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Celestyal

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Newbie here, i know that grapes aren't in season but i was wondering where the best place to buy grapes for a red wine. There kinda pricey at the store (even in season) so any help will be nice thanks.:spm
 

Minnesotamaker

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If you're just starting out, you'll likely be better off making wine from a wine kit. I teach some wine-making classes and I tell my students this: If you were trying to teach a kid (baking for the first time) how to make a cake, you'd start them off with a cake mix rather than trying to teach them to make one from scratch. If they follow the directions, they're almost sure to get a decent cake out of the experience. Once they master the equipment, terminology, techniques, etc. then they can try making cakes from scratch.

The wine kits are made from grapes; actual wine grapes. They've been pressed for you already so you get the juice without all the trouble and mess. There are lots of styles to choose from and the prices vary based on the kit. Once you make a few kits and have some bottles of wine in your cellar to enjoy, then you'll have something to sip on as you explore the adventure of sourcing good grapes and processing them into wine.
Good luck,
 

Runningwolf

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I agree with Lon. Another option is check with the wineries in your area and they may they the juice already pressed and they will guide you through with what you need to do. Also check your produce companies as a lot of them are getting chilean grape juice in this month.
 

Tom

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1st you can not get WINE grapes from the store. The only place is @ a winery or a distributor of wine grapes/juices.
As above its best to start with a kit to know the steps and equipment. Wine from grapes are more step and equipment.
Oh yea you need the 3 "P's"
Patience
Patience
Patience
Good luck keep us informed
 

djrockinsteve

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I agree with Tom, you can't get "wine" grapes from the store. These grapes were picked ages ago and haven't reached maturity yet. You wine will be nothing but crap. Thompson grapes are cheap and always found at the store because all you can do with these is eat them. They make a terrible wine.

I have 5 grape vines in my back yard and last year I had my wife do a taste test with my grapes and store bought. A huge difference. Fresh ripe grapes are busting with juice and flavor. When's the last time you had that at the local supermarket......? Never!

Try a kit, concentrate or maybe you can get some fresh juice from Chile this month. Call some of the produce houses near you and see if they have any coming in and will they have a few extra. They usually order by the pallet and will get some extra.

We can help you whatever your decision.
 

Celestyal

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If you were trying to teach a kid (baking for the first time) how to make a cake, you'd start them off with a cake mix rather than trying to teach them to make one from scratch. If they follow the directions, they're almost sure to get a decent cake out of the experience. Once they master the equipment, terminology, techniques, etc. then they can try making cakes from scratch.
Maybe i should have put it in my first post, i do have some brewing experince. My apologies. Not to be rude, but everyone i know teaches their children to bake from scratch (including myself when i was kid) no matter what the product is starting from the first time they try it. So i guess for me the idea of kit is a little too simple. I would like a challange. So i guess i'll be a little more clear in the future...

Thank you Tom and djrockinsteve, for answering my question.
 

Minnesotamaker

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Maybe i should have put it in my first post, i do have some brewing experince. My apologies. Not to be rude, but everyone i know teaches their children to bake from scratch (including myself when i was kid) no matter what the product is starting from the first time they try it. So i guess for me the idea of kit is a little too simple. I would like a challange. So i guess i'll be a little more clear in the future...

Thank you Tom and djrockinsteve, for answering my question.
No offense taken. If you're up for the challenge and like the scratch method; no problem. I was thinking that you were very new to this.

I agree that you can teach children to cook from scratch right from the start; but that often involves the newbie working side by side with the coach; it makes for a wonderful experience for both parties as they create and share the results. I was thinking you were a newbie, therefore, suggesting that you try to accomplish the same scratch experience through an Internet thread seemed impractical; that's why I suggested the kit. A kit puts you on a defined path and many winemakers on this forum would be able to assist you with questions based on the kit's known elements and procedures. Without using the kit, you may get questions about the grape's brix, p.h., TA, or free SO2 levels. With a kit, these elements have already been measured and adjusted.

There are experienced wine makers (including me) who still make kits alongside their scratch wines. Kits are a wonderful and affordable way for any home winemaker to open their winemaking process to a wide variety of gapes sourced from around the globe. You'll never get a selection like that at a local vineyard or grocery store. I have a high respect for the kit manufacturers and their products.

Anyway, welcome to the forum, and above all, have fun. It can be a challenge, but I think that's what keeps so many of us immersed so deeply in the hobby. Cheers.
 

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