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Primary Fermentation Temp

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jtmayo

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I'm fermenting my first batch of World Vineyard Sangiovese in my basement and it is hovering around 65 degrees. Will this temp kill the yeast or prolong my primary fermentation?
 

The_Zymurgist

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Depends on the yeast strain used. Do you have any idea what strain you used? Wine, like beer can be fermented at both High (top fermenting) and Low (bottom fermenting) temperatures. If you do see the fermentation getting slow, you can also use Lalvin EC-1118 to kick it back into gear.

Bests,
The_Zymurgist
 

cpfan

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I'm fermenting my first batch of World Vineyard Sangiovese in my basement and it is hovering around 65 degrees. Will this temp kill the yeast or prolong my primary fermentation?
Hopefully it will just prolong the fermentation. But it would be best if you could up the temperature. Will you be able to get it warm enough for degassing?

Steve
 
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robie

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A higher temperature will help. Don't try adding EC-1118 yeast just yet, though, that will not be necessary unless your fermentation gets completely stuck and that's not likely.

The wine might still ferment out OK at that low temperature, but if it does, it will take several more days to reach dry and your chances of having a stuck fermentation are higher.

Do you have a brew belt? It is a heating belt that is made to go around a fermentor bucket to keep it warm. If not, you really need to raise the temperature in the room to around 75 F, until the fermentation itself heats the wine.

Some people use electric blankets or heating pads to heat the bucket, but that sort of scares me!!! Maybe someone else on this forum can tell you how to use them safely. Try it at your own risk.
 

jtmayo

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Fermentation Temp

I can boost the temp by use of a space heater, and I will. I used the yeast that came with the pack, Red something, and did not stir, as advised, so I assume it is a top fermenting yeast that needs to be 70 degrees.

I will hook up the space heater and relax and have a homebrew.

Thanks for all the great information and timely responses.

Mayo
 

Wade E

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I dont like taking the chance with wines that I really want to be as dry as I can get it like a Sangiovese so get the temps up so that you dont have problems. I mostly worry about getting it going and finishing it up, in the middle of fermentation it almost never has a problem, its those other 2 areas that can get you into trouble. I would get a brew belt if I were you or just find a warmer area to ferment, degas, and clear your wine. After that Cool, dark, and stable is the best.
EDIT: You brew beer also? There are a few of us here that do.
 

jtmayo

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Primary temps

I did two batches of beer ten years ago and I loved it. I want to do it again and wonder if it is feasible to use the same equipment?

I have moved the space heater and if need be, I will move the bucket of wine upstairs for more optimal temps.

So, same equip, or be safe and use different?

Mayo
 

djrockinsteve

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Hey move the buckets into the shower with you. Not only will you warm it up you have a nice seat.

I'm not serious though. Just don't put a space heater too close to your bucket. Grt it off the floor if you can. Wrap a blanket around it, place it near a heater vent. etc.
 

The_Zymurgist

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I agree, get it off the floor if you can. An old milk cart works great for this, as it allows wam air to completely surround the primary. Your going to want to get it back up to temp. EC-1118 is an absolute LAST ditch effort, especially if your going for an extra dry wine. Until then it's all temp, temp, temp!!!
 

Wade E

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Welcome Zymur, Glad to have you aboard and it looks like you know what your doing and we can always use a few more here that do and dont.

JT, I would get a separate primary for the beer but it can be done, Ive actually done it a few times before I bought one for beer alone even though I never tasted a one in another. Everything else will be fine equipment wise. Get yourself some Starsan or Iodophor for the beer sanitation.
 

jtmayo

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Is it good?

Again, thanks for all the help. I've had the primary fermenter on a kitchen counter in a basement apartment, just moved an oil filled radiator style space heater near it. I pitched two days ago and have the lid on loose with a vacuum lock in the grommet hole - so far no bubbles. I'm not sure if I should have bubbles with the lid laying on it like it is. I took a look and there's movement in the wine and a sound that I can't really describe - very slight sound like a a thousand cicadas a long way away. I assume this is the yeast getting active? If it isn't, do I have a problem yet?
 

jtmayo

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Duh!

So I slapped the lid down tight and the lock went crazy. I guess that answers my question. Duh!
 

sirden1959

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turning the heat up....

I use a pet warmer, like a heating pad it's about 12" x 18". It will keep my primary fermenter bucket at about 72 to 74 temp. Just plug it into a wall outlet. Works great, I got mine at a farm/ranch supply store for $40.00.
 

robie

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It's a little early to slap the lid down tight. In the first stage of fermentation (aerobic fermentation), the yeast need some oxygen to do their job. It is after you move the wine to the carboy for the second stage of fermentation (anaerobic fermentation) that the yeast do not need/want oxygen.

I would just set the lid loosely on top of the bucket and cover the air lock hole with a paper towel. I also would open the lid once or twice a day until about day 4 or 5. (You might even enjoy the sight and aroma when you do.)

Lots of wine makers just lock the lid down on day one and leave it that way until they move the wine to secondary fermentation or until the wine is completely dry. To each his own, as they say. If it works for them, what can one say? However, if you get the rotten egg smell it is often because the yeast are starved for oxygen.

If you have any concerns about this, take a look at "fermentation Stages" in this article:
http://www.eckraus.com/wine-making-101.html
 

jtmayo

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What about contaminants?

I've locked it down with an airlock, reopened it, locked it down again, reopened it, etc...I'm worried about contamination. If it's just laying on their with an airlock inserted, is this an issue?

I am actually enjoying watching it bubble, smelling it when I open the basement door, etc...

Also, does it need to be stirred in primary? Or, should I just relax and have a homebrew?

Thanks
 
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