Other Estimated "Value" of homemade Vino

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Bmd2k1

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as a relatively new home vintner - having started my 1st batch in Oct2020, I've often pondered the "value" of a bottle of my homemade vinos - compared to store bought options.

I'm curious what others views on this is? (I realize that higher end kits should typically have a greater potential value than low enders, typically with age comes more "perceived" value, etc).

Fun convo to have me thinks!

Away we go!

Cheers!
 
Of course one can only offer their own opinion since taste is a very subjective matter. With that said I can offer mine, I’d stack most of my red wines up to bottles that sell commercially for $80, that being the most I’ve ever paid for a commercial wine and not very often do I spend that much. $20-$50 is more typical for my wallet. Considering it costs me not even 1/10 of that $80 to make my own I’d say the cost value to me is up to say $70-ish but that is not factoring in equipment costs.
On the other hand, I am tickled pink to be able to make wine as good as some of my batches turn out. Some are really really good wines, not trying to brag here and I can’t say every single batch is like that and all so far are at least pleasant drinking, but it’s hard to put a value on those successes. Pride in a job well done can be priceless!
 
I make mostly fruit country wines with raw material sourced from my property. I estimate a cost per bottle around .60 (or less) with the cork being the single most expensive component. I've never thought about it's value. The fun I'm having is priceless. And when I walk through the wine section in a store I smile and think, "I make my own."
 
For me, the FWK wines have really altered my perceptions. I have never felt like my premium WE or RJS kits ever matched a good ($20+) commercial wine. Or if they did, it took 2+ yrs of aging to get there. So I started gravitation to making mostly frozen musts. But since the FWK release, I am now making mostly kits again and that is because even at early age, I can enjoy them and they taste as good or better than commercial wines all while being much lower cost than the frozen musts. I can't wait to see how a FWK tastes after 1 -2 yrs in bottle!!
 
"How much is this worth?" is an impossible question. Many moons ago I got into Burgundy (Pinot Noir), which is a fantastic way to piss away money on crappy wines.

I went to TotalWine today, and purchased 2 cases of wine. I buy 3 bottles of each wine, and used online ratings to decide what to buy. All the wines I purchased were in the 85-89 range (superior) or 90-92 range (wow), and after discounts none cost more than $15, and one was $8. It's easy to spend $50 USD on a bottle that isn't as good as the $8 bottles I purchased.

My worst wines are in the 80-84 range, which means they have good varietal character. Most are in the 85-89 range, which means they are above average, and a few surpassed 90 (seriously wow).

My recommendation is to consider the quality of your wines, NOT the equivalent price tag. If you're making 85-89 wines? You're kicking butt!
 
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This is an interesting subject. I do not consider myself and expert, I don’t do anything that involves anything complicated and I just make 6 gallon batches that I age for 2 years or more.
I have never compared my wine with commercial wine but friends often wish to buy mine (I never sell) saying mine beats any they have purchased. Note that I doubt that my friends buy any $50 wines.
For me my wines a very valuable for several reasons:
1. I know what I like and that’s what I make and I know it will be good.
2. I really don’t enjoy buying a wine and being disappointed so I never have to do that.
3. It is priceless to see my guests enjoying what I have made.
 
$11.37 per bottle ; ) But seriously, it doesn't matter how good my wine is, when I used to buy wine I averaged between $10-$11 per bottle and that's all I'm willing to spend so that's all my wine is worth. I grow my own grapes so I spend a lot of time working on them. I enjoy it, it is a stress reliever to come home and check out the vines, trim a branch here or there, sit down and just watch them grow ; ).

I bet I spend over 200 hours per year working on the vines and making wine (about 150 bottles last year), if I spent that time on my real job I'd be way ahead. So either it is worth $11.37 or costs me over $100 a bottle assuming I could get an additional 100+ hours of billable time.

I'd rather spend the time in garden then in the office.
 
Of course one can only offer their own opinion since taste is a very subjective matter. With that said I can offer mine, I’d stack most of my red wines up to bottles that sell commercially for $80, that being the most I’ve ever paid for a commercial wine and not very often do I spend that much. $20-$50 is more typical for my wallet. Considering it costs me not even 1/10 of that $80 to make my own I’d say the cost value to me is up to say $70-ish but that is not factoring in equipment costs.
On the other hand, I am tickled pink to be able to make wine as good as some of my batches turn out. Some are really really good wines, not trying to brag here and I can’t say every single batch is like that and all so far are at least pleasant drinking, but it’s hard to put a value on those successes. Pride in a job well done can be priceless!
Are you making kits?
 
$11.37 per bottle ; ) But seriously, it doesn't matter how good my wine is, when I used to buy wine I averaged between $10-$11 per bottle and that's all I'm willing to spend so that's all my wine is worth. I grow my own grapes so I spend a lot of time working on them. I enjoy it, it is a stress reliever to come home and check out the vines, trim a branch here or there, sit down and just watch them grow ; ).

I bet I spend over 200 hours per year working on the vines and making wine (about 150 bottles last year), if I spent that time on my real job I'd be way ahead. So either it is worth $11.37 or costs me over $100 a bottle assuming I could get an additional 100+ hours of billable time.

I'd rather spend the time in garden then in the office.
You forgot the cost of the vineyard. the years until they produce...

Seriously, the time in the vineyard is priceless and much more enjoyable than any other job. Making wine is fun but not as much fun as the growing. Hard work but much more rewarding.
 
You forgot the cost of the vineyard. the years until they produce...

Seriously, the time in the vineyard is priceless and much more enjoyable than any other job. Making wine is fun but not as much fun as the growing. Hard work but much more rewarding.

I have an admiration for all growers. I'm sure it's rewarding in the end but getting to that point is way more than I am willing or able to take on.
 
Some of the wines I've made over the years have been brilliant, some have been not quite so good,
but I've enjoyed them all. As to what they were worth compared to commercial wines, who cares?
There are no other wines like them anywhere in the world. They were made and cared for by me. I enjoy making them, I enjoy drinking them even more. That's why I've been making wine for 60 years.

I think that if we worked out everything in terms of money, equipment, fruit, working hours, etc. we would all be shocked at what each bottle actually cost. $$$, £££. 😲

Enjoy your wine it's later than you think 😀
 
One thing to consider...when the supply chain breaks down, the ability to produce your own quality wine from grapes and wine grown on your own property not only gives you a sense of satisfaction and independence from the commercial stuff, it's also good for bartering for fruits and veggies from friends, family, and neighbors.
 
One thing to consider...when the supply chain breaks down, the ability to produce your own quality wine from grapes and wine grown on your own property not only gives you a sense of satisfaction and independence from the commercial stuff, it's also good for bartering for fruits and veggies from friends, family, and neighbors.
I've thought about the topics you mentioned in your post more than a few times.
 
As to what they were worth compared to commercial wines, who cares?
Until I started splitting batches with family members, I never seriously calculated the cost of my wines. Sure, $125 kit / 25 bottles = $5/bottle. But I didn't consider the cost of additives, oak, corks, capsules, & label. I make wine ... because I make wine. Folks on this forum probably understand that, while non-winemakers don't.

I have an acquaintance who purchased a Mustang for $42K USD, and over the following year spent another $35K on mods for it. I 'spose my feelings on winemaking help me understand his POV (which doesn't stop me from thinking he's nuts! :) )

At the same time, I understand attempts to place a value on our wine. Most folks want some measure of their success.
 
It is a hobby for most of us here I believe. I enjoy fishing and hunting too. But with all the money I've spent on equipment, clothing, trips, etc. It would be far far cheaper to just buy fish or venison. Something about doing it yourself and doing it well is, and I'll repeat myself, priceless!
I did attempt to break my first reply here into two values, a cost value and a satisfaction value. I could've been clearer.
 

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