Wild Rose Hip Wine - I'm going for it!

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BigDaveK

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"Rosa Canina", the Dog Rose, so called because Hippocrates used the roots to heal the wound from a dog bite. Possibly one of the healthiest and most spiritual ingredients to use for wine.

Spiritually it's associated with love, the Virgin Mary, and emotional healing; as a talisman offering protection from negative energies and also purifying energy fields; and faeries used the hips to make themselves invisible. I haven't seen many faeries so that's proof it works.

Health benefits from the polyunsaturated fats and antioxidants include skin health, reducing arthritis pain, improving heart health, boosting the immune system, possible protection from type 2 diabetes, and as an aid for weight loss. And of course the very high concentration of vitamin C will prevent scurvy, always a concern of mine. 😁 This will be a healthy wine!

The flavor of the hips is tart from the ascorbic acid, surprisingly fruity, and the decision to make wine was made from the very first taste.

It's another invasive plant on the property, difficult to control, and older plants will easily reach 15+ feet into trees.

rose hip 1.jpg

Initially I collected the individual hips as they ripened - time consuming madness! They're small and 3ish lbs are needed for a gallon of wine. Yes, I was having second thoughts. Then I accidentally discovered that when picked red they will continue to ripen to a deep burgundy which made harvesting much easier. I couldn't wait till they were all ripe on the bush because birds love them - I was finding an incredible number of half eaten hips.

rose hip 2.jpg

And we're ready to go!

rose hip 3.jpg

Interesting point - some recipes using dried rose hips call for a 1:4 ratio, dried to fresh, which implies a 75% loss to moisture. My own drying test only reduced the weight by 30% which makes me question all recipes using dried measurements.

The sauerkraut masher came in handy to crush the hips.

rose hip 4.jpg

The hips (3.9 lbs) were steeped in hot water and before adding anything I checked the numbers. The must was tart and the pH came in at 4.01. The hips have sugars - fructose, glucose, sucrose, galactose, lactose, maltose - and the SG was a mind blowing 1.050! No way! Research told me the hips have approximately 3.3 gr of sugar per cup so I calculated sugar to get me around 1.090 though the hydrometer reading was 1.142. I went with 71B, a safe choice for fruit when you can't decide.

The must was delicious during fermentation. Tart with a strong "mystery" berry flavor - familiar but not identifiable. And each day the astringency increased which I assume is attributable to the seeds. And that leads to one drawback: I've read many descriptions that state this wine tastes awful until it's about 2 years old when it transforms into something magical. Two years....sigh....

Transferred to secondary yesterday at 1.022.
Much of the color in the hips come from carotonoids, unstable, so no surprise the burgundy color didn't last.
Explosive flavor - tart, very astringent, and the mystery berry flavor has become an unmistakable strong grapefruit! I truly hope the flavor continues to change because of all the country wines I've had on my list, grapefruit was not one of them.😆

Incredibly, I have enough hips for another gallon. The only change I'm considering so far is yeast choice. Suggestions?

rose hip 5.jpg
 
LOL, I thought I was the only one wanting to knock on @BigDaveK door. I think he needs to host a tasting party 😂
I have more than enough to share. In fact, I was thinking about donating some to the local schools.🤣

And don't show up unannounced. I'm in the country and a strange vehicle on the road means my hands aren't empty. And what I'm holding isn't empty either.😄
 
I wasn't expecting this! The amount of lees after 2 days is amazing and reminds me of my tomato wine. I always oversize my gallon batches 1-2 pints but I'm seriously worried I won't have enough to top up going into bulk.

View attachment 107740
If it’s mostly ground up rose hips just squeeze them through a fine mesh bag and you’ll salvage a lot of wine.
 
How did this turn out? I made rose hip syrup last year and it was delicious so would love to try the wine. Wasn't sure if not heating them first would leave the irritating hairs from the inside though
 
How did this turn out? I made rose hip syrup last year and it was delicious so would love to try the wine. Wasn't sure if not heating them first would leave the irritating hairs from the inside though
I've made rose hip syrup and I agree it's delicious. And rose hip tea is a favorite and usually on the shelf.

Going into bulk the wine had an incredible fruity taste, much better than the tea, for about 1 second - and then it became incredibly bitter and astringent. I fermented with the seeds which I've decided is not the way to go. Live and learn. I dehydrated and removed the seeds from enough hips for a second batch but I haven't started it yet. Taking a break to free up space. BUT that very brief wonderful flavor has made me determined to try again!

Do you know what kind of hips you have? I've watched a couple UK cooking videos and the hips they collect are huge compared to my wild ones. Oh, and I didn't even notice the hairs. I saw them but they had no other affect.

I'll update this thread with rose hip #2 when I finally get it started.
 
I've made rose hip syrup and I agree it's delicious. And rose hip tea is a favorite and usually on the shelf.

Going into bulk the wine had an incredible fruity taste, much better than the tea, for about 1 second - and then it became incredibly bitter and astringent. I fermented with the seeds which I've decided is not the way to go. Live and learn. I dehydrated and removed the seeds from enough hips for a second batch but I haven't started it yet. Taking a break to free up space. BUT that very brief wonderful flavor has made me determined to try again!

Do you know what kind of hips you have? I've watched a couple UK cooking videos and the hips they collect are huge compared to my wild ones. Oh, and I didn't even notice the hairs. I saw them but they had no other affect.

I'll update this thread with rose hip #2 when I finally get it started.
Interesting thank you! I'm not sure what kind we have here, but they were a decent size, maybe 3/4 inch. When I made syrups you didn't have to deseed them though just top and tail them and make an X on with a knife. Sounds like a lot of work deseeding them but i'm sure it'll be worth it for the flavor!
 
Interesting thank you! I'm not sure what kind we have here, but they were a decent size, maybe 3/4 inch. When I made syrups you didn't have to deseed them though just top and tail them and make an X on with a knife. Sounds like a lot of work deseeding them but i'm sure it'll be worth it for the flavor!
Wow, yeah your hips are about 3 times the size of my wild. For my 2nd batch of hips I dehydrated, crushed, put them in a big jar and shook, seeds and hips separating enough to make me happy.

Judging by my experience fermenting with the seeds, I think your separating the seeds will be worth it too. Keep us updated please!
 
"Rosa Canina", the Dog Rose, so called because Hippocrates used the roots to heal the wound from a dog bite. Possibly one of the healthiest and most spiritual ingredients to use for wine.

Spiritually it's associated with love, the Virgin Mary, and emotional healing; as a talisman offering protection from negative energies and also purifying energy fields; and faeries used the hips to make themselves invisible. I haven't seen many faeries so that's proof it works.

Health benefits from the polyunsaturated fats and antioxidants include skin health, reducing arthritis pain, improving heart health, boosting the immune system, possible protection from type 2 diabetes, and as an aid for weight loss. And of course the very high concentration of vitamin C will prevent scurvy, always a concern of mine. 😁 This will be a healthy wine!

The flavor of the hips is tart from the ascorbic acid, surprisingly fruity, and the decision to make wine was made from the very first taste.

It's another invasive plant on the property, difficult to control, and older plants will easily reach 15+ feet into trees.

View attachment 107624

Initially I collected the individual hips as they ripened - time consuming madness! They're small and 3ish lbs are needed for a gallon of wine. Yes, I was having second thoughts. Then I accidentally discovered that when picked red they will continue to ripen to a deep burgundy which made harvesting much easier. I couldn't wait till they were all ripe on the bush because birds love them - I was finding an incredible number of half eaten hips.

View attachment 107625

And we're ready to go!

View attachment 107626

Interesting point - some recipes using dried rose hips call for a 1:4 ratio, dried to fresh, which implies a 75% loss to moisture. My own drying test only reduced the weight by 30% which makes me question all recipes using dried measurements.

The sauerkraut masher came in handy to crush the hips.

View attachment 107627

The hips (3.9 lbs) were steeped in hot water and before adding anything I checked the numbers. The must was tart and the pH came in at 4.01. The hips have sugars - fructose, glucose, sucrose, galactose, lactose, maltose - and the SG was a mind blowing 1.050! No way! Research told me the hips have approximately 3.3 gr of sugar per cup so I calculated sugar to get me around 1.090 though the hydrometer reading was 1.142. I went with 71B, a safe choice for fruit when you can't decide.

The must was delicious during fermentation. Tart with a strong "mystery" berry flavor - familiar but not identifiable. And each day the astringency increased which I assume is attributable to the seeds. And that leads to one drawback: I've read many descriptions that state this wine tastes awful until it's about 2 years old when it transforms into something magical. Two years....sigh....

Transferred to secondary yesterday at 1.022.
Much of the color in the hips come from carotonoids, unstable, so no surprise the burgundy color didn't last.
Explosive flavor - tart, very astringent, and the mystery berry flavor has become an unmistakable strong grapefruit! I truly hope the flavor continues to change because of all the country wines I've had on my list, grapefruit was not one of them.😆

Incredibly, I have enough hips for another gallon. The only change I'm considering so far is yeast choice. Suggestions?

View attachment 107631
This is from an old winemaking book translated from German.
Vierka.jpg
Like Fig, Rose hips rank highest among all winemaking fruits, after grapes, and produce the finest drinks. They can be recommended wholeheartedly to the amateur, giving, as they do, wines that will delight the most fastidious palate!😃
 
This is from an old winemaking book translated from German.
View attachment 110381
Like Fig, Rose hips rank highest among all winemaking fruits, after grapes, and produce the finest drinks. They can be recommended wholeheartedly to the amateur, giving, as they do, wines that will delight the most fastidious palate!😃
That confirms what I learned during my initial research - Germans have high praise for rose hip wine.
 
Rose Hip Wine #2!!

I had to try again since I had so many rose hips. There's no sugar coating here - Rose Hip #1 fermented with the seeds is awful, extremely astringent and bitter. Maybe it will be good some day, maybe, for now I'm ignoring it.

Rose Hip #2 had to be made without the seeds and separating was actually easy - more than 10 lbs of hips were dehydrated, crushed, and a small colander caught almost every seed. My effort gave me 12 oz of hips with virtually no seeds.

The color blew me away, totally unexpected, but it's beginning to lighten as sediment builds. And the flavor? The initial must had a strong cherry flavor which I loved. But my excitement didn't last. As the ferment progressed it tasted like a mix of cherries and prune juice. Transferring to secondary the cherry was almost gone, and not quite prune juice...almost....tamarind?

Multiple surprises with this one and I have no idea where it's going.

20240516_170625.jpg
 

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