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TB1

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I was at a supply house the other day picking up a hundred liquor bags when a display on the wall caught my eye. it was quarts and gallons of artificial flavoring for commercial ice-cream machines and snow cone machines. Some of the flavors I have been looking fore in nature but thus fair no luck. talked to the guy and he said in the ice-cream flavoring it takes two ounces to make five gallons. So buying some right then and there was out of the question. Because everyone knows you make wine from real fruit. But I was wondering if anyone has ever tried or herd of anyone that tried making artificially flavored wine to get the flavor thay wanted? probably have to piggyback it in with a light white wine I would imagine.
 
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mmadmikes1

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I have a BOTTLE OF COFFEE flavoring like expresso stands use. It is natural flavor and I bought at the reasurant suppy. I will try in on some mead. We dont seem to have any taboos around here on what to use in the wine but if it works tell everyone. We learn by trial and err.
 

Wade E

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Anything is worth a try but just dont do it on large volumes. Ive used an artificila flavor once designed for beer and it was nasty so I never did it again and dumped that wine after 4 months!
 

Sacalait

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Yes it does work to enhance the flavor of the fruit in country wines. By far the biggest consideration is the flavoring used. Only use premium flavorings and after you settle on a good one be very cautious adding it to your wine, a little goes a long way so do numerous taste tests.
 

Luc

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Ice cream flavoring might not work.
I imagine it is based on flavors that dissolve in oil/fat and they will not mix with water/alcohol.
I am not sure but I have tried cake flavorings and you could see the oil floating on top of the wine.

Better use syrups that you can find in the grocery stores. Syrups are meant to be dissolved in water.

However I think this is really a last resort for bad wines.
A good made wine does not need ANY artificial flavoring (including an f-pack for that matter).
Remember you are making wine, not liquor or flavored alcohol.

Luc
 

summersolstice

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I'm with Luc on this one. I have a strong aversion to using artificial flavorings in my wines and meads. I'd consider natural flavorings like pure vanilla extract or something similar but I'd still prefer to use vanilla beans or the actual source of the flavoring. But as the previous poster said, whatever works for you.
 

TB1

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Thanks . You have giving me something to think about, You see after making that batch of teaberry wine it turned out so well I decided to put that in my privet stock. The chances of finding them again in that quantities again may very well never happen again. Although I have been inundated with request for it (guess I should have kept a tighter lip?) So when I seen the teaberry ice cream flavoring The thought of the possibility of a reasonable replica of it might be possible. But I am betting its an oil base. So I am thinking it may be pretty much out of the question. Its just not one of them flavors you you can can readily find in usable quantities for wine, natural or otherwise. But I may do some more checking on it yet.

Thank You
 
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arcticsid

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This is a question that comes up in here, and, in fact, was one of the very first questions I ever asked in here. About using these extracts, syrups, etc, to enhance the flavoring after fermentation, and before bottling.

I have seen in a few wine making catalogs that have extracts formulated to do just that, enhancing your wine, in fact, I just seen a latest addition of Northern Brewers' catalog and they had a pretty good list of flavoring extracts, you would have to do the research, or maybe some others know more.

But it seems to me that if you were to choose a frozen juice concentrate "from the grocers freezer" and simmer that SLOWLY!!!, you should be able to have a strong flavor, but it will be sweet.

But I stand with the majority, DO NOT use artificial, there are better alternatives.
 
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