gravity~vs~sweetness

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T_Baggins

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So is there a direct correlation between SG and "sweetness?"
I understand that SG tells me what the available sugars are for
fermentation. What i want to know is, if I aim for a particular FG,
will sweetness be the same no matter the OG? Is there a chart
or a scale that will give me an idea like say 1-10 on how sweet a
given FG will taste?
 

Julie

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You can try and aim for a particular gravity at the end but to be honest, it's is a gamble on whether or not you achieve it. You are better off fermenting to dry and then backsweetening, this way you have total control on your sweet level.
 

T_Baggins

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You can try and aim for a particular gravity at the end but to be honest, it's is a gamble on whether or not you achieve it. You are better off fermenting to dry and then backsweetening, this way you have total control on your sweet level.
That's all good and dandy for most wines, I am planning on a very high gravity mead, but I want it to finish on the sweet side. Also, I did not post in the mead section because this question is about gravity and sweetness, I figured I'd get more views/answers here :h
 

DoctorCAD

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Stopping any active fermentation for the home winemaker is practically impossible. Let it finish and stabilize and backsweeten.
 

GreginND

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The problem with any non-dry wine is that the perception of sweetness depends highly on the fruit flavors and the acids. You can't predict taste by percent sugar alone.
 

T_Baggins

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The problem with any non-dry wine is that the perception of sweetness depends highly on the fruit flavors and the acids. You can't predict taste by percent sugar alone.

ok, so based on honey...what say you?
 

T_Baggins

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Stopping any active fermentation for the home winemaker is practically impossible. Let it finish and stabilize and backsweeten.
the idea is to get the OG where I want it and let the yeast burn out before it can dry out.
 

DoctorCAD

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the idea is to get the OG where I want it and let the yeast burn out before it can dry out.
Still a crap shoot. You can't control the yeast well enough to even make an educated guess as to where it is going to start and stop. Look at the ranges of yeast, they are typically in the 4 to 5% range. To say one is going to quit at exactly 1.002 is not going to happen.
 

Arne

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the idea is to get the OG where I want it and let the yeast burn out before it can dry out.
You can easily do that, but to predict where it will stop at is not going to be easy. There are always variables that will make the yeast stop or keep on going. If the yeast stops and it is not sweet enough, you can always add a little more honey. If it is too sweet, your choices are to thin it down with some water or whatever you choose for a athinner and try and restart the ferment. When/if you get it restarted where will it stop? I don't know, the other option you have is to make another like wine, use less honey so it will ferment dry and blend it back with the too sweet wine. Our best option for sweetness on home made wines is to ferment dry, stabalize and sweeten it back to where you want it. You will cut the abv. just a little, but if you make it a bit strong to start, it should be fine and keep you happy. Good luck with it, Arne.
 

BernardSmith

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You are also talking about the perception of sweetness and that perception will depend on a number of factors including how sweet you like your wines; how "clean" your fermentation was - If you create a great deal of fusels then the heat of that alcohol may require more residual sugar for that to be offset, how acidic the mead is:. If the honey is more acidic then that acidity will require more sweetness to counter balance that. But I may prefer a differently balanced mead than you. In short , I cannot imagine that there is some kind of graph that maps ABV and acidity (both pH and TA!) and final gravity to everyone's perceived sweetness...
 

NorCal

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It's risky, but if I had to do it as you described, I would continue to add honey until the environment becomes too toxic (alcohol) for the yeast to ferment and was at the desired sweetness. I would then let it sit in bulk for 6 months at 70 degrees with proper SO2 levels. Still a possibility of having bottle bombs after you bottle it, but I think the risk is reduced significantly once it demonstrates long term stability in bulk.
 

stickman

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As others have already said, the process of allowing the fermentation to stop due to alcohol content is variable and you have to live with the results, but there are many people that have developed recipes based on trial and error. Most of the recipes I've seen use specific yeast with known alcohol tolerance to determine approximately where the fermentation will stop, but the repeatability will be dependent on everything, ingredients, yeast nutrients, and even the winemaker.

Sample recipe
http://www.northernbrewer.com/documentation/meadkits/ArtisanalGeneric5.pdf
 

T_Baggins

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well, it sounds like I'm going have to apply what theory and calculations I can and just go for it. ::
 

Whitehrs

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well, it sounds like I'm going have to apply what theory and calculations I can and just go for it. ::
Run with it. Mead is fun. I made a few and found that with the lack other flavors, the high ABV the mead I made was not what I thought it would be. In other words, if you can stabilize, and stop it at about 10 ABV it will be really nice. AT about 14 to 15 mine was straight rocket fuel, and as of 8 months in it is still rocket fuel. the Raw Alcohol taste is still very strong. Just my experience.
I do say try it you will probably different results than I have.
 

opus345

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When i was making mead, I read about using pasturization to stop fermentation, but never tried it.
 

drainsurgeon

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I agree with DrCad and Arnie. It's just about impossible to predict what your final sweetness will be by overloading the sugar content at the beginning. May I ask what your objection to fermenting to dry and then back sweetening is? By doing it this way you control both the alcohol level and how sweet the wine will be. Total control. 100%.

I guess I'm not a very good gambler. :r
 

Whitehrs

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know I have no object to it. I has served me well in the last 8 months.. Just like experimenting.
 

T_Baggins

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I wouldn't really say I object to it. I just think it's a good thing to have the ability to NOT simply
shoot in the dark and hope for the best.
 

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