Quantcast

Lalvin 71B-1122 for an apple wine.

Wine Making Talk

Help Support Wine Making Talk:

m_lapaglia

Member
Joined
Sep 10, 2007
Messages
58
Reaction score
0
I want to use Lalvin 71B-1122 in this recipe The EC-1118 stops at about 18% ABV and the 1122 at 14%. It is supposed to allow more of the fruit aroma and flavor come through.

Apple Wine

Yields one gallon

1 gallon Fresh Apple Cider
1 tsp. Yeast Nutrient
Sugar (add sugar to get 1.090-1.095 sg. If juice is 1.065 you need about 10 oz to get to 1.095 sg)
1 crushed Campden Tablet
1.5 tsp. Acid Blend
1 package Wine Yeast EC-1118
.5 tsp. Pectic Enzyme
.25 tsp. Grape Tannin

It will top out at about 14% ABV. I am wondering if I hit the level where the alcohol stops the yeast can I sweeten it without adding a sulfite or whatever it is I would use to stop the fermentation. I don't plan to bottle carb at all. So If I add small amounts of additional sugar when it hits 0.998 sg and it doesn't ferment anymore in a week can I assume that its safe to sweeten to taste and bottle once it clears?

(did that make any sense?)
 

Sacalait

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2006
Messages
804
Reaction score
8
I've never done that (guess I'm just chicken) because I'd be afraid that at some point after bottling it might crank up again. I've had my share of spills to clean up caused from blown corks. If you try it just place the bottled wine in a plastic storage bin just in case.:p ;)
 

Luc

Dutch Winemaker
Joined
Nov 5, 2006
Messages
1,615
Reaction score
33
Personally I think that 14% is far to high for an apple wine.

High alcohol and high acid together with the delicate
flavor of apple will give rocket fuel.

I make mine never above 11%

Luc
 

m_lapaglia

Member
Joined
Sep 10, 2007
Messages
58
Reaction score
0
Personally I think that 14% is far to high for an apple wine.

High alcohol and high acid together with the delicate
flavor of apple will give rocket fuel.

I make mine never above 11%

Luc
Valid point, Its why I asked here.:D

So if I start at with an OG of about 1.075 and ferment to dry (0.997 ish) that should get me about 10.5%. I can stabilize instead of trying to be clever if I want to back sweeten.

Will the Lalvin 71B-1122 be a good choice as a yeast? Its supposed to leave more of the aroma and flavor of the fruit than the EC-1118. Lalvin says, "71B is known for making blush and semi-sweet wines and owes its success to its abilities to produce amyl ester (isoamyl acetate), reinforcing the aromatic profile of wines". As a newbie this sounds great and means very little. Id like to end up with an apple wine that retains the aroma and as much as the flavor as makes sense.

So 71B-1122, yes, no? K1V-1116? EC-1118?
 

moose-1110

Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2008
Messages
31
Reaction score
0
I am new to wine making but I would just suggest trying both yeast and see what you like. As I keep seeing on these boards experiment is the best way to fine a wine that you like.
 

Wine Maker

Rocco
Joined
Jun 9, 2007
Messages
166
Reaction score
0
I made apple wine for the first time and used Cotes De Blanc. I am pleased with how the wine came out. Very subtle apple flavor, which is what I was aiming for. I don't know if a different yeast would have given me more apple flavor though. My initial brix was 14 so I brought it up to 21 to get about an 11% wine. I fermented dry and did not sweeten.
 

Benjo's Mom

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2008
Messages
57
Reaction score
0
Wow, this was great timing. I went to the orchard and got 5 gallons of cider to make a batch of apple wine. I started it today and it had already started to ferment a bit in the jugs, but I still got an OG of 1.075. I will plan to ferment to .999-.997 for a dry wine. My questions were 1. (answered) what yeast to use? I was debating between the the Cotes de Blancs and Premier Cuvee. Guess it will be Cotes de Blancs and I will pitch it tomorrow. My other question 2. is, my tannin is bunching up in clots. Is this normal and what should I do about it? Thanks.
 

Sacalait

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2006
Messages
804
Reaction score
8
I guess I am looking for anyone here that has used the 71B. How did it fair. I know the only way to be sure is to try. I am just looking for info first.
I use 71B 80% of the time. Obviously I've been pleased with it. The wines I've made using it are Fig, Blackberry, Muscadine, Blueberry, A combination of the three, and Hibiscus.
 

stormryter

Junior
Joined
Oct 31, 2013
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
This is from homebrewtalk .com
"ALL apples naturally contain malic & ascorbic acids in varying amounts & ratios. And yes, your juice should ferment just fine, as long as there are no sorbates in it. Also, IF you want to reduce the malic acid in your end product, you can use the 71B-1122 (narbonne) yeast from Lalvin, it will metabolize some (not all) of the malic acid & turn it into alcohol/CO2. This will result in less tart-ness & make for a "softer" finish & mouthfeel. Hope you find this info useful. Regards, GF.
I am starting a batch with 71-B right now.
 

BernardSmith

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2011
Messages
3,213
Reaction score
1,323
Location
Saratoga Springs
I use 71B in almost everything I make. I think it brings out the kind of fruitiness I like. From mazers I know they argue that if you use 71B you should not allow the wine to sit on the lees for any significant amount of time. I tend to rack every couple of months so that is not really a problem for me. One thing I do know is that apple wine made with this yeast is transformed after about a year (I think because the malic changes to lactic acid) and wine becomes incredibly smooth. To Sacalait's list I would add elderflower. Mind you I have only ever made elderflower using 71B and each time it has been very drinkable. I am planning on making a batch using QA-23 (Lavlin) which has recently been packaged for the home wine maker.
 

C2H6O

Junior
Joined
Mar 10, 2014
Messages
3
Reaction score
4
I use 71B-1122 for Apple wine. The only thing with the yeast is that it tends to produce more H2S when it gets stressed. Need to keep your nose to the must during fermentation. I add Yeast Nutrient to the must (can you call Apple Juice must?) in increments. Usually starting at about 50-60% up front and adding as needed through out. The worst H2S problem I had was remedied with splash racking. The wine was smooth but I actually had to add some acid blend because the tartness you look for in an apple wine is dimished by the yeasts ability to ferment Malic Acid which is naturaly high in Apples.
 

GreginND

Super Moderator
Super Moderator
Joined
Mar 18, 2012
Messages
3,664
Reaction score
1,993
Location
Fargo, ND
Um, this thread is 6 years old. I suspect the original poster has already drank the wine by now. :)

Good information, though. I used 71B this year for apple and it turned out great. Would never count on it to stop at 14%. My 25.5 brix MN 1200 fermented out completely with 71B.
 

C2H6O

Junior
Joined
Mar 10, 2014
Messages
3
Reaction score
4
Um, this thread is 6 years old. I suspect the original poster has already drank the wine by now. :)

Good information, though. I used 71B this year for apple and it turned out great. Would never count on it to stop at 14%. My 25.5 brix MN 1200 fermented out completely with 71B.
Yeah never hurts...


Sent from my HTC_Amaze_4G using Wine Making mobile app
 

jswordy

Wonderful WINO
Joined
Jan 12, 2012
Messages
4,792
Reaction score
4,350
I always use 71B1122 for apple. It works well. It makes a good dry apple wine if you can wait a year or so to age it. I usually back sweeten mine. If you do, it is smart to use potassium sorbate to prevent refermenttation.

The alternative is to naturally kill the yeast off by bulk aging it for a long period - a year or more - then back sweeten, then test for refermentation and bottle, and age it another several months. If I was going bulk age it a year, I'd just bottle it dry.
 

Latest posts

Top