What parameters do you prefer for your dandelion wine?

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What parameters do you prefer for your dandelion wine? Select one option per category (3 in total):

  • ABV: 8-10 %

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • ABV: 10-12 %

    Votes: 2 50.0%
  • ABV: 12-14 %

    Votes: 1 25.0%
  • ABV: >14 %

    Votes: 1 25.0%
  • SG (sweetness): <0.996

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • SG (sweetness): 0.996-1.000

    Votes: 1 25.0%
  • SG (sweetness): 1.000-1.005

    Votes: 2 50.0%
  • SG (sweetness): >1.005

    Votes: 1 25.0%
  • Dandelion treatment: Hot water soak

    Votes: 2 50.0%
  • Dandelion treatment: Cold water soak

    Votes: 2 50.0%

  • Total voters
    4

Rappatuz

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How do you like your dandelion wine with regards to ABV and sweetness (bottled SG)? Also, when making the must, my experience is that petals give off different flavors when treated with hot water compared to cold/room temperature water. In the poll, select one option from each of the three categories.

If you have an impression about how long dandelion wine takes to "peak" (taste wise), please add.
 

Bossbaby

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I have not made it yet but this may be the year to do so, I am interested to hear other specifics as well, like lbs per gal or even variants blended with other fruits.
 

Rappatuz

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I have not made it yet but this may be the year to do so, I am interested to hear other specifics as well, like lbs per gal or even variants blended with other fruits.
I started a small batch last spring which is still bulk aging, but first did a test. I weighed an amount of petals, put them in a cup and poured over a specific volume of hot water. I did the same thing with another cup, but used cold water. I let both cups sit in the fridge for about four days and did regular tastings. The hot water test had a flavor that I estimated to be 3-4 times stronger than the cold water test. However, the cold water test preserved floral tastes and aromas very well, unlike the hot water test, which had a more "earthy" taste, in lack of a better word. The hot water test was also more bitter (although, still a usable flavor).

I decided to go for quality over quantity, cold soaked, and used 200 g of petals (yes, only yellow petals) per liter. I made about 7.5 liters, which amounts to a lot of picking and even more work with separating petals from flowers.

If you haven't made dandelion wine before, I suggest doing the same test before starting the batch. In order to create the best chances for success, the must should taste great IMO.
 

Rice_Guy

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I will heat treat the yellow in a microwave with a table spoon of water. The purpose of this is to inactivate the ripening enzyme system. opinion: the flavor is better at about five or eight days after flowering starts and goes down after this. ANY FEEDBACK?
How do you like your dandelion wine with regards to ABV and sweetness (bottled SG)? Also, when making the must, my experience is that petals give off different flavors when treated with hot water compared to cold/room temperature water. In the poll, select one option from each of the three categories.
If you have an impression about how long dandelion wine takes to "peak" (taste wise), please add.
535327D1-B39B-4F23-97D8-38F57598AF1A.jpeg
 

BernardSmith

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C J J Berry, suggests about 500 g (about 1 lb of petals per gallon) and that a two day maceration is the longest you should allow the petals to steep for otherwise you extract more of the vegetative flavors that then tend overpower the floral flavors and aromas. He suggests pouring boiling water over the petals before you macerate. He asserts that you can use the whole flower head. But the green makes for an unpleasantly bitter wine. I adapted his recipe last summer to make 1 gallon of wine and one of mead and both came out quite fine after 6 months in the bottle but this is a summer wine so I am holding back about 4 bottles of each for this summer.
 

Rappatuz

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I will heat treat the yellow in a microwave with a table spoon of water. The purpose of this is to inactivate the ripening enzyme system. opinion: the flavor is better at about five or eight days after flowering starts and goes down after this. ANY FEEDBACK?
If I decide to make dandelion this spring I'll surely try to pick them early. Great tip!

C J J Berry, suggests about 500 g (about 1 lb of petals per gallon) and that a two day maceration is the longest you should allow the petals to steep for otherwise you extract more of the vegetative flavors that then tend overpower the floral flavors and aromas. He suggests pouring boiling water over the petals before you macerate. He asserts that you can use the whole flower head. But the green makes for an unpleasantly bitter wine. I adapted his recipe last summer to make 1 gallon of wine and one of mead and both came out quite fine after 6 months in the bottle but this is a summer wine so I am holding back about 4 bottles of each for this summer.
Two days max. I'll certainly try that out next time. Can't remember how long I let them soak in my last batch, but it must've been more than two days. From your post I understand that you only include petals, not the whole head?
 

BernardSmith

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Only the petals and I use scissors to remove the petals from the green bulb. I view the speed of using scissors as a larger benefit than any loss of petals due to cutting rather than pulling and as I make only a single gallon or two then harvesting a gallon of petals per gallon is not too onerous over a few days: the idea being to freeze the petals in bags until I have collected a gallon.
 

Rappatuz

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Only the petals and I use scissors to remove the petals from the green bulb. I view the speed of using scissors as a larger benefit than any loss of petals due to cutting rather than pulling and as I make only a single gallon or two then harvesting a gallon of petals per gallon is not too onerous over a few days: the idea being to freeze the petals in bags until I have collected a gallon.
I've "pinched" petals off the flowers the two times I've made dandelion. Although you quickly get the technique down, it still takes a lot of time this way. The advantage is that you get all (and whole) petals, and zero greens. The speed of a scissor may be unbeatable, though. Especially if you pick them when they're closed, although I think I've read that they should be picked in full sun.
 

ruhbarb76

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Look Ma, No scissors: For removing the petals, There is a You Tube video where a girl is sitting in a field of dandelions twisting the petals loose. It does work. It goes like this: With an opened flower, firmly grasp the bulb (under-side) between the thumb and index finger. Now, roll it. Presto, the petals are loosened ( At times, a reverse roll might be required).
 

Rappatuz

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I have not made it yet but this may be the year to do so, I am interested to hear other specifics as well, like lbs per gal or even variants blended with other fruits.
Forgot to address the blending aspect. I think both raisins and bananas are popular for adding body to dandelion wine. I've tried both, but the verdict is still out on the raisin one. Hopefully, someone with more experience will touch on the subject.

You don't want to overpower the dandelion flavor. I made sure that the "body enhancer" weighed no more than half the mass of the petals.
 

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