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#8 versus #9 corks

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jimnjan

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Our very first batch of wine was started on Valentine's Day & we're curious about the upcoming processes.
Our supply kit came with 30 ea. #8 corks, but I believe I read somewhere that #9 corks provide a better seal (?).
I have NOT bought a corker yet, & would like to know if #9's are hard to put in with a double-lever hand corker.

I also need to mention that I have back problems (bulging discs). I saw a video using a hand corker and it looked like a painful process with the bottle between the feet & bending forward to insert the cork.

The wine we're making is a "World Vineyard, California Trinity Red",a blend of Cab/Franc, Cab/ Sauv, & Merlot, so I imagine it will taste better if aged for 6 mos. to 1 yr.
Thanks!
Jim & Jan
 

Skyhawk

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I can't use a double-lever hand corker, because my wife gets angry at me when she hears all my swearing while using it. My back is fine, but I've found it a slightly frustrating experience.

I wouldn't even think twice with what I know today. I say spend the little extra for a floor corker and don't look back.
 

cpfan

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jim&jan:

I think most people use the double lever hand corker on a counter. The problem is that it is nice if it is held teady. Some people make it a two person job...one to hold the bottle still. Another good suggestion is a concrete block...wrap a towel around the bottle and put it in one of the cavities to hold it in place.

BTW, IMHO get a floor corker.

Not much difference between #8 and #9 corks. 1 or 2mm in diameter. If you're using a hand corker, some folks find the #8s much better. With a floor corker it doesn't matter.

Steve
 
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mjdtexan

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I too was wondering if getting the floor corker was worth the money or not. I didnt realize that the two handle corker was a two person operation.
 

cpfan

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I too was wondering if getting the floor corker was worth the money or not. I didnt realize that the two handle corker was a two person operation.
It can be a one person operation. Many people find that the bottle slips and slides around unless it is held somehow. Often the easiest way is a second person.

BTW, somebody once told me that corking needed FOUR people. One to operate the hand corker. The second to hold the bottle. Another to take the corked bottle away. The fourth to deliver an uncorked bottle. I wondered why they didn't have a fifth person to hand the corker operator a fresh cork. :D

IMHO, get a floor corker.

Steve
 

Skyhawk

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Around here, the Portuguese floor corker only costs $10 more than the double lever corker ($34.99 versus $24.99). The only reason I can see why some might prefer the lever corker is because they have a storage space problem.

Some corkers available here in Ottawa
 

Wade E

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Get the floor corker and 1.75" x #9 corks IMO. The dble lever Portuguese hand corker is the best hand corker but still a PITA and #9 corks make it even more troublesome and can stick up past the bottle at times.
 

jimnjan

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Looks like I'll go with the floor corker. There's an Italian floor corker at the local brew store for $140.00.
Twissty, that corker is just slightly out of my price range!
Thanks to all for the input.
Jim (of Jim & Jan).
 

Wade E

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The Portuguese works very well, just dont try and use full synthetics with it as its not strong enough to compress it equally and will actually leave ridges on the sides which will leak ever so little.
 

Manimal

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Get the floor corker... I've been using my stupid hand corker for far too long and have decided I need to suck it up and get a floor corker. They're not really that expensive, they last forever, they're easier to use and they do a much nicer job.
 

Wray

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corker

I have seen floor corkers on the internet for $119. Probably does not include shipping.
 

jimnjan

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Definitely will consider the Portugese. That's quite a savings over the Italian.
BTW Wade, really like the "Frontal Lobotomy" saying!
Jim
 

Skyhawk

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You can get 1 for $65
I'm just amazed that so much of this stuff is cheaper at my local retail store here in Canada. The same Portuguese floor corker is $35.

For all my other hobbies, which unfortunately are all more expensive than wine making, it's the other way around :mad:
 

TheTooth

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I'm just amazed that so much of this stuff is cheaper at my local retail store here in Canada. The same Portuguese floor corker is $35.

For all my other hobbies, which unfortunately are all more expensive than wine making, it's the other way around :mad:
That is insanely good pricing. Count yourself lucky. :)
 

Dugger

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The Portuguese works very well, just dont try and use full synthetics with it as its not strong enough to compress it equally and will actually leave ridges on the sides which will leak ever so little.
Wade - that's interesting about synthetics - because of the plastic jaws I assume. I've not noticed this on synthetics I use - are the marks quite noticeable?
.. Doug
 

Wade E

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It depends on the cork as some are more pliable then others. I have seen lots of posts where the corks were leaking from trying to use this corker with a synthetic cork even though some may work, it is advisable not to use them.
 

cpfan

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I am not aware of an "everybody agrees" reason why synthetic corks are damaged by some corkers. I have seen floor corkers with burrs on the jaws. That is why I think it happens. But folks who claim no burrs on their jaws have the problem with synthetics.

BTW, the corker is probably scoring the natural corks as well, but due to the nature of cork it apparently swells out and closes the gap. The synthetic closures do not do that.

Steve
 

Wade E

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I could surely be wrong but most of he time it is this Portuguese corker that does it(the one I have and love), I think it is because the nylon jaws just arent strong enough to compress and leave gaps and not scores which let wine leak through next to these protrusions.
 

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