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crazyclees

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Hi All,
I'm just getting back into winemaking after about 10 years and have just joined to get some good tips and tricks from you all.....

I've have 5 gallons of white on the go at the moment and am trying some rhubarb wine (with bread yeast!) can this be done?

bye for now,

Pete
 

Tom

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Hi All,
I'm just getting back into winemaking after about 10 years and have just joined to get some good tips and tricks from you all.....

I've have 5 gallons of white on the go at the moment and am trying some rhubarb wine (with bread yeast!) can this be done?

bye for now,

Pete
Welcome back into the hobby.. er obsession.
Rhubarb can be made. I doubt that bread yeast will do much thou. That yeast is not very alcohol tolerant.
Get wine yeast
 

Wade E

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Welcome. Bread yeast can be used but just be careful with using it as its a yeast that can be unpredictable as far as how much alc it can produce so dont push it much more then say 10-11% abv which means a starting sg of no more then like 1.085 or you will most likely over do your yeast starin and end up with residual sugar in your wine and if you like your wine dry this is not good. You will not get the same results with the same recipe from this yeast but it will work. Do you have access to wine makers yeast around there?
 

smurfe

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Welcome aboard. Glad to have you here. As Wade said, the bread yeast can be a bit unpredictable. I have used it a few times on a popular mead recipe. I have had the recipes ferment to bone dry and had some stop at around 1.040. Many don't realize though that for many many years this type of yeast was used for wine making. Nothing wrong with it. We always have to recommend using a wine yeast and in most areas, it cost no more than the bread yeast.
 

St Allie

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Morning Pete


Rhubarb can be quite acidic too and you'll need to leave it a year before drinking, minimum. I suggest you blend it with apple juice and backsweeten it to taste to tone it down a bit.

Allie
 
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Luc

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Hi there,

I have used bread yeast numerous times and never had a problem with it. Then I never pushed the limit and my wines are seldom over 11% alcohol.

As you know rhubarb is high in acid and I have found a way to lower the acid. it involves using a freezer.
If you do have a large freezer with spare room I really recommend this method.

http://wijnmaker.blogspot.com/2007/06/scroll-down-for-english-text-al-lange.html

It comes down to this.
First freeze the rhubarb. Then thaw it. It will release the juice almost immediately.
Next freeze the juice. Then take it out of the freezer and cut out all the really dark parts. That is where the acid is located. Put these in a seperate bottle for thawing.

Now when the juice has thawed measure acidity and adjust it with adding bits of the darker juice.
I just bottled 2 batches of rhubarb wine using this method and i can really recommend it.

Luc
Luc
 

Nubz

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welcome to the forum you have definately came to the correct place

i recomend anything Luc suggest you read on his blog ive learned many things by reading his stuff
 

smurfe

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Great info as usual Luc. I have been meaning to tell you that you can promote your blog all you want here. I don't even care if you make a thread or post each time you update it. Your information is invaluable.
 

BettyJ

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Wow - wonder if this would work with other high acid fruits? My lime wine (just 2 months old) is pretty darned tart - although the PH is within range according to my little strips.
 

crazyclees

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Hi Tom,

Thanks for the advice.... its stopped fermenting now and I've added some wine and beer finings to see what happens! I'll let you know what happens when it's done!

Pete
 

crazyclees

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Welcome. Bread yeast can be used but just be careful with using it as its a yeast that can be unpredictable as far as how much alc it can produce so dont push it much more then say 10-11% abv which means a starting sg of no more then like 1.085 or you will most likely over do your yeast starin and end up with residual sugar in your wine and if you like your wine dry this is not good. You will not get the same results with the same recipe from this yeast but it will work. Do you have access to wine makers yeast around there?
Hi Wade,

Thanks for the advice.... it was just an experiment as I had some rhubarb growing in my garden.... and the climate in the north east of england is not really hot!. I then added some caster sugar into it (about 1/2 a bag - that's 500 grammes) to see what would happen. I've just added some finings to it and will let you know the result!

Thanks again,

Pete
 

crazyclees

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Thanks to all the advice from the people that have replied to my original message... I'm just getting used to using this forum so bear with me! lol
 

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