Cork issues

Discussion in 'Wine Making from Grapes' started by randomhero, Oct 3, 2015.

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  1. Oct 3, 2015 #1

    randomhero

    randomhero

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    This is from a 2013 Cabernet that I bottled around this time last year. Do you guys this this is too much of a seepage issue for a years worth of storage? It's a bi-disk cork which I know isn't great for super long term aging but a year seems kind of short.

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  2. Oct 4, 2015 #2

    sdelli

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    Yes.... Cheap cork but it should be ok.
     
  3. Oct 4, 2015 #3

    GreginND

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    I have some bidisc corks that have held up well for 10 years.
     
  4. Oct 4, 2015 #4

    Boatboy24

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    I wouldn't worry about that too much. Is it just this one bottle, or have you seen it on several? Did you keep the bottles upright for a day or two after corking? I've had this happen simply because I laid them down too early and the corks hadn't fully re-expanded.
     
  5. Oct 4, 2015 #5

    Floandgary

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    An often missed step in the process for sure. Pressing the cork (cork corks) into the bottle compresses the air in that little space. Left standing, the pressure will dissipate thru the cork. If you lay the bottle on it's side right away, that pressure will be trying to force wine thru the cork. It really is of no detriment since newer synthetic corks are impermeable. You might see an effect on an older/cheaper cork
     
  6. Oct 4, 2015 #6

    ibglowin

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    I use a bi-disc also called a 1+1 from Lafitte Cork. The 1+1 is a great design and the corks from Lafitte have held up very well now for four years for me. It depends on the quality of the cork first and foremost and then you also need a decent (floor) corker as well.
     
  7. Oct 4, 2015 #7

    randomhero

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    These were from morewine, I use a Portuguese floor corker so it's a decent one and always keep the bottles upright for a few days before I put them in the basement for aging.

    When I bottled the wine I had mostly regular grade 3 corks and some of the bi-disk also. The regular corks have held up fine but a few of the others are leaking by.
     

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