Triple Berry Wine

Winemaking Talk - Winemaking Forum

Help Support Winemaking Talk - Winemaking Forum:

vinny

Mildly Amused
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 19, 2022
Messages
820
Reaction score
1,796
Location
Central Alberta
Good day all.

I made a 2 gallon batch of triple berry (blueberry, blackberry, and raspberry) with the intention of racking to 2 seperate gallon jugs and playing with them to get an understanding of flavors.

Well, I racked to seperate jugs and made 5 more wines instead of playing with this one. I am wondering if I'm best to just let it age. Too late to mess with acids or tannins?

Should I oak one. Any other interesting suggestions?

I was looking for comparable recipes to see how long people were aging similar wines and saw one post about suggestions of recipes for 1 gallon triple berry and 2 months later he commented that it was soooo good, and got drank way to fast.

The recipe is similar to Dragon's Blood. How long should I age it? Any tweeks I can do between the 2 to learn a thing or 2 about flavors?

The recipe. Just so you know where it's at. I left out acid blend with the intention of adding to one jug to identify the changes.

1 gallon water
8 lbs berry mix
1 tbsp peptic enzyme
1/2 tsp energizer
1 tsp nutrient
5 1/4 cup sugar + 600 grams inverted sugar
water to 8 litres
sg 1.082

It was racked a month ago, air locks are still up and I don't think I even added K-meta. Unless I just forgot to write it in my notes, but I doubt it. All the other wines have rack, k-meta, and sorbate dates noted.
 

Scooter68

Fruit "Wine" Maker
Joined
Aug 29, 2015
Messages
4,029
Reaction score
3,368
Location
Northwest Arkansas
I've made a triple berry wine with Wild Blackberries, Wild Black Raspberries and domestic Red Raspberries. Turned out fantastic. As to tannin, I would not worry about it. Aging - I'd go at least 6-9 months to let the edges round off. Other than that, I'd just rack every 3 months and add K-meta at those rackings. Back-sweetening will really bring out the flavor but it's not necessary to make it a sweet wine by doing that.
 
Top