Apple Cider $7.00 / Gallon

Discussion in 'Country Fruit Winemaking' started by Scooter68, Oct 30, 2018.

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  1. Oct 30, 2018 #1

    Scooter68

    Scooter68

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    Ok well I went to a local Fruit Orchard stand looking to score some apples. Instead of Apples (Various types/prices at from $24.00/bushel to $34.00/bushel (A little less for 2nds) I found Apple Cider at $7.00 a gallon.

    Frozen, Unfiltered, No preservatives. Only thing done was a flash heat (Not pasturized)

    Talked to owner and they took their apples to a place that presses and bottles their apples for them.

    Purchased 3 gallons and put them in my freezer until I'm ready to go.

    I've bought their Peaches (2nds) before

    Just saved me a lot of work. The cider is a mix of their various apples including Arkansas Black. Jonathan, Delicious and one other.

    Anyone in this area, if you are looking...
    Vanzant Fruit Farms
    3705 AR-264, Lowell, AR 72745 Between Springdale and Rogers Arkansas
    (479) 756-3152

    They take their Apples to Murphy Orchard I think. They are just southwest of Springfield MO if anyone is in that area and looking for some apples for wine. Arkansas Black are the latest apple they pick so that's good one for wine - a tart apple.
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2018
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  2. Oct 30, 2018 #2

    Johnd

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    Hey Scooter, why do you say that a tart apple is good for wine? I don't make much fruit wine, but I know that you do, and am curious why the tart is better. I've also read the same thing here for cherries if I recall correctly, why is tart better?
     
  3. Oct 30, 2018 #3

    Scooter68

    Scooter68

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    Seems that all the "Sources" I've read about making Apple wine suggested that the best flavor comes from the Tart Apples not the sweet apples. I think I remember something about 60/40 Tart/Sweet The basic reason seems to be the longevity of the flavor is lower when using sweet apples AND they don't have as much acid and tannin as tart apples. I had to re-research to answer your question so here's what I found and it seems my ration may be off a bit but...

    (Oh and I don't know what ratio of apple types went into the cider I bought today - going to wing on that and probably kick in some tannin and of course check the acid level.)

    I have also applied that to my Cherry wine. In that case going 3 - 1 (Tart - Sweet) Result there is a VERY tart wine but I like it. Will be doing a batch this winter more along a 2 - 1

    Here are some of the sources"

    Excerpt from: https://winemakermag.com/article/1513-make-hard-cider-apple-wine

    Apples come in three primary categories: Sweet, sharp, and a group called bittersweet, bittertart, or bittersharp. For the purpose of this article, I will reference this last style as bittersharp. When making apple wine, you can use a wide variety of apples to press juice or cider as you will ferment to dryness. However, cider makers pay close attention to the varieties of apples that they use — some even opting for single variety ciders. Very few apple varieties make good hard cider as a single variety, however, and typically the goal is to find a blend of apples to get a more complex flavor. Here is a general suggestion for what portion of cider should come from what type of apple.

    Sweet – 40 to 60%
    Sharp – 20 to 40%
    Bittersharp – 15% to 35%

    Sweet apples are typically not sweeter than other apple varieties, but they are low acid and low tannin, giving them a flavor perception of higher sweetness levels. These are also called “aromatic” apples. Common varieties are Red Delicious, Gala, Golden Delicious, Fuji, and Jonagold.

    Tart apples also have a normal sugar level, but they have a higher acid level, giving them a more “tart” overall flavor. Common varieties in this category are Honeycrisp, Gravenstein, Granny Smith, McIntosh, Northern Spy, Winesap, Rome, Empire, Braeburn, and Liberty."


    Excerpt from: http://grandmas-best-home-made-wine.com/apple-wine-recipe.html

    "I do want to say you will want to stick with the more tart apple varieties when you are making apple wine. McIntosh, Jonathan and Winesap apples are the best but any tart apple will work as will any combination of tart apples. You will want to stay away from the brand Delicious because of its low acid content. Just enjoy eating those ones... dipped in peanut butter is my favorite!



    Excerpt from: https://homebrewanswers.com/apple-wine-recipe/

    " Apples are one of the fruits that can be easily gathered around the beginning of autumn. There are countless trees not only in people’s gardens but also escapees that grow wild. The problem with a lot of these apple varieties that have grown free is the way the apples taste. Many wild apples can be bitter and sour. Whilst this means they aren’t all that good for eating the plus side is they are perfect for making wine.


    This apple wine recipe is very easy to do and if you can find a couple of trees near you then the fruit will be completely free. If at all possible you will be best served if you can find a mix of apples. Blending different varieties together will even out your wine and create a more complex finish.

    This wine recipe really is better with foraged apples which are usually more bitter, astringent and tart. If you have to use sweet eating apples then blend them in with other varieties such as crab apples or even cooking apples if possible

    AND Lastly our Old Friend Jack Keller's take on apples for wine: http://winemaking.jackkeller.net/recipes.asp

    • 24 lb. windfall apples, mixed varieties*
    • 3-6 lb. granulated sugar
    • 1 gallon water
    • 1 tsp. pectic enzyme
    • Sauterne wine yeast and nutrient

    Chop the apples into small pieces, put into primary fermentation vessel, add the pectic enzyme and water and cover the mixture. The water will not cover the apples, so stir several times a day to bring bottom apples to the top. After 24 hours, add the yeast and nutrient. Keep covered (a bath towel held fast with a large rubber band works well if the primary fermentation vessel doesn't have a lid) and in a warm place for 7-10 days. When the vigorous fermentation of the pulp subsides, strain the juice from the pulp and set aside, then press the juice from the pulp and add to the set-aside liquor. Measure and add 3 lb. sugar per gallon of liquor. Put into carboy or gallon secondary fermentation vessel and fit with airlock. Rack when clear, allow another 60 days, then rack again and bottle. Allow six months before tasting, one year for best results. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's First Steps in Winemaking]


    *For this and all apple wine recipes, unless varieties are specified, the more acid and sour varieties are preferred and the sweeter eating varieties are to be avoided. Winesap, McIntosh, Jonathans, and crab apples are best. Delicious apples should be avoided.
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2018
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  4. Oct 31, 2018 #4

    meadmaker1

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    Breathe dude
     
  5. Oct 31, 2018 #5

    meadmaker1

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    Tart apple leave tye typical green apple flavor that is easily detectable
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2018
  6. Oct 31, 2018 #6

    Scooter68

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    meadmaker1: "Tart apple leave tye typical green apple flavor tyat is easily detectable"

    That's not been my experience. But then I've been balancing the different apple types. Not where I want to be with them...yet. But getting close. Bottled a 1 gallon batch a month ago. Will start this next batch when I get a carboy available. (Or if I break down and buy another one.)
     
  7. Oct 31, 2018 #7

    Johnd

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    @Scooter68 Wow, sorry, didn’t mean to put you on to a mega research project, I was just picking your fruit wine brain!! Apple is a non grape wine that I think about making sometimes, but don’t have any real knowledge or experience with, I appreciate the effort you put into the answer.
     
  8. Oct 31, 2018 #8

    Scooter68

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    Not a problem - Hey, I'm retired, it was a rainy day and I wondered if I had remembered what I read correctly. I was close. 10 mins work to fetch it all and paste.

    My first taste of apple wine was a German Sweet Apple wine. So when I first started to make an apple wine I thought, well you use sweet, eating apples right? Wrong, A blend works best I guess.

    Now I'm happy with this purchase that I don't have to cut, freeze and press or run the apples through my juicer.
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2018
  9. Oct 31, 2018 #9

    Brigitte

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    Hey Scooter. I have an email saying you messaged me. Did you get my response ? I’m having trouble with the forum today
     
  10. Oct 31, 2018 #10

    Scooter68

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    Got it
     
  11. Oct 31, 2018 #11

    Yeasty Boy

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    Anyone have a recipe for already pressed apple juice into wine? I found the orchard that presses to order here in Nebraska.
     
  12. Oct 31, 2018 #12

    Thig

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    I got this one off Jack Keller's site a few years ago:

    APPLE JUICE WINE
    This recipe uses fresh apple juice. Read the label before buying fresh juice, as some is
    heavily preserved and unsuitable for making wine as the yeast will not persevere. I buy my
    juice at a health food store and it is pasteurized rather than preserved. It comes in glass
    gallon jugs and costs about $5. I begin fermentation in a primary and rack the wine back to
    the jug. When finished, I have both wine to enjoy and a new gallon jug. Also, I do not begin
    drinking last year's apple wine until I bottle this year's wine. That year of aging in the
    bottle makes a huge difference in quality.

    1 gal fresh or bottled apple juice
    1-1/4 lb granulated sugar
    1 tsp acid blend
    1-2/3 tsp pectic enzyme
    1 crushed Campden tablet
    1/4 to 1/2 tsp tannin
    1-1/2 tsp yeast nutrient
    1 pkt Champagne wine yeast

    In a primary, stir in sugar until completely dissolved. Add acid blend, 1/4 teaspoon tannin,
    yeast nutrient, and crushed Campden tablet. Stir well, cover primary and set aside for 12
    hours. Stir in pectic enzyme and recover primary. After additional 12 hours, add activated
    yeast and recover primary. Stir daily for 10 days, keeping covered. Taste wine to determine
    tannin adequacy. If not adequate, stir in 1/8 teaspoon additional tannin and set aside 4
    hours. Taste again to determine if another 1/8 teaspoon is required. When satisfied, rack
    into gallon secondary and fit airlock. Any additional wine can be poured into small bottle
    for topping up later and airlocked using #2 or #3 bung. Rack, top up and refit sirlock every
    60 days for 6 months. Stabilize, sweeten if desired and wait 2 weeks. Rack into bottles and
    set aside one year.
     
  13. Oct 31, 2018 #13

    Scooter68

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    Just be aware that Jack Keller's recipes often result in a High ABV wine. So check your SG as you go, don't just dump in 1 1/2lbs of sugar.

    Also interesting is that in his recipe for using Apple Juice he suggests the use of tannin. In another recipe for Apple Wine (Using "Windfall Apples) he doesn't even mention checking to see if you need tannin. That recipe is the one I posted here in an earlier post.
     
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  14. Oct 31, 2018 #14

    Yeasty Boy

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    Ok thanks, I did do a one gallon test recipe this year with some Musselmans Cider from the store. I used about the same ingredients as above only i used 2lbs per gallon and did it in the glass jug. I did one recipe with brown sugar and one with white. I liked the white better, the brown had more of a molasses flavor. They are bottled and will wait until next year-ish. I found an orchard near me that just squeezes the apples and puts them in a jug, nothing else. I ordered 5 gallons from them and since it will cost me a little more and be a better quality I wanted to make sure my recipe was good. Maybe I will back off on the sugar on this one and start it in the primary fermenter bucket.
     
  15. Oct 31, 2018 #15

    Scooter68

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    Just check the ABV calculator and make sure that 1) Your yeast can handle it and 2) The ABV will result in a ABV you like, not too high. And Buckets are always the safer way to go to avoid spills and foam fountains.
     
  16. Nov 5, 2018 #16

    Scooter68

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    Thawed the Apple Cider - The labels lists contents as: Apple Juice U/V treated. Period that's all.

    Right now I'm giving it 36-48 hours before I pitch the yeast. Do need to check the pH first and adjust that later this evening.
    Contents for this 3 gallon batch.
    3 Gallons Murphy Orchard Apple Cider
    6 Cups Sugar
    5 cups water (Correction from initial post of 4 cups)
    1/2 tsp Tannin
    4 Tbls Pectic Enzyme
    3 oz White Grape Juice Concentrate

    Will list additional items as added. Right now planning on using EC-1118 Yeast
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2018
  17. Nov 5, 2018 #17

    Johnd

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    I know you were happy to find some apple juice made of nothing but apple juice! Just curious, I assume the 4 cups of water and juice concentrate you added were to make sure that post fermentation / racking that you had enough to fill the 3 gallon carboy??
     
  18. Nov 5, 2018 #18

    Scooter68

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    In part, that water, was heated and used to dissolve the sugar before adding. (Dual purpose addition)

    Volume right now is sitting about 3 1/4 - 1/3 gallons
     
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  19. Nov 6, 2018 #19

    Scooter68

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    Ok rechecked SG and measured pH.
    SG 1.090
    pH 3.50
    Added 1tsp Acid Blend - will recheck pH before pitching yeast ( I like to be real close to 3.40 for most of my wines when I pitch the yeast)
    Added 1 3/4 tsp Yeast Nutrient (Holding out 1/4 tsp for yeast starter and 1 full tsp for later addition when SG hits 1.050-1.040
    Initial mix was completed at 1:00pm today and rechecked at 5:30PM.
    Plan on pitching yeast tomorrow night

    (JohnD - rechecked volume and it's right at 3 1/4 gallons. Since there wasn't as much pulp in this juice as I expected I'm hoping gross lees won't kill my volume estimate. I did increase ABV initial goal to 13.13 so even with a little water addition I don't expect to suffer too much dilution of ABV or taste.)
     
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  20. Nov 7, 2018 #20

    Scooter68

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    Ok rechecked the pH today and it moved the wrong way to about 3.65. Added 1 tablespoon of Acid Blend an 1 1/2 teaspoons of Malic Acid - stirred and rechecked the pH - 3.43.

    Made my yeast starter with 1 oz warm water, 2 oz of the juice, 1/4 teaspoon of yeast nutrient and the yeast (EC-1118) Ten minutes later the 4 oz glass was loaded with foam, gave it 10 more minutes to cool off some and then pitched the starter.
     
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