Walnut Wine?

Discussion in 'Country Fruit Winemaking' started by Yeasty Boy, Aug 24, 2018.

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  1. Aug 24, 2018 #1

    Yeasty Boy

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    My neighbor has a walnut tree and a plethora of walnuts. Last night we were wondering if we could make wine out of walnuts and he thought he had tried some walnut port while he was in Europe somewhere.
    Anyone tried this or have a recipe?
     
  2. Aug 24, 2018 #2

    Scooter68

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    I guess you could. At the risk of being blunt. Just because you can doesn't always mean you should. It might be fantastic or maybe those walnuts could be used in something else. Are they black walnuts? Around here we gather them up and sell them. Last year we got $16.50 Per hundred weight hulled. (Over the years I've see prices as low at $4.00/100weight in the 70s and in recent years as high as $22.00/100weight The buyers provide the hulling machine you just bring the walnuts. Of course here in NW Arkansas we have a lot of walnut trees.

    I hope you have figured out an efficient way to hull, crack and pick out the meat. That's tough work. And they are easy compared to Hickory Nuts. THOSE are some sweet and rich nuts, once you get to the edible parts.
     
  3. Aug 24, 2018 #3

    Yeasty Boy

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    They are Black Walnuts. My neighbor is retired and has a shop where he tinkers so he has them shelled. I found ways to make Walnut Liquor with green walnuts but i would have to wait until spring. Maybe I will just throw them in a gallon carboy with some sugar and yeast and see what happens. Do i use the shell or the meat? I think he said the wine he had was made with the shells but you would think there would be more flavor, oils, and natural sugars in the meat. Maybe I will try a jug of each. You can ferment anything! Right?!
     
  4. Aug 24, 2018 #4

    Scooter68

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    I don't know what the shell could contribute to the taste. The hulls of course are use for medicinal purposes but would ruin a wine I suspect. That would be one reason to avoid the shells unless they are perfectly clean. Of course getting 100% of the meat out of the shell is trick so I can why using the shells would have some appeal.

    Hopefully someone with experience in walnut wine or nut wines can pop in and help you more.
     
  5. Aug 25, 2018 #5

    Stressbaby

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    Your problem will probably be the oil. It can be done but it's tricky. Look for old threads on almond wine.
     
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  6. Aug 25, 2018 #6

    salcoco

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  7. Sep 4, 2018 #7

    Vinobeau

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    I've never tried nut wines, but I would like to! Actually, I'm going to make it this fall.
    Here is Jack Keller's recipe and notes:

    Walnut Wine

    Pecans, hazelnuts, peanuts, brazil nuts, cashews, pistachio nuts, and most other nuts are inappropriate for making wine because their oils go rancid before the wine is finished, but almonds and walnuts can be used in making wine.

    • 2 oz walnuts
    • 12 oz raisins
    • 1 lb 12 oz. granulated sugar
    • Rind and juice of 1 lemon, 1 orange, 1 grapefruit
    • 7 pts water
    • 1 tsp yeast nutrient
    • 1 sachet wine yeast
    Chop the walnuts and raisins and add to 1 quart water with citrus rinds (no pith). Bring to simmer, cover and hold simmer for 30 minutes. Strain and discard solids and dissolve sugar in liquid. Allow to cool and pour into primary with remaining water. Add citrus juice, yeast nutrient and yeast as an activated starter. Cover with sanitized cloth or lid and set in warm place. Ferment to specific gravity of 1.020, transfer to secondary and fit airlock. Ferment to dryness, wait 2 weeks, rack and add one crushed and dissolved Campden tablet. Reattach airlock and refrigerate or place in bucket of crushed ice until white beads of solidified oil form on surface. Gently strain through fine muslin cloth back into secondary to remove beads. Reattach airlock and age 6 months, racking every two months and adding crushed Campden at 4-month racking. Stabilize, sweeten slightly if desired, wait 30 days, and bottle. Age 2-3 additional months before tasting. Improves to two years. [Author's own recipe]

    I
     
  8. Sep 4, 2018 #8

    gabe

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    Since you say they are black walnuts you could make an appertife called NOCINO. Slightly bitter but known to be a digestive. Easy to find recepie on the web & rather simple to make.
    Gabe
     

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