Hazy mead after backsweetening

Winemaking Talk - Winemaking Forum

Help Support Winemaking Talk - Winemaking Forum:

tradowsk

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2018
Messages
242
Reaction score
90
Last night I backsweetened two 1-gallon batches of mead using local wildflower honey. The honey was filtered and appeared very clear in the jar. The mead was also crystal clear at that point, as I had put some kieselsol in it previously.

However, after mixing 1/2lb honey in, the mead became very hazy.

These batches are purely for family use so I don't really care if it's not clear, I just don't want to bottle it hazy and come back in a few months to a bunch of sediment on the bottom.

What exactly is in the honey that it would cause it to haze up even though both the mead and honey appeared to be clear? Should I add more kieselsol or will whatever is in there stay in suspension?
 

dralarms

Overboard as usual
Staff member
Super Moderator
Joined
Jul 15, 2012
Messages
3,709
Reaction score
1,437
I made the same mistake. You’re going to have to clear again. I made a batch, superkleered, and then back sweetend. Had to superkleer again
 

BeeMad

Member
Joined
Oct 28, 2018
Messages
34
Reaction score
5
Location
Georgia
As a beekeeper, my thought are that the honey most likely wasn't filtered, or at least not filtered very well, so you have some pollen/wax particulates affecting the clarity. Personally, if it's only for your consumption, it's nothing to worry about.
 

Rice_Guy

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2014
Messages
1,811
Reaction score
1,620
Location
Food Industry - - Retired
[QUOTE="tradowsk, post: 721182, member: 39428

What exactly is in the honey that it would cause it to haze up even though both the mead and honey appeared to be clear? Should I add more kieselsol or will whatever is in there stay in suspension?[/QUOTE]

honey has proteins in it which create the cloud
The primary ferment has you denature the protein by boiling, chances are bee protein is positively charged, so negatively charged fining should work. I leave it in and it stayed cloudy.
 

tradowsk

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2018
Messages
242
Reaction score
90
It reminds me of the look of a pectin haze where it's not clear but I can't identify any particles floating in it. So I don't think the cause of this is pollen or wax, both of which I had in these batches after fermentation since I used raw honey.

But kieselsol worked spectacularly when I used it pre-backsweetening, so if there are positively charged proteins in the honey then it should work again. Not really concerned with the look, but it would be a nice experiment to verify. I'll try another dose of kieselsol today and report back.
 
Last edited:

tradowsk

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2018
Messages
242
Reaction score
90
Update: I added 6mL kieselsol to each batch yesterday morning, and as of now nothing has changed. The mead is still hazy but nothing seems to have settled out either.

I'm going to try adding chitosan tonight to see if maybe the opposite charge clarifier will work.
 

dralarms

Overboard as usual
Staff member
Super Moderator
Joined
Jul 15, 2012
Messages
3,709
Reaction score
1,437
You’re supposed to add the chitosan within 24 hrs of adding the kieselsol. Probably still work but I only wait 2 to 3 hrs before adding the chitosan.
 

tradowsk

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2018
Messages
242
Reaction score
90
I usually do add chito after about 12hrs.

But when I first clarified this mead it was already crystal clear with just the kieselsol so I didn't bother with the chito. But maybe I do need it after backsweetening.
 

tradowsk

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2018
Messages
242
Reaction score
90
12hrs after adding the chito and everything is nice and clear again!

So I guess the answer is to clarify after backsweetening and not before. Good to know moving forward. Thanks for all the advice everyone!
 
Top