making wine from Marquette grapes

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I blend mine as follows. Marquette 20% Petite pearl 45% and Verona35%. I'm no expert but all who try it rave how much they like this wine. I'm also happy.
Ok, good to know. I also have Verona & Petite Pearl planted, so I will definitely try this!
 

wood1954

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Update on 2020 vintage. I had a bottle sitting among the carboys since the fall and opened it for dinner tonight. Very surprised at how much better it is now. Well balanced still a little thin but tasty and easy drinking, 2020 wasn’t a bust after all. It’s amazing the magic that happens in the bottle.
 

montanarick

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Couldn't agree more. our 2017 has finally come of age - patience really is a virtue
 

JWT_Can

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During aging have you found the wine to lose tannins and get thinner than at bottling? Curious what changes you notice as the wine develops in the bottle.
 

Vern

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During aging have you found the wine to lose tannins and get thinner than at bottling? Curious what changes you notice as the wine develops in the bottle.
I also made some Marquette wine in 2017. I'm not sure if the tannins changed, but now the wine is very good.
 

montanarick

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During aging have you found the wine to lose tannins and get thinner than at bottling? Curious what changes you notice as the wine develops in the bottle.
Just gets more mature. nicer mouthfeel and smoother finish. no real perceptible change to tannins that are obvious but then I didn't overbake with oak
 

Steve Wargo

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I thought, the Marquette was more of a Nouveau Style wine. This based on my experience as to how early some wineries begin to serve their Marquette wine. That, usually the summer season following the previous year's fall harvest. I drank the 2018 Marquette wine in the fall of 2019. It was good. Definitely Nouveau Style. Opened a Marquette 2018 in the fall of 2020. It improved a little bit, but not as expected. There is one bottle left of 2018 Marquette in my cellar(basement). Aging it longer might improve its profile. Maybe it's a grape wine that needs the full three years to develop, as are many other well-known grape wines. Marquette may be a Nouveau Style wine and one that improves with age. I dunno I'm still reading and experimenting with the grape. Time will tell.
 

sour_grapes

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I thought, the Marquette was more of a Nouveau Style wine. This based on my experience as to how early some wineries begin to serve their Marquette wine. That, usually the summer season following the previous year's fall harvest. I drank the 2018 Marquette wine in the fall of 2019. It was good. Definitely Nouveau Style. Opened a Marquette 2018 in the fall of 2020. It improved a little bit, but not as expected. There is one bottle left of 2018 Marquette in my cellar(basement). Aging it longer might improve its profile. Maybe it's a grape wine that needs the full three years to develop, as are many other well-known grape wines. Marquette may be a Nouveau Style wine and one that improves with age. I dunno I'm still reading and experimenting with the grape. Time will tell.
Do you mean the wines you sampled were prepared by carbonic maceration, rather than yeast-based alcoholic fermentation?
 

Steve Wargo

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Do you mean the wines you sampled were prepared by carbonic maceration, rather than yeast-based alcoholic fermentation?
The wine example in my original post was produced using yeast fermentation, bottled, and served within 5 - 6 months. Young and fruity.
 
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hello I am a LA CA wine maker, Even though Marquette grapes is a east coast thing I am growing it in southern CA on a trial basis and it is performing very well....it began to bloom in mid January and is now starting to ripen Memorial Day weekend, I am excited we are having very cool gloomy spring weather in LA 2021 and I am in the San Fernando valley. in my field I also have Baco Noir Syrah, Zin and merlot. Once the grapes are ripen mid July I will crush then freeze, wait then co-ferment with my other wines grapes that ripen in Aug to September, last years wine turned out fantastic.....,.,.any thought let me know I love all your comments....cheers William
 

Cynewulf

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hello I am a LA CA wine maker, Even though Marquette grapes is a east coast thing I am growing it in southern CA on a trial basis and it is performing very well....it began to bloom in mid January and is now starting to ripen Memorial Day weekend, I am excited we are having very cool gloomy spring weather in LA 2021 and I am in the San Fernando valley. in my field I also have Baco Noir Syrah, Zin and merlot. Once the grapes are ripen mid July I will crush then freeze, wait then co-ferment with my other wines grapes that ripen in Aug to September, last years wine turned out fantastic.....,.,.any thought let me know I love all your comments....cheers William
Welcome to WMT! I’m always interested when folks grow hybrids on the west coast and would love to hear more about your experience: how you chose Marquette and Baco Noir, what your spray schedule is, winemaking approach, etc. I replaced a lot of my vinifera vines here in Virginia with Marquette and Itasca for the disease resistance rather than the cold hardiness and they’ve been so much easier so far. I’m hoping to get my first real harvest this year.
 

swv

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Just to uphold our Minnesota pride (almost as big as Texas'), Marquette`s were developed in Minnesota. They are a Midwest thing that can be grown on the east coast. And glad to hear the west coast also.;)
 
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Welcome to WMT! I’m always interested when folks grow hybrids on the west coast and would love to hear more about your experience: how you chose Marquette and Baco Noir, what your spray schedule is, winemaking approach, etc. I replaced a lot of my vinifera vines here in Virginia with Marquette and Itasca for the disease resistance rather than the cold hardiness and they’ve been so much easier so far. I’m hoping to get my first real harvest this year.
Thank You.....I began to make wine about 4 years ago, and decided I wanted to try grapes that no one else has.... so I brought the Baco Noir 2 years ago and last year I planted a root stock of the Marquette and this year the vine is full of grapes and starting to ripen,.... The Baco Noir is grown in CA now w many wine makers using it to add a fruity notes to there wines,.................In my garden I have 50 vines all planted together - Merlot, Zin, Syrah, Baco Noir, Marquette, Port, and a few white table grapes.....I spray the garden once a month w "7" until the fruit begins to ripen.....So far in CA for 2021 we have had less then 4 inches of rain, where as in 2020 we had 40 inches..........Starting in Jan we had warm months through March......., but cool April and May days with very cool nights and gloomy mornings perfect for wine growing....In jan I root started more clippings of both Baco Noir and Marquette for more vine growing....................The main reason I decided to try to grow these 2 grapes is because.... I am in the holiday business of lighting homes for halloween and Christmas and I like to have my wines made by mid September.............Because the Marquette and Baco Noir ripen a few months before the others,... I pic them early with the correct Brix then crush and freeze until the other grapes are ripen, then I thaw and I co-ferment all my wine grapes together for 14 to 16 days..........I then do a malalatic Ferm for 3 months in neutral oak barrels and continue to age in oak for 5 more months, from there I transfer them to a cowboy and let sit for 4 to 5 months before bottling...
 
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Just to uphold our Minnesota pride (almost as big as Texas'), Marquette`s were developed in Minnesota. They are a Midwest thing that can be grown on the east coast. And glad to hear the west coast also.;)
yes I am trying and they r growing great. cheers
 
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hello I am a LA CA wine maker, Even though Marquette grapes is a east coast thing I am growing it in southern CA on a trial basis and it is performing very well....it began to bloom in mid January and is now starting to ripen Memorial Day weekend, I am excited we are having very cool gloomy spring weather in LA 2021 and I am in the San Fernando valley. in my field I also have Baco Noir Syrah, Zin and merlot. Once the grapes are ripen mid July I will crush then freeze, wait then co-ferment with my other wines grapes that ripen in Aug to September, last years wine turned out fantastic.....,.,.any thought let me know I love all your comments....cheers William
here is a pic of my Baco Noir on May 1 2021
 

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