1st Year Vine Training

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PittGrad

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Just planted a bunch of first year Marquette vines a few weeks ago, and upon planting had cut them back to 2 or 3 buds per each of the 2 canes. With bud break over the last couple of days, it looks like all of the buds (plus some) are viable.

I'm clear that the first year of growth is all about establishing strong root system and training upright. What I'm not clear on though is how long to let each bud and resulting leaves grow before selecting the strongest for training into the eventual trunk?

So looking for some help here--at what point do I select one and remove others? Should I even remove others this first year?

20170502_115215.jpg
 

salcoco

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you should have only one cane. rub off any buds below the two buds the ones you wish to keep on the one cane remaining. from your picture I would remove the cane on the left bottom and left of the "Y" remove the buds below. I would also add grow tubes to protect the vines in first year from weather and herbicide spray.
 

grapeman

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Since he is using two canes for growing I assume that his intention is to double trunk since this is Marquette. Double trunks are a common thing with cold hardy grapes and help insure that the vine will survive if one trunk succumbs to cold weather injury. I would let it all grow the first year and worry about selecting trunk material next year especially with Marquette. Cane diameter is fairly small for several years so it will benefit from staking. Just keep the growth tied to the stake. Next spring you can trim back.
 

Johny99

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I agree with grapeman if going for two trunks. I double trunk for the most part. Just let them go this year and next spring pick you two strongest and train them up. You may find a nice strong one down lower. I try for the split as low as I can.
 

PittGrad

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Thanks for the input. Wasn't intentionally going for 2 trunks but now I may based on your feedback. Being in the pittsburgh area (zone 6a), and these vines cold hardy to -20ish, is winter damage something I need to be too concerned about?

Related to the advice to just let them go this year, can I interpret that as just let whatever grows keep growing? I.e. don't rub/cut anything off and just let them get established?
 

Johny99

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Thanks for the input. Wasn't intentionally going for 2 trunks but now I may based on your feedback. Being in the pittsburgh area (zone 6a), and these vines cold hardy to -20ish, is winter damage something I need to be too concerned about?

Related to the advice to just let them go this year, can I interpret that as just let whatever grows keep growing? I.e. don't rub/cut anything off and just let them get established?
I don't know Marquette but, I
don't find a second trunk much of a bother once it hits the fruiting wire. For VSP, I train one each way. The advantage is if a trunk dies, you with luck still have one for some fruit.
Right on with the second part. id tie them up the steak but would leave at least 4 to choose from.
 

CTDrew

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Related to the advice to just let them go this year, can I interpret that as just let whatever grows keep growing? I.e. don't rub/cut anything off and just let them get established?
I would let it all grow. As grapeman said, just tie it all to the training stake. You can sort it out when you prune next spring. You want to build good roots this year for a healthy vine in the coming years.
 

dwhill40

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In life you have pruners and you have anti-pruners. If you grow grapevines successfully you must become a pruner. Think of it as all of the years growth goes back into the roots and will spring out the next season from the buds you leave after dormant pruning. The first year you want maximum growth of greenery so that next year at pruning time you leave the buds for a straight as possible trunk with a couple of buds to become your main shoot. I have left three or so buds and after seeing how they are shaping up I clean off unwanted shoots and leave one or two to dominate. For some it's not easy to brutalize what was a beautiful lush vine and just leave a wooden framework with a few dormant buds but you gotta embrace the prune. The photo is one months growth since bud break. Good luck!

IMG_20170429_193817329.jpg
 

mgmarty

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I agree with most people here. I really like choosing the best of the best in the spring, after you know what's been winter killed. And yes, more and more I'm going to a double trunk.
 

BlueStimulator

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Gotta agree we spend so much time and care the first few years. Then whack it all back to try and train the vines
 
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