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What temperature of water for dissolving sugar?

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arcticsid

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I had just read somewhere recently that it was not recommended to dissolve sugar in boiling water. Not backsweetening, I am talking about the primary liquid.

Is there any truth to this? Is it better just to get it hot?

Also it said not to add all of the sugar at once, but to gradually add it as it dissolves.

Anyone have a take on this?

Troy
 

Racer

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I'm interested in the answers on this one too Troy.

I start with cold tap water and add the sugar right away. I stir constantly and turn the heat off as soon as i see that all the sugar has disolved.
 

arcticsid

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I'm pretty sure you wouldn't want to add the sugar to cold water, because the "clump" will be sitting directly on the heat. Don't know what difference it makes. I can't for the life of me remeber where I just read this.

Sure am curious to see if anyone else knows anything on this.
 

Runningwolf

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I bring the water to a rolling boil, shut off the heat and slowly add the sugar as I stir. After it cools I store it in milk jugs refrigerated until I am ready to use it. I usually make 2 gallons at a time just to cut down on how often I have to do it.
 

Tom

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bring to a low boil, and add sugar and use a whisk to stir. When clear its done and can be added to the must when it cools down.
BTW,
I use some of the must not add extra water if you have already the amt you need
 

Tom

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:u
Me thinks we have a doubting (steve) Thomas...:slp
 

Runningwolf

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:u
Me thinks we have a doubting (steve) Thomas...:slp
Tom, please go easy on the new people as Wade ask of us. After all he is from Pittsburgh where they are still trying to figure out the game of football.:slp
 

Tom

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Tom, please go easy on the new people as Wade ask of us. After all he is from Pittsburgh where they are still trying to figure out the game of football.:slp
Now wait a minute djrockinsteve is not new. That is the post Im responding to.. Dan, I guess I neew to quote so U dont get confused...:h
 

Slyder73

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I'll weigh in. The temperature at which you dissolve your sugar is irrelevant, as long as it dissolves. Warm to boiling, as long as the sugar dissolves, and it will. There is no temperature that will make it more effective or not. It is simply a molecule dissolved in a liquid and will have the same properties at whatever reasonable temperature we keep our wine making steps and that solution will perform at the predicted efficiency for the temperature (i.e. fermenting faster at 76 degrees than at 65 degrees).

The question should be whether or not the temperature in which the solution of dissolved sugar will have an effect on what you are putting it into, and by volume, can it cause adverse "damage"? Can adding boiling sugar solution to a 1 gallon must or fermentation adversely effect the final product? That is the question you should be asking the experts. Has anyone experienced a difference in quality of wine because of high temperature sugar solution added to wine or must? Dissolved sugar into a simple syrup/solution for sweeteing or backsweetening, does anyone have an opinion on whether or not very high temperatures will have an effect on the cooler wine solution it is added to?

I'm predicting not, as basic chemistry dictates, at the temperatures we keep our primary to finished wines, that there will be no reaction from adding sugar other than fermentation for higher alcohol content before sorbate, and adding sweetness to the final product after addition of sorbate.
 
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St Allie

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ok I have stayed out of this as my opinion is a guess.

It needs to be boiled water to kill bacteria. I know you may have enough sulphites in your wine to compensate.. but then again you may not.

using boiled water is common sense in my opinion.

Allie
 

Luc

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Ok, guys and girls, I'll give you my procedure.

After measuring the must I know how much sugar to add.
I also know how much acid to add.

If the must is acidic I need to water it down and therefore use plain tap water. If the must is low on acid I use the must itself to dissolve the required additions in.

So depending on the needs of the must I take:
- water
- or must

In that fluid I dissolve the sugar, acid and nutrient that is needed while slowly boiling it constantly stirring.
As soon as it starts boiling I keep stirring until all solids have dissolved. Next I shut the heat off as soon as possible. I do not want any sugars to caramellise.

Next I cool it down to around 50 degrees celsius (122 degrees Fahrenheit) Au Bain Marie.
Meaning I put my pan in the kitchen sink that has been filled with cold water. That helps cooling it more quickly.

Why this high temperature ???
Well as I pour this to the rest of the must, the overall temperature of the complete must will rise.
Next I add pectic enzymes, and there is the trick: they work better at higher temperatures. Although they stop at temperatures over 40 degrees celsius (104 degrees F). So keeping an eye on the temperature is essential.

See my story about pectic enzymes:
http://wijnmaker.blogspot.com/2008/01/avonturen-op-het-pecto-pad-deel-2.html

Why boil at all ???
Well I hope that any contamination from the sugar or tap water will be boiled to kindom come.

Hope this helps.

Luc
 
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Tom

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Well steve,
Now you know. WE got right from Luc. :i
 

myakkagldwngr

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I too, consider myself a "hossgrapper!" The main thing I have always been concerned about was having the temperture too high when I added it to a must or mash. If it's super hot, it can injure if not kill the yeast and therefore defeat the purpose.
 
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