Elderberry wine is bitter - too much tannin?

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thomas8861

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Any advice welcomed.

We make elderberry wine every year and our recipe book says save it for two years in the bottle to taste it at its best - well for the first time we have managed to keep some for nearly two years but am disappointed that it still tastes bitter - plenty of fruit flavour and reasonable alcohol content but not that polished smooth flavour that my Grandad managed!

Looking through these forums I suspect that too much tannin -a result of using too much fruit - a strong possibility in my case since it seems logical to take advantage of whats there when its there!

If this were the case is there a remedial action that can reduce the tannin level/ impact or an additive that could disguise it - or could anyone recommend a blend with other wine that they have tried and liked?
 

Larryh86GT

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Some more expert than I are going to have to help you. I like sweet wine so I would just sweeten it but I know that may not work for you. I added tannin for the first time in my last batch of raspberry wine and I don't know what it's done for the flavor yet.

I see you live not so far from away where the book Watership Downs took place. (Hampshire). It's something I read and enjoyed a long time ago.

Larry
 

non-grapenut

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Some more expert than I are going to have to help you. I like sweet wine so I would just sweeten it but I know that may not work for you. I added tannin for the first time in my last batch of raspberry wine and I don't know what it's done for the flavor yet.

I see you live not so far from away where the book Watership Downs took place. (Hampshire). It's something I read and enjoyed a long time ago.

Larry
Larry: The cartoon is so sad. Waaaah! Seems I go tharn all the time. and
Thomas: I heard from here that using finings like bentonite will grab the tannins out of a wine.
 
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non-grapenut

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And Thomas...adding bentonite as fining will grab some tannin. I learned that from this forum.
 

winemaker_3352

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Not sure what you can add to it or blend with it - but if it is tannin - let age longer.

The astringency from the tannins is what causes the dry and puckery feeling in the mouth following the consumption of unripened fruit or red wine

The destruction or modification of tannins with time plays an important role in the ripening of fruit and the aging of wine.
 

Julie

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Welcome Thomas,

Can you please post up your recipe and what the process that you did to make your wine? In all honesty, we can not tell you what to do until we see what you have done. Without this information any advice we give is nothing more than a shot in the dark.
 

thomas8861

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Thanks again

Thanks all - I'll try Bentonite and sweeten some and post the recipe when I get a chance.

Larry - Hampshire is the far South for us - and I can guaruntee that crossing roads down there without looking will definately result in flat pack bunnies!

Rgds
 

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