Pecan Shell Fermentation

Wine Making Talk

Help Support Wine Making Talk:

BottomsUp

On & Off Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2010
Messages
12
Reaction score
1
Has anybody ever tried using pecan shells in their fermentation and if so, how did it result?
 

BottomsUp

On & Off Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2010
Messages
12
Reaction score
1
Thus far, all I've found on this subject is as follows...

Activated carbon was petitioned to remove brown color from white grape juice concentrate.
For example, activated carbon prepared from pecan nut shells has the same decolorizing effect on azo dyes as activated charcoal sold for water treatment (Young, 1996). Wine fined with baker’s yeast had comparable removal of phenols to activated carbon, with a taste panel detecting no significant difference in color, flavor, and aroma (Bonilla, et al., 2001).
Pecan shell activated carbon: synthesis, characterization, and application for the
removal of copper from aqueous solution.
Use of activated charcoal is presently wide spread throughout the food industry for treatment of in-bound water, especially from those plants that relay on wells rather than municipal water sources. It is used to improve odor, color and/or overall sensory quality of the water as well as microbiological and therefore food safety issues. This is critical for those plants producing beverage or juice products. If activated carbon can be manufactured from agricultural products with steam or a non-synthetic chemical activation process, then I could support its limited use in organic food product systems.


2009 Dupeuble, Beaujolais, Gamay.
Smooth and silky Gamay with bright and lush flavors, the Dupeuble, has more than expected depth and richness, making for a rewarding wine. 2009 has done wonders for Beaujolais and brought world attention to this underrated region and to the Gamay grape itself. This vintage shows strawberry, black currants and pecan shells with a plummy body and fine tannins. Even the most jaded of wine enthusiast is thrilled by these wines from Beaujolais and most f the Crus are selling out as fast as they come in!
 

BottomsUp

On & Off Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2010
Messages
12
Reaction score
1
There appear to be many recipies that utilize pecan shells in the process of smoking meats and vegitables but I've found nothing so far extolling virtues or ills in using them for wine making.

Below is an excerpt of yet another (of many) that I found.

One of the best Thanksgiving turkey marinades we've found is a mixture of mayonnaise, boiled pecan hulls and known sugar...
...In a thin saucepan combine shelled pecans left over from your pecan pies along enough water to cover the pecans with two tablespoons of butter. Place the mixture on the stove and bring to a rolling boil over medium to high heat. Once the mixture has boiled, drain the juice from the boiled pecan shells in a colander...
...Add the moist shells to your smoker and let them saturate the Turkey...


It seems to me that the tannins in the shells (and there is a lot of tanin) would lend well for body though.
In addition, there may be some natural clearing (or not) ability too.
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2019
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
hi!! I'm Giancarlo Guillen From Peru . I'm started an Experiment with pecan shell and yeast . When i finish my experiment I'm let u know the result . It's gonna take 3 months to get results.
 

BernardSmith

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2011
Messages
3,153
Reaction score
1,269
Location
Saratoga Springs
hi!! I'm Giancarlo Guillen From Peru . I'm started an Experiment with pecan shell and yeast . When i finish my experiment I'm let u know the result . It's gonna take 3 months to get results.
Hi Giancarlo - and welcome. What kind of experiment are you doing with the yeast and pecan shells? Or is this a secret until you have your results?
 
Top