What's for Dinner?

Wine Making Talk

Help Support Wine Making Talk:

mainshipfred

Junior Member
WMT Supporter
Joined
Feb 25, 2017
Messages
3,731
Reaction score
2,354
You only learn how to make good BBQ by making bad BBQ. Probably needed to be cooked another hour or so until the probe or fork goes in and it feels like melted butter. 203F is another suggested temp but temps are just guidelines. Its done when its done. Also you really need to rest the meat for at least an hour after pulling. Can't stress this enough.
Thanks for all your tips. Even though it didn't turn out as well as I would have liked it was fun doing it even though it's an all day commitment.
 

Kraffty

Member
Joined
Aug 8, 2012
Messages
1,722
Reaction score
2,708
Location
Northern Arizona
@mainshipfred - One down just another 2 or 3 and you'll hit that "ahhhh Haaaaa" that's IT! moment. All this brisket talk and out of no where my wife asked yesterday when are you going to do another brisket? Time to start lining up a BBQ get together! Mike
 

geek

Still lost.....
Joined
Sep 25, 2012
Messages
6,237
Reaction score
2,888
Location
CT
I'm glad I split the brisket. I used the flat portion about 4 lbs and smoked for about 6 hours. Took over an hour before I could regulate the temperature before putting on the meat. for the most part it stayed around 240 - 260 degrees with a few spikes and lows and had some terrible white smoke issues at times. I used hickory logs about 6" long and cooked it to 180 degrees. Bottom line it was tough but tasty with a spicy rub I found online.
Based on what I read it seems folks recommend turning the meat so the flat or the point are not always facing the fire, the flat may burn and dry out if always facing the fire, plus internal temp is key, 200~205F is around the range.
 

Kraffty

Member
Joined
Aug 8, 2012
Messages
1,722
Reaction score
2,708
Location
Northern Arizona
my wife mentioned Fried Chicken sounding really good and I realized for all my years of cooking that I had never attempted deep frying chicken. I Did the buttermilk/siracha brine all day then dredged, dried and then fried between 300 and 325 for about 12 minutes then threw them in the oven at 350 till they reached the 160 mark. Really came out good, served up with some mac and cheese and tomatoes.
friedChicken.jpg FriedChickenPlate.jpg
 

Boatboy24

No longer a newbie, but still clueless.
Joined
Mar 18, 2012
Messages
13,398
Reaction score
9,273
Location
DC Suburbs
my wife mentioned Fried Chicken sounding really good and I realized for all my years of cooking that I had never attempted deep frying chicken. I Did the buttermilk/siracha brine all day then dredged, dried and then fried between 300 and 325 for about 12 minutes then threw them in the oven at 350 till they reached the 160 mark. Really came out good, served up with some mac and cheese and tomatoes.
Dang, Mike! That looks heavenly!
 

Johnd

Sanitized Member
WMT Supporter
Joined
Jun 10, 2015
Messages
6,276
Reaction score
6,041
Location
South Louisiana
Awesome looking chicken!! Give this a try next time to see if you like it:

Sous vide chicken for 2 - 3 hours at 142 F, remove from bag, prep and fry as normal, just pull it when the batter browns, since the chicken is already cooked. HUGE time saver, and you won’t ever burn your oil since it’s ready so fast. Juiciest, most tender fried chicken you’ll ever make,
 

ceeaton

Fifth year
Joined
Feb 15, 2015
Messages
4,886
Reaction score
4,761
Location
Southern PA
Thanks for all your tips. Even though it didn't turn out as well as I would have liked it was fun doing it even though it's an all day commitment.
Another thing you could try is to wrap the brisket in butchers paper after 5 or 6 hours in the grill. It will help maintain some moisture and protect it from the heat source, to a point. Then you can finish it off in hopefully another 3 or 4 hours and it's dinner time! Oh, and a 15 pack of icy cold beer helps pass time while you are watching over your stick burner.

On a side note, my younger brother is heavily into the sous vide thing, he packaged a smaller piece of brisket in the 5 or 6 lb range (looked like the flat to me, with a little point (grain change gave that away)), did it to 155*F for I believe 18-24 hours, cooled it overnight, finished it off on the weber kettle with some charcoal and hickory wood for a few hours, I think. I was skeptical, but when I put a fork in it to transfer it to the plate to rest, it was like butter. The probe averaged around 195*F before the rest, never took the temp just before serving, but it was really tender and tasty! It was also his first try at cooking some brisket.
 

ceeaton

Fifth year
Joined
Feb 15, 2015
Messages
4,886
Reaction score
4,761
Location
Southern PA
Almost forgot, will be doing some requested (and some not requested) dinners while my son is hanging around. I have a filet roast, boneless turkey breast, ribs and a pork shoulder to make some pulled pork. Hoping prices come down on beef ribs (they usually turn out really well). I know he wants a brisket too, but that may wait until we get home from our cabin (no large stick burner up there and I like using the New Braunfels offset smoker for brisket).
 

ibglowin

Moderator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Jul 7, 2009
Messages
21,502
Reaction score
12,130
Location
Northern Nuevo Mexico
Ha! You know today I saw a hot dog taste off and the highest ranked dog was the (93 point) Costco All Beef Dog. Might have to try a pack. Have had a few at the store but am sure they would be better grilled LOL
 

sour_grapes

Victim of the Invasion of the Avatar Snatchers
Joined
Sep 19, 2013
Messages
10,755
Reaction score
8,443
Location
near Milwaukee
Weather was funny here today, which wound up affecting my dinner. It was coldish and sucky and overcast/sprinkling this morning. Felt like winter hanging on. I went to the store, and found a nice hunk of chuck roast, and decided to make boeuf bourguignon. However, later in the day, weather conditions improved, and it actually turned out kinda nice. I could have grilled if my decision hadn't been made earlier.

So, how do you pull off a marriage of a hibernal and a vernal meal? (I am hoping @ceeaton is still reading!) I decided to pair the wintry stew (served over pasta), with a spring-like side dish, viz., sauteed garlic ramps. I usually broil ramps, but the bulbs on these were too large. I opted to slice 'em all up, sautee the bulbs, then wilt the leaves, with plenty of EVOO and some salt. Turned out really nice!

DSCN2985.jpg
 

Johnd

Sanitized Member
WMT Supporter
Joined
Jun 10, 2015
Messages
6,276
Reaction score
6,041
Location
South Louisiana
Weather was funny here today, which wound up affecting my dinner. It was coldish and sucky and overcast/sprinkling this morning. Felt like winter hanging on. I went to the store, and found a nice hunk of chuck roast, and decided to make boeuf bourguignon. However, later in the day, weather conditions improved, and it actually turned out kinda nice. I could have grilled if my decision hadn't been made earlier.

So, how do you pull off a marriage of a hibernal and a vernal meal? (I am hoping @ceeaton is still reading!) I decided to pair the wintry stew (served over pasta), with a spring-like side dish, viz., sauteed garlic ramps. I usually broil ramps, but the bulbs on these were too large. I opted to slice 'em all up, sautee the bulbs, then wilt the leaves, with plenty of EVOO and some salt. Turned out really nice!

View attachment 54835
Followed, of course, by garlic induced flatulence......
 

geek

Still lost.....
Joined
Sep 25, 2012
Messages
6,237
Reaction score
2,888
Location
CT
Not a dinner pic but this weekend looks like a good Friday/Saturday combo for a first time try on a brisket, although I have so many house chores to do..
But starting a brisket Friday night and finish it off Saturday afternoon sounds like a good plan [emoji4]

IMG_0362.JPG
 
2
Top