheese. Nyylons are made for making wine. Thats what I heard anyway.:D
 

jbullard1

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Afraid to buy nylons are ya? I still have Wisconsin blood in me, we use cheesecloth, for, well, cheese. Nyylons are made for making wine. Thats what I heard anyway.:D

Nope just saving the nylons for the finer pulped fruits
and besides Cheesecloth is 2.00 bucks a yard and nylons $3.00 a pair
 

arcticsid

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I looked at nylons a couple weeks back, 8-12 dollars a pair. YIKES, I did find some decent fermenter bags at the local homebrew supply shop cheaper. But, it is afterall, fun to talk about nylons and winemaking. Wine and nylons sound better, but who am I to judge?
 

halifaxwino

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because the nylons are died or dyed with color, do u have to wash them first or do something?
 

Luc

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Ok how about using a "Juicer" on fresh fruit (Pears, Apples, papayas, mangos, plums etc) to use in a wine recipe. Who has tried this? IF. for example, a recipe calls for 6 lbs of pears, can I juice the 6 lbs and follow the recipe? Do i peel fruit prior to "juicing"? Are some fruits better used chopped instead of juiced? Any feedback will be appreciated!
There is actually a difference between the methods that is really significant.

When you juice the fruit you have juice (hehe) and pulp.

The pulp is still full of sugar, color, nutrients, flavor, tannins etc etc etc. And you do not do anything with it.

When you mash the fruit up, pour water over it and soak it
all the goodies will also be dissolved in the water.

Look at it this way.

They juice grapes (with a press) for making a white wine.
They ferment on the pulp for making a red wine.....

So I presume you need more fruit to get the same reults when juicing in stead of pulp fermenting.

Luc
 

Boozehag

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Ahhh I was going to ask about juicers as I have one as well. I will check out the other thread on juicers you mentioned Troy but just wanted to mention that nylons are only a couple dollars here if you dont want to wear them (The nice ones are expensive!) lol

Also that I made some strainer bags out of a fine nylon material which work really well...cost me nothing as I already had the material.

Id like to use the juicer though.

Luc do you mean that even if you do use the juicer, you should add the pulp (In a bag or whatever.) to make sure you get everything out? Would this defeat the puropse of using the juicer?
 

St Allie

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I use a juicer for cider. ferment out on the juice with a cider yeast

only add sulphite,citric acid, pectic enzyme and yeast.

Very simple, no water or sugar, finishes dry and still at about 7%.

when juicing put the dry left over pulp and the juice into a container with a tap..with citric acid or lemon juice to reduce browning. just put everything in..leave 24 hours with pectic enzyme.. then put into carboys avoiding the foam from the container.

add yeast to ferment out as usual.

Allie
 
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