Recommended Apple Spice Wine Recipe?

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Bill W

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I'm already looking at my next batch as I'm setting up to bottle the strawberry. I'm looking for a nice apple spice wine that I can mildly backsweeten, that would make a real nice autumn kind of wine, that we can drink next year. Wade, got any winners?
 

St Allie

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I have a tried and true apple wine recipe, in the recipe section.

It can be made into a holiday mulled wine or you can spice that to your own taste.

Allie
 

Madriver Wines

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I made a spiced apple and if you use cloves only leave them in for a day or 2 at most. They dominate the flavor bog time. Leave the cinnamon stick in for a long time as it is just the opposite. It is a regular apple recipe and I added the cloves in a tea bag stapled shut. Just threw the cinnamon stick in and let it float around.
 

Wade E

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I have made 1 and it went like this.

6 gallons of pressed apple juice
7 lbs of brown sugar
3 lbs of chopped raisins
pectic enzyme to manufacturers specs
6 tsp of yeast nutrient
3 tsp of yeast energizer
6 campden tablets
4 tsp of acid blend
6 cinnamon sticks
4 cloves
1 package of mullng spice
 

Russ Stewart

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How did you like the result of this recipe, Wade? Did it taste more like mulled cider or did it have a distinctive spiced wine flavor to it?
 

Wade E

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Of Mulling spice (typo)
I thought it was excellent and as soon as the fresh apple juice is in season Ill make another batch. It was more of a wine with a nice hint of spice, its just a small packet of spices usually designed for a 1 gallon so using it for 6 gallons just gaveit a nice hint.
 

alexdavid

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Davids

Hello everybody,

6 gallons of pressed apple juice
7 lbs of brown sugar
3 lbs of chopped raisins
pectic enzyme to manufacturers specs
6 tsp of yeast nutrient
3 tsp of yeast energizer
6 campden tablets
4 tsp of acid blend
6 cinnamon sticks
4 cloves
1 package of mullng spice
.............................................................................................
But you did not write its recipe
 

Jalin77

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Hi
Apple Spice Wine Recipe is for you ...Try and enjoy ...
* 1 gallon pure apple juice ,
* 1 lb. granuated sugar,
* 1-1/2 tsp. acid blend,
* 1/2 tsp. pectic enzyme,
* 1/4 tsp tannin,,
* 1 crushed Campden tablet,
* Champagne yeast and nutrient .

Put juice, sugar, crushed Campden tablet, pectic enzyme, acid blend, and tannin into primary fermentation vessel. Stir vigorously to dissolve solids and cover. After 24 hours, add yeast and nutrient and cover. Stir daily. When S.G. reaches 1.040 (3-5 days), rack into secondary fermentation vessel and fit airlock. Rack again after 30 days and again after two months. When wine is clear, rack again and bottle. Taste after six months...
 

UglyBhamGuy

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When does the spice get added?
Primary? Secondary? During bulk aging?
 

Woodbee

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I put my spices in the strainer bag and remove after 5-7 days. I like cinnamon sticks, crushed ginger root and sliced whole oranges and just a few whole cloves.
Brad
 
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I have made 1 and it went like this.

6 gallons of pressed apple juice
7 lbs of brown sugar
3 lbs of chopped raisins
pectic enzyme to manufacturers specs
6 tsp of yeast nutrient
3 tsp of yeast energizer
6 campden tablets
4 tsp of acid blend
6 cinnamon sticks
4 cloves
1 package of mullng spice
can you give me the instructions please
 

cmason1957

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can you give me the instructions please
I see that this is your very first post. I doubt anyone from the original group will answer you. This message is about 10 years old.

Now to answer to question, I am guessing you have never made wine before. An Apple wine might not be the best place to start, as the apples take some extra care to make sure you don't end up with a cloudy wine. I almost always suggest that folks consider starting by purchasing the equipment you need, local home brew shops have equipment kits for purchase at about the same price as if I were to list everything and you buy it piece by piece. Cost for 6 gallon equipment is $100-200. I always make 6 gallon size batches, same amount of work as 1 gallon, but 30 bottles at the end, instead of 5. Next I suggest folks but the cheapest wine kit the stores sell that come with everything required, except for bottles (and sometimes no corks) wine kits come with full step by step instructions, follow them for the first kit instructions. Let it agree for a month after bottling, then start drinking.

Once you know what things you have to do, you are ready for recipes.
 

G259

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I started with 1 gallon batches, I wanted to make my mistakes smaller! I gravitate to 3 gal. batches with Better Bottles.
 

BernardSmith

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While I agree that trying to resurrect a thread that is 10 years old is a lot like trying to waken a zombie... I am not sure I agree that making an apple wine is a challenge for a beginner. Not least because with care it is easy to locate gallon jugs of sweet cider (unfiltered) or apple juice (filtered) that do not contain sorbates or any chemical to inhibit fermentation and making (hard) cider (around 5-7% alcohol by volume) or an apple wine (an abv of around 10-12%) is not so hard.

Note that neither of the two "recipes" below involve "apple spice". To trasform them into "apple spice" you might simply add some spices used to make mulled cider. I would use the same quantity of spice mix as recommended.

Make sure that it has no "preservatives", remove a cup of the juice; add (pitch) a full pack of yeast, cover the mouth of the jug with some cloth and wait a couple of weeks and you have hard cider.
If you want a hill billy wine- remove about 3 cups of the juice and add some sugar (about 1 lb) stir to dissolve (could be table sugar, could be brown sugar - could even be a pound of honey). If there is enough room add back some of the juice you removed to allow for space for one more cup: you want the headroom because the wine will foam and froth), pitch a pack of yeast and cover the mouth loosely with a cloth.
After about two or three weeks (and if you get yourself an hydrometer you use that to determine the next step and not your calendar) or when the density of the cider or wine has dropped to 1.000 you transfer the wine from this container into a similar sized and shaped vessel to which you "seal" with a rubber or silicone bung and airlock. and you let this quietly age for a few months. The best way to transfer the wine is with a siphon because this reduces the amount of oxygen the wine picks up (and oxygen will act to "rust" the wine - (it spoils the flavor and damages the color). But at this point you can drink the cider /wine, though it WILL taste better if you allow it to age.

All of the above is a very basic lesson in wine making. But as in everything - having the right tools, the best ingredients and developing the right skills will result in a better finished product.
 
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hounddawg

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While I agree that trying to resurrect a thread that is 10 years old is a lot like trying to waken a zombie... I am not sure I agree that making an apple wine is a challenge for a beginner. Not least because with care it is easy to locate gallon jugs of sweet cider (unfiltered) or apple juice (filtered) that do not contain sorbates or any chemical to inhibit fermentation and making (hard) cider (around 5-7% alcohol by volume) or an apple wine (an abv of around 10-12%) is not so hard.

Note that neither of the two "recipes" below involve "apple spice". To trasform them into "apple spice" you might simply add some spices used to make mulled cider. I would use the same quantity of spice mix as recommended.

Make sure that it has no "preservatives", remove a cup of the juice; add (pitch) a full pack of yeast, cover the mouth of the jug with some cloth and wait a couple of weeks and you have hard cider.
If you want a hill billy wine- remove about 3 cups of the juice and add some sugar (about 1 lb) stir to dissolve (could be table sugar, could be brown sugar - could even be a pound of honey). If there is enough room add back some of the juice you removed to allow for space for one more cup: you want the headroom because the wine will foam and froth), pitch a pack of yeast and cover the mouth loosely with a cloth.
After about two or three weeks (and if you get yourself an hydrometer you use that to determine the next step and not your calendar) or when the density of the cider or wine has dropped to 1.000 you transfer the wine from this container into a similar sized and shaped vessel to which you "seal" with a rubber or silicone bung and airlock. and you let this quietly age for a few months. The best way to transfer the wine is with a siphon because this reduces the amount of oxygen the wine picks up (and oxygen will act to "rust" the wine - (it spoils the flavor and damages the color). But at this point you can drink the cider /wine, though it WILL taste better if you allow it to age.

All of the above is a very basic lesson in wine making. But as in everything - having the right tools, the best ingredients and developing the right skills will result in a better finished product.
hum,,, BenardSmith if i had feelings they might of been hurt with the way hillbilly was used, but being an old hillbilly,,, i aint, lol.
Dawg
 

hounddawg

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can you give me the instructions please
apple, pear, pineapple, all take for me anyways a couple years to clear, but do taste great, as long as you are patient, there is a forum dedicated to recipes, that will help you, i have never made a kit nor a grape wine, so if you wish, check out the recipe forum, the beginner forum and the country wine forum, and it would help you along greatly to check out the common terms thread, and yes a hydrometer will help you, as you learn you can accumulate more tools , carboys, jugs and bungs, airlocks, as stated above by others it is as easy to go with 6 gallon as it is 1 gallon, as for me i usually ferment 7 or 7 &1/2 gallons, so when i rack my first time from primary (fermenting container an/or barrel/bucket to carboy/jug that can be airlocked for aging to allow for degassing and clearing, some use fining agents to speed up clearing times like for instance super kleer, you can post in the beginners forum and ask all you wish, in order to learn, i keep smaller jugs and bottles so each time i rack i top off with the same as i am making, sorry if i rambled, had to take a couple glucose tablets my sugar crashed ,(diabetic) Best of Luck and Welcome mistysweeney78 ,
Dawg
 

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