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vinny

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Good day all.

I finally got the recipe for the Irish Stout I was given to try. It is a brew in a bag, and I have no clue, so I just wanted to make sure I am on track.

I am assuming that I want to take the mash ingredients in a bag and 8 gallons of water and boil for 90 minutes, adding the whirlfloc in the last 15 minutes. Aim for SG of 1.038, cool and pitch yeast. Ferment and transfer to secondary. Age 30 days and add corn sugar to full batch and bottle?

The only thing I am not really getting is the saccharafication measurements and mash out temps and times.

Any clarification and or correction is appreciated!


beer.pngbeer2.png


◯ Date Bottled/Kegged: 06 Aug 2022 - Carbonation: Bottle with 3.61 oz Corn Sugar
◯ Age beer for 30.00 days at 65.0 F
◯ 05 Sep 2022 - Drink
 
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You don’t boil the grain for 90 minutes.

You heat the first amount of water 39.25 liters to 157 degrees and pour over the grains. Let that steep at a constant temperature for 75 min. Then heat the water and grains to 168 degrees over a period of 7 minutes and hold for 10, I think. Then remove the grain bag. Let drain. You boil the liquid for 90 min with the hops. At least that is the best I can understand. Never boil the grains.

Hope that helps. I make beer but the directions for this assume a lot. Assume way too much for a beginner.
 
Sorry, worked late...

Dave, I've never done the brew in bag, what I do is add about 1 1/4 qts of water to each pound of grain, bring the temp up to scarification temp in a large brew pot (around 150-152*F for a stout), hold until the starches convert to sugar (45 minutes to 1 1/4 hours in an igloo cooler), then bring the mash (which it is called) up to about 165*F to deactivate the enzymes that convert the starches to sugar (usually a form of an amylase), then sparge (run hot water through a false bottom lauter tun) the grains to extract the sugar from them until the SG drops to about 1.010 or so (if you oversparge you'll extract things that add astringency from the grain husks).

Then I boil what I gather for usually 1 - 1 1/2 hours at a larger volume than you want to end up with due to boil evaporation, adding bittering and flavor hops by the schedule in the recipe (I have a program that helps figure out the IBU's I should end up with). Cool as fast as possible, covered (usually with a wort chiller) then pitch the yeast and keep covered and under airlock unlike a batch of wine that can be fermented in an open fermenter.

I think the brew in bag acts more like a big lauter tun and you steep the grains to scarify the starches and steep out the sugars. There are plenty of good books and youtube videos that can help you through the process... I'll try to look for some tonight and post here if possible.

Edit: FYI, I'd use more pale malt and cut the flaked barley back to 1 lb or so. I'd go up to 6.5 to 7 lbs of pale malt minimum, unless you want a really thin stout. I'd also cut the black malt back to 1/2 pound, that stuff really adds a bitterness that might overwhelm the brew. I'll look for the Guinness knock off I've made many times before and post it here.
 
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Sorry, worked late...

Dave, I've never done the brew in bag, what I do is add about 1 1/4 qts of water to each pound of grain, bring the temp up to scarification temp in a large brew pot (around 150-152*F for a stout), hold until the starches convert to sugar (45 minutes to 1 1/4 hours in an igloo cooler), then bring the mash (which it is called) up to about 165*F to deactivate the enzymes that convert the starches to sugar (usually a form of an amylase), then sparge (run hot water through a false bottom lauter tun) the grains to extract the sugar from them until the SG drops to about 1.010 or so (if you oversparge you'll extract things that add astringency from the grain husks).

Then I boil what I gather for usually 1 - 1 1/2 hours at a larger volume than you want to end up with due to boil evaporation, adding bittering and flavor hops by the schedule in the recipe (I have a program that helps figure out the IBU's I should end up with). Cool as fast as possible, covered (usually with a wort chiller) then pitch the yeast and keep covered and under airlock unlike a batch of wine that can be fermented in an open fermenter.

I think the brew in bag acts more like a big lauter tun and you steep the grains to scarify the starches and steep out the sugars. There are plenty of good books and youtube videos that can help you through the process... I'll try to look for some tonight and post here if possible.

Edit: FYI, I'd use more pale malt and cut the flaked barley back to 1 lb or so. I'd go up to 6.5 to 7 lbs of pale malt minimum, unless you want a really thin stout.
My LHBS shop has bulk grains so I am sure they can give me some advice. I bought a plate chiller so I can cool it, I just don't have a 5 gallon carboy. I guess I am off to school so I can figure out what I need.
 
My LHBS shop has bulk grains so I am sure they can give me some advice. I bought a plate chiller so I can cool it, I just don't have a 5 gallon carboy. I guess I am off to school so I can figure out what I need.
You can actually use a brew bucket or a Speidel type fermenter, just so you can airlock it. It will have, and must have, plenty of open room on top for the kraeusen to develop (it will on top of the beer) as it ferments. You don't need to worry about excess air space until it's done fermenting. At that point you will be racking it to a smaller vessel.

Best advice I've learned. More clean = better beer. Less alcohol in the beer than wine to protect it from nasties that love to spoil it. Less in the beginning = less in the finished product.
 
Funny you brought all this up, I'm about to research making a beer for my nephew as a wedding present (get married at the end of July). I just realized the recipes I have are all on my old decommissioned PC, I think I need to resurrect those in the next few days before they get lost. I lost 150+ recipes I had made losing a hard drive back in the early 2000s (been making beer since 1990).

This recipe is from Zymurgy V21 N1, Spring 1998 and I'm sure I modelled my recipe after this one. Only main difference was adding some soured beer that was then boiled. The article is Guinness' Darkest Secrets, lol.
For 5 gallons (US gallons):
7 lbs Briess pale ale malt (I probably used Maris Otter from England)
1 lb roasted unmalted barley
1 lb flaked barley
.5 lb 80 L (lovibond) crystal malt
2 oz black patent malt (probably used 4 oz, for some reason I remember that tweak)
1.5 oz Northern brewer hops (which I hate, probably used 2-4 oz East Kent Goldings depending on the strength - IBUs in the low to mid 30's)

OG 1.052 (I'm guessing I got 1.046 to 1.048 by the amount of grains used)
FG 1.012
Primary ferment: 14 days @ 65 to 70*F (probably got done in 7 days - I usually use a liquid English Dry yeast from White Labs)
Secondary: 7 days (I normally keg in a corny keg and pressurize to 5 or so psi, let sit for a few days, bleed pressure off, repressurize to 3 psi)

I normally serve around 45*F, too cold and you miss out on the great malt flavors.

You can pressurize with nitrogen if you want to get fancy, low CO2 tastes good as well, just a little sharper than the nitrogen.
 
You don’t boil the grain for 90 minutes.

You heat the first amount of water 39.25 liters to 157 degrees and pour over the grains. Let that steep at a constant temperature for 75 min. Then heat the water and grains to 168 degrees over a period of 7 minutes and hold for 10, I think. Then remove the grain bag. Let drain. You boil the liquid for 90 min with the hops. At least that is the best I can understand. Never boil the grains.

Hope that helps. I make beer but the directions for this assume a lot. Assume way too much for a beginner.
I found another recipe with almost identical ingredients.

This one I can understand.

I am thinking of getting an airlock for my corny keg. It is my only 5 gallon option. I've got an old freezer I just need to get a controller to adjust the temperature. This has become a bit of a thing. 🙃

I have 2 corny kegs and CO2, is it a viable option to ferment in one and transfer to the other to carbonate?

Dry Irish Stout


Ingredients​


  • Marris Otter Pale Malt – 5.25 lbs
  • Flaked barley – 1.5 lbs
  • Roasted barley – 0.9 lbs
  • East Kent Golding hops – 1.25 oz
  • Yeast of your choice. Suggested: White Labs 007 Dry English Ale or White Labs 1098 Liquid British Ale

Instructions​


  1. Set up all-grain brewing equipment.
  2. Heat 2.5 gallons of water to 161°F
  3. Slowly add the Marris Otter pale malt, flaked barley and roasted barley to the heated water in the mash tun. Stir while adding.
  4. Mash at 150°F for 60 minutes.
  5. While mashing, bring 3 more gallons of water to 185°F.
  6. After 60 minutes, carefully pour the extra water into the mash. Stir.
  7. Collect 6 gallons of wort for the boil.
  8. Begin the 60-minute boil. Add the 1.25 oz of East Kent Golding hops.
  9. Cool the wort to pitching temperatures for chosen strain.
  10. Pitch yeast, and aerate thoroughly.
  11. Ferment 68-70°F for at least one week.
  12. Allow one week for settling.
  13. Bottle or keg as desired.
  14. Carbonate your beer.
    1. If bottling, prime your beer for bottle conditioning. Carbonation can take up to two weeks.
    2. If kegging, force carbonate.
      1. For a true Irish Stout experience, serve in a nitro dispense system.
  15. After carbonation is finished, enjoy!
 
Can you get a brewing bucket? They are usually cheap and 6 to 7 gallons. You'll need a couple of gallons of head space when fermenting or you will make a big mess on the floor. Only other thing I used was what is called a blow-off tube. It's like a siphon tube but as wide as the opening of the carboy. All the foam/yeast etc blows through the tube into a bucket with some kmeta solution or something of the sort to keep nasties from travelling back up the tube.

But, if it gets clogged, watch out! I cleaned my roof in the hallway once when it clogged when I was at work (in an apartment before I bought my house).

The White Labs 007 is what I've used, love that yeast!

I'd still add a pound more base malt if you can.
 
Can you get a brewing bucket? They are usually cheap and 6 to 7 gallons. You'll need a couple of gallons of head space when fermenting or you will make a big mess on the floor. Only other thing I used was what is called a blow-off tube. It's like a siphon tube but as wide as the opening of the carboy. All the foam/yeast etc blows through the tube into a bucket with some kmeta solution or something of the sort to keep nasties from travelling back up the tube.

But, if it gets clogged, watch out! I cleaned my roof in the hallway once when it clogged when I was at work (in an apartment before I bought my house).
i have 6.5 gallon buckets that I use for wine primaries. I can put an airlock in one. Corny keg a decent option for secondary?
 
i have 6.5 gallon buckets that I use for wine primaries. I can put an airlock in one. Corny keg a decent option for secondary?
Yes, the corny keg will be fine. You said you have a couple of them, you can rack after a couple of weeks so you don't have quite so much sediment in the bottom when you serve the beer. And yes, the 6.5 buckets would work as well, that's what I used until I got a 7 gallon Speidel fermenter (Speidel Plastic Fermenter | Round HDPE Storage Tank | 30L | 7.9 gal | MoreWine).
 
Agreed with Craig on the ingredients (and everything else). I did a porter last winter and the grains were: 8lb. 2 row, .8 crystal (60° L), .4 crystal (120° L), .5 chocolate. If I made it again I would probably go lighter on the chocolate and do black patent as mentioned above. Did traditional fuggles/goldings. It's 4:46 in California. All this beer talk just makes me want to head to the kitchen and call it a day.....
 
I found another recipe with almost identical ingredients.

This one I can understand.

I am thinking of getting an airlock for my corny keg. It is my only 5 gallon option. I've got an old freezer I just need to get a controller to adjust the temperature. This has become a bit of a thing. 🙃

I have 2 corny kegs and CO2, is it a viable option to ferment in one and transfer to the other to carbonate?

Dry Irish Stout


Ingredients​


  • Marris Otter Pale Malt – 5.25 lbs
  • Flaked barley – 1.5 lbs
  • Roasted barley – 0.9 lbs
  • East Kent Golding hops – 1.25 oz
  • Yeast of your choice. Suggested: White Labs 007 Dry English Ale or White Labs 1098 Liquid British Ale

Instructions​


  1. Set up all-grain brewing equipment.
  2. Heat 2.5 gallons of water to 161°F
  3. Slowly add the Marris Otter pale malt, flaked barley and roasted barley to the heated water in the mash tun. Stir while adding.
  4. Mash at 150°F for 60 minutes.
  5. While mashing, bring 3 more gallons of water to 185°F.
  6. After 60 minutes, carefully pour the extra water into the mash. Stir.
  7. Collect 6 gallons of wort for the boil.
  8. Begin the 60-minute boil. Add the 1.25 oz of East Kent Golding hops.
  9. Cool the wort to pitching temperatures for chosen strain.
  10. Pitch yeast, and aerate thoroughly.
  11. Ferment 68-70°F for at least one week.
  12. Allow one week for settling.
  13. Bottle or keg as desired.
  14. Carbonate your beer.
    1. If bottling, prime your beer for bottle conditioning. Carbonation can take up to two weeks.
    2. If kegging, force carbonate.
      1. For a true Irish Stout experience, serve in a nitro dispense system.
  15. After carbonation is finished, enjoy!
That step by step looks so much better. You have great advice from Craig. I will say you can either use a larger primary or a blow off tube or both!!

Do be clean; way more than with wine. Also keep to ferment temperatures constant. My beers were vastly improved by moving fermentation from the kitchen near the ovens and heat/ac to a bedroom with more stable temperatures.

Most of all, enjoy the journey. Beer and wine are similar but so different.
 
I didn't chime in as I'm a syrup brewer, not a grain brewer. Looked at the process, but I don't drink enough beer to make it worthwhile.

I just realized the recipes I have are all on my old decommissioned PC, I think I need to resurrect those in the next few days before they get lost. I lost 150+ recipes I had made losing a hard drive back in the early 2000s (been making beer since 1990).
This is a good case for a service such as Microsoft's OneDrive. If you have use for MS Office, $100/year gets you 6 licenses, each of which includes 1 TB of OneDrive space, which is a crazy amount for normal people. If your files are in OneDrive, your PC craps out, simply log into OneDrive from a new PC and you have all your files.

Note -- I put nothing on the net that I'd not want others to see. For personal files, such as financial records? These days DVD drives are deprecated, but burning backups to DVD is cheap, and finalized disks are ransomware-proof. I burn a copy of financial records every year after tax season.

Hardware failure is a "when", not an "if" ....

This service message has been brought to you by someone who had a failure without a recent backup. ;)
 
Along the same lines as Bryan says, I use the free 15 Gb that comes with having a google mail address, that's enough for me. If I wanted more I'd probably go with the Google Drive pricing. Nice thing is I can access those files straight from my phone, tablet, computer, heck just about anything. I also encourage DVD backups of really important stuff like tax records, I figure they will last at least that 7 years I have to keep records around for. I think I pay the $100 MS tax, for now, but probably when I get down to one computer in the house (yeah that'll never really happen, that's like only owning 10 carboys), I'll drop that and revert to free versions of similar products when it doesn't matter if I can read the latest spreadsheet macros.
 

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