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Using Bangalore Blue Grape for wine making

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I did the primary fermentation of the grape with less sugar.
Now it is past two month, I have the wine put it in a second fermented vessle.

Question I have: Wine is looking acidic ie hydrometer show reading of 60
Ph meter show reading of 1
PH paper shows of 1

How can I save this wine
or I have missed up this batch of winemaking.

Please suggest

thanks
 

1d10t

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Hydrometer. 1.060 maybe? The hydrometer isn't an indication of acidity. It is fermentable sugars. 1.060 would indicate incomplete primary fermentation. What was your starting reading?

pH of 1? I don't think that is possible. Is it very acrid when you smell it? I couldn't suggest you taste it in case that reading is correct. I'm no expert but expect that would cause physical harm and would have probably etched your carboys if you used glass.
 
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I have not taking inital reading. I brough hydrometer and PH meter when I saw my wine started tasting acidic.
Tomorrow, I will recaribate my PH meter, and check my hydrometer reading and put the picture of it.
 

stickman

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From what I could find online, Bangalore Blue typically has high acidity, usually over 1%, possibly 10 to 12g/l, so some deacidification may be needed to make the wine palatable.
 

ibglowin

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I was looking for that info as well and didn't find it. That is a boatload of acid for a grape that is supposedly a relative of the Concord grape.
 

stickman

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I didn't find much, but this is a clip from one article;

"A mixed culture fermentation process using a combination of Schizosaccharomyces pombe and S. cerevisiae (10:90), reduces the acidity in wines prepared from Bangalore Blue grapes from over 1 per cent to less than 0.79 per cent, consequently producing acceptable quality wine with optimum acidity."

Maybe just using something simple like 71B yeast would help to reduce malic acid, though it may not reduce it enough.
 

tradowsk

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At a pH of 1, you're between lemon juice and battery acid, so I would be hesitant to trust that reading. Paper strips only work reliably with clear liquids. I would recalibrate your pH meter and test it again.

As for the hydrometer, you still have a good deal of sugar in there, but if your must is too acidic your yeast may be struggling.

If it's too acidic, I would add some additional fruit juice from either a different grape or a low acid fruit (perhaps apple) to cut the acidity. You're fermentation is still ongoing so keep the yeast happy and probably under airlock at this point.
 

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