What is considered "dry" wine?

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Old Philosopher

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At what SG does one consider their wine to be "dry"?
SG .990-.992 is pretty obvious, but is there a range of dryness?
Are there names for other categories, based upon SG, where where a wine goes from "dry" to what, "wet"?
 

daveklick

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Just out of curiosity, at one point(what stage) is the SG being read when determining if dry or sweet?
 

Old Philosopher

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Ooh, ooh! Lemme answer that, and see if I've learned anything.
Once the SG has stabilized on it's own for about 72 hours, and is no longer dropping, fermentation has stopped. That's the point, where ever it might be on the scale.
 

rob

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Wade,
I never knew the temperture effected the hydrometer reading, I wonder how many people now that
 

daveklick

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Old Philosopher--is that right after secondary fermentation, before you would generally add pot. sorbate?
 

Old Philosopher

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Wade,
I never knew the temperture effected the hydrometer reading, I wonder how many people now that
Not all hydrometers are created equal. Test your own to find the actual "zero" temperature.
 

surlees

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Most wine hydrometers are calibrated for readings at 60F. However, there's only a small variance when read in the 65F-75F range. I usually ignore the difference because I don't consider it critical. This isn't rocket science!

Fred
 

Wade E

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Every hydrometer Ive even seen comes with a temp adjustent chart which also tells you where ground zero is. Like Surless and cpfan has said before, some are set for 60* but some are also 68*. If you dont know yours gt yourself some distilled water and read what it says at 60* in there and then again at 68* whichever one reads 1.000 is most likely where you should be checking your wine at.
 

Old Philosopher

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Most wine hydrometers are calibrated for readings at 60F. However, there's only a small variance when read in the 65F-75F range. I usually ignore the difference because I don't consider it critical. This isn't rocket science!

Fred
I still have some technical questions, but thanks to the folks here, the mystery of wine/cider making is gone, for me.
No, it's not rocket science, and you can make wine basically out of anything that won't poison you.
Juice/fruit + water + sugar + yeast + time = wine. Anything beyond that depends upon how anal you want to be about the process.
 

rob

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well it will mean the difference between 10 percent and 12 percent wine, I guess your right, after 3 or 4 glasses it won't matter.
 

Old Philosopher

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Wade, I'm a little confused about the temperature conversion on that link. It says the difference between 60F and 68F on the hydrometer is "add 1.0". Humm... So if you take a reading at 60F and your hydrometer tells you 1.000, you're good. But if you take your reading at 68F, you need to add 1.0 to your reading. So at 68F, if you get a reading of 1.000, you're supposed to add 1.0 to get the actual reading. That would be 2.000.
I think I'm really confused on what that number in the table means, 'cause that's stupid.
 

St Allie

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Nothing to add to this thread except..

hey OP!.. I have missed you..

Allie
 

mmadmikes1

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well it will mean the difference between 10 percent and 12 percent wine, I guess your right, after 3 or 4 glasses it won't matter.
It will matter if you plan to age a wine and % is to low, the wine wont age well with low alcohol
 

Slyder73

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Wade, I'm a little confused about the temperature conversion on that link. It says the difference between 60F and 68F on the hydrometer is "add 1.0". Humm... So if you take a reading at 60F and your hydrometer tells you 1.000, you're good. But if you take your reading at 68F, you need to add 1.0 to your reading. So at 68F, if you get a reading of 1.000, you're supposed to add 1.0 to get the actual reading. That would be 2.000.
I think I'm really confused on what that number in the table means, 'cause that's stupid.
Just looked at the chart on temperature conversions from that link and it does not make sense to me either. It appears as maybe it's a decimal place error in the entire section under the "CORRECT" row? In fact a few of the charts are complete nonsense. The last one on there, gives "Wine Additives" in teaspoons per ounce. It suggests 15 teaspoons per ounce of Calcium Carbonate? Or Polyclar at 27 teaspoons per ounce? They must be using those teeny tiny Alice in Wonderland spoons after the shrinking potion.... Dont' use any charts on that site, as the accuracy of any of them will be very questionable.
 
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Old Philosopher

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Slyder, I was only looking at one chart in the beginning. Looking closer, I see what you mean.
Luc has a .pdf file on his blog which is what I've been using. I'll continue to trust his figures.
 

rob

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It will matter if you plan to age a wine and % is to low, the wine wont age well with low alcohol
I diagree, I am currently making a sov. blanc and I was told (Midwest Wine) that at 1.00 is perfect for that wine.
 

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