Apres Reisling Dessert Wine Kit

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Khristyjeff

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I'm about to start this Riesling Ice Wine kit and it was missing instructions so wondering if it might be missing anything else (like sugar packet for chaptalizing). It had the usual pack of bentonite, yeast, sorbet/sulphite and clearing agents, plus an F-Pack but nothing else.

Anyone have experience with this kit? Thanks for any guidance you can give.
 
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Maybe look on the internet for the instructions?
Thanks Bob. I found the instructions and printed off a copy for my notes but they are generic. They did answer my question about added sugar because they said that's only for the dessert wines and not Ice Wines. I know that sweet rieslings wouldn't have oak, so I just assumed I have everything except maybe labels which I tend not to use. Thanks for responding. I really appreciate it.
 
Add a quart of simple syrup to the primary, it will add Abv without affecting taste on this kit.
I’ve made this before and it f you wait one year it will be spot on🍾
 
German Ice wine can be as low as 6%, but usually around 9%. Canadian Ice wine comes between 9% -13% ABV. In both cases they have to reach a qualifying SG or Brix to be called Ice Wine. The grapes have to frozen on the vine before pressing and fermentation.
I've tasted German Eiswein years ago. Despite the intense sweetness, the high acidity stopped it from being cloying. The sort of wine that makes you think, "If only I could make wine like this"
Very nice but, I wouldn't buy it though. Not because I don't like it, or can't afford it, just because I'm a tight-fisted Yorkshire man. :mny:D
 
German Ice wine can be as low as 6%, but usually around 9%. Canadian Ice wine comes between 9% -13% ABV. In both cases they have to reach a qualifying SG or Brix to be called Ice Wine. The grapes have to frozen on the vine before pressing and fermentation.
I've tasted German Eiswein years ago. Despite the intense sweetness, the high acidity stopped it from being cloying. The sort of wine that makes you think, "If only I could make wine like this"
Very nice but, I wouldn't buy it though. Not because I don't like it, or can't afford it, just because I'm a tight-fisted Yorkshire man. :mny:D
Good to know. Thanks for the information.
 
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