Wild grape vines - a question.

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BernardSmith

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I want to try to grow some wild grapes. I assume that I have a better chance of successfully growing the grapes if I take some cuttings from the vines that grow near my home. My question: Is there a part of the vine that will more likely root than other parts? And is there a tried and tested method for rooting any cutting? Thanks.
 
I believe roots will grow from any part that is alive. Supposedly they’re supposed to more easily grow from the side of a cutting that is closer to the trunk, but I’ve heard the opposite as well. You can try dipping the cutting in rooting hormone, but again not sure it’s necessary. I’ve had some success just putting cuttings in a bucket of water until roots start growing, though I think I was more successful rooting them in moist potting soil. Sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn’t. Is there a reason you want to grow wild grapes rather than hybrids?
 
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Thank you for this information. Really helpful. I know wild grapes grow locally and where I live in upstate NY makes growing some varieties more problematic than those I don't like...
 
I've taken cuttings from vines and just jabbed them into the ground and they've taken, not all of them, but some, so they are pretty hardy in that respect. If you want to increase your odds jab them into individual pots with potting soil and water and you should get enough that take that you can transplant later. Cuttings should be a minimum thickness of a pencil to work in this manner.
 
I might also suggest cutting from 1 year (grew this year) dormant growth that has several buds, maybe 4-5. Are you wanting to use the grapes for wine or are they going to be ornamental? With all the hybrid varieties grown and developed in New York I’d probably want to go that route myself since they were developed with winemaking in mind but I’m sure it’s something you’ve already considered.
 
I've taken cuttings from vines and just jabbed them into the ground and they've taken, not all of them, but some, so they are pretty hardy in that respect. If you want to increase your odds jab them into individual pots with potting soil and water and you should get enough that take that you can transplant later. Cuttings should be a minimum thickness of a pencil to work in this manner.
Thank you. Much appreciated.
 
Thank you. Much appreciated.
I rooted all of my vines from cuttings. 120 or so. You want to take cuttings from the most current years growth. I take a cutting with 4 buds, the bottom cut is about an inch below the bottom bud and the top cut is 4 to 6 inch above the top bud and should be cut at a 45 deg. angle creating a point. I do that to indicate which side is up. Don't want to plant upside down. 2 buds get buried in soil and 2 above ground is for new growth.
I take my cuttings in Feb, March in Louisiana, just before budding out.
I have planted in pots and in ground. Both work, if planting in pots, don't transfer until you have good root growth. If planting in ground, water regularly, soil should stay damp.
This method has been 85 -95% successful for me. I have never used growth hormones.
If you get cuttings from a vinyard when they trim their vines, go ahead and plant as soon as possible, freshest cutting are the most successful.
Cuttings should be cut when vines are dormant.
Muscadines are completely different, they will not grow from cuttings.
 
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