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cuz

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I like to filter before bottling. I feel like it insures that the wine will have no residual at the bottom of the bottle. I am uncertain if filtering removes any characteristics of the wine. I attached a picture of my filter. I use a .5 or .1 filter cartridge
 

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DPCellars

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I like to filter before bottling. I feel like it insures that the wine will have no residual at the bottom of the bottle. I am uncertain if filtering removes any characteristics of the wine. I attached a picture of my filter. I use a .5 or .1 filter cartridge
hat wine looks perty! I have not filtered before. In fact, I have not done clarifying either. I have lucked out with no residual in the bottle/glass. Although clear and pretty, it will never achieve that elusive luster that the commercial wines have. I am okay with it though. I cannot swear to it, but I believe, with my very uneducated opinion on the matter, it does do something to the flavor. It may be very nuanced and only detectable by a very discerning palate, but it just has to. lol
 

KCCam

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I like to filter before bottling. I feel like it insures that the wine will have no residual at the bottom of the bottle. I am uncertain if filtering removes any characteristics of the wine. I attached a picture of my filter. I use a .5 or .1 filter cartridge
I think you mean 5 micron and 1 micron filters, which are typical for that filter housing. 5 micron for reds and 1 micron for whites is the typical usage. I doubt very much you would notice any difference in taste. Try bottling some with and some without. Also, understand that filtration is designed to “polish” an already clear wine. Never filter a cloudy wine.
 

jgmillr1

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Also, understand that filtration is designed to “polish” an already clear wine. Never filter a cloudy wine
This is true. But you can step down the filtration size with repeated passes if the filter load is high.

I typically do a 3um coarse filter, then a 1um. This gets the wine fine polished and clear but can still leave yeast available for refermentation and bacteria for spoilage. I'll then take most wines through a 0.45um followed by 0.45um absolute membrane filter at bottling. (That removes bacteria too.)
 

Giacomo

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I
I like to filter before bottling. I feel like it insures that the wine will have no residual at the bottom of the bottle. I am uncertain if filtering removes any characteristics of the wine. I attached a picture of my filter. I use a .5 or .1 filter cartridge
I clear my wine with egg whites and never have to filter. The egg whites draw all the must etc to the bottom. Wine is clear and egg whites do not alter color or taste. Three egg whites three tablespoons of water, pinch of salt, whip thoroughly then put in five gallon carboy, After five to eight days, carboy is ready to re-rack, sludge left at the bottom.
 

hounddawg

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everyone is different,, I use time to clear my wines, i bulk age everything,,, yet I still filter at every racking, and I rack at bottling,, I never use paper filters, I use ONLY a spun polypropylene filter, 1 micron for whites and 5 micron for reds, my filter housings use 2.5 x 10 inch filters, i buy mine by the case on e-bay, one place sells cases of 16 the other sells cases of 25, they run around $1 per filter, and can be washed and reused several times, using K-meta solution, now i keep 25 micron filters for,, from ferment to secondary carboy, , filtering removes no flavor or color,
Dawg
 

wood1954

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I tried filtering, fining agents and finally just use time in carboy. After a year of aging wine is perfectly clear with no effort on my part.
 

AaronSC

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hat wine looks perty! I have not filtered before. In fact, I have not done clarifying either. I have lucked out with no residual in the bottle/glass. Although clear and pretty, it will never achieve that elusive luster that the commercial wines have. I am okay with it though. I cannot swear to it, but I believe, with my very uneducated opinion on the matter, it does do something to the flavor. It may be very nuanced and only detectable by a very discerning palate, but it just has to. lol
Hi Donkey,
You may want to try judicious filtering to see if that gets you to the elusive "commercial" taste. I had heard all sorts of propaganda about filtering removing all sorts of great stuff from wine, etc. so I was worried. I first used it on a sweet wine to help avoid refermentation. It was a fruity Finger Lakes varietal. I was actually blown away by how much better it tasted *after* filtration. The filter was definitely removing things that were interfering with the aroma and flavor of the wine. Since then I filter all whites and almost all reds -it seems to improve things across the board. I got a filter kit from Presque Isle in PA in 1996 and I still use it today -it was a bit pricy but serious bang for the buck!
 

Ct Winemaker

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Cuz and others, on another matter, your Picture looks to me like you have air / vacum leaks on the vac side of your filter allowing the introduction of a lot of air / oxygenation of the wine. You can see the air entrainment in the lines from the filter to your end carboy. We also had this problem with vac / filtering / racking. No matter how much effort we put into sealing the filter and line fittings, we pretty much could not eliminate this. We now use positive pressure for filtering (pump instead of vac) so if not perfectly sealed you get a small leak, but you do not draw oxygen into the wine.
 

hounddawg

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I like to filter before bottling. I feel like it insures that the wine will have no residual at the bottom of the bottle. I am uncertain if filtering removes any characteristics of the wine. I attached a picture of my filter. I use a .5 or .1 filter cartridge
on your filter housing if you turn it upside down and gently shake as you screw together you'll know the ring in the blue top is in the filter correctly and you can see then that the clear ring goes into the filter correctly, that will eliminate your vacuum leak,
Dawg
 

DPCellars

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Hi Donkey,
You may want to try judicious filtering to see if that gets you to the elusive "commercial" taste. I had heard all sorts of propaganda about filtering removing all sorts of great stuff from wine, etc. so I was worried. I first used it on a sweet wine to help avoid refermentation. It was a fruity Finger Lakes varietal. I was actually blown away by how much better it tasted *after* filtration. The filter was definitely removing things that were interfering with the aroma and flavor of the wine. Since then I filter all whites and almost all reds -it seems to improve things across the board. I got a filter kit from Presque Isle in PA in 1996 and I still use it today -it was a bit pricy but serious bang for the buck!
See, now you went and said something that makes total sense. I have said in other posts that I am cheap. Now you have my hooves tapping... More money may be in the future. Lol
 

ZebraB

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Cuz and others, on another matter, your Picture looks to me like you have air / vacum leaks on the vac side of your filter allowing the introduction of a lot of air / oxygenation of the wine. You can see the air entrainment in the lines from the filter to your end carboy. We also had this problem with vac / filtering / racking. No matter how much effort we put into sealing the filter and line fittings, we pretty much could not eliminate this. We now use positive pressure for filtering (pump instead of vac) so if not perfectly sealed you get a small leak, but you do not draw oxygen into the wine.
How specifically do you pump to filter wine? What pump and how is it set up?
 
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Ct Winemaker

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I use this pump (available from Morewine and others) and the same household filter that Cuz shows in his OP. Filter goes between pump and “final wine destination”. So you are pushing the wine through with positive pressure instead of “sucking” which tends to draw air into the smallest possible leaks. Also, the household filter and tubing fittings are designed for positive pressure, not vacuum which is why they are so difficult to seal in vacuum. 7CD1FA82-2F84-4C1B-819F-8BA6ACB36FB7.jpeg
 

mhopkins

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everyone is different,, I use time to clear my wines, i bulk age everything,,, yet I still filter at every racking, and I rack at bottling,, I never use paper filters, I use ONLY a spun polypropylene filter, 1 micron for whites and 5 micron for reds, my filter housings use 2.5 x 10 inch filters, i buy mine by the case on e-bay, one place sells cases of 16 the other sells cases of 25, they run around $1 per filter, and can be washed and reused several times, using K-meta solution, now i keep 25 micron filters for,, from ferment to secondary carboy, , filtering removes no flavor or color,
Dawg
My question is not quite on point, but I cannot find a thread that addresses it. So here goes. I have always filtered (Buon Vino) and bottled on the same day. Recently I heard from a small-scale commercial winemaker (30-33K bottles a year) it is best to wait a day or two between filtering and bottling. I failed to ask for rationale. Any thoughts one way or the other?
 
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hounddawg

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no, i filter at every racking 5 micron for reds and 1 micron for whites, as well i filter , as i bottle as well. now i have never done a grape wine, and most traditional wines are made to taste the same every year, but they must fail or there would not be different vintages that are sought after and cost more,
Dawg
 

Paulietivo

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Buon vino filters state in the instructions that the wine is in an agitated state and its best to wait between filtering and bottling. In other words its not recommended to bottle immediately after filtering.
 

vacuumpumpman

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I also wait to bottle after filtering.
I will filter at racking prior to bottling process , typically within several days I am ready to bottle.
I noticed I may get some additional fallout after filtering. I did ask about this and the answer ,All I got was, it was due to the positive and negative charges being created due to the filtering process.
 

jvbutter

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I did ask about this and the answer ,All I got was, it was due to the positive and negative charges being created due to the filtering process.
Is this a science project? Seems weird. I cant disprove it (not quite that much of a science type) but seems weird, "positive and negative charges"

Yes I too wait to bottle. I have heard some will filter straight into new bottles and cork.
 

JoP

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I use this pump (available from Morewine and others) and the same household filter that Cuz shows in his OP. Filter goes between pump and “final wine destination”. So you are pushing the wine through with positive pressure instead of “sucking” which tends to draw air into the smallest possible leaks. Also, the household filter and tubing fittings are designed for positive pressure, not vacuum which is why they are so difficult to seal in vacuum. View attachment 66485
Do you have a More Wine part number?
Thanks
 

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