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What happens if you add too much fruit when making wine?

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Hi
I'm making some blackberry wine and I've added nearly 9 pounds of blackberries to 1 gallon of water with 2.5 pounds of sugar. I wanted full bodied wine but is this too much fruit as many recipes suggest around 4 pounds but rarely more than 7 pounds.

Has anyone done this before?
 

Julie

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Check your acid levels. I don't thing 9 pounds is too much. Actually my preference would be no water.
 

BernardSmith

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Julie beat me to the punch!
I guess I'm a contrarian. I don't really understand the preference those writers of recipes have for fermenting water. Water ought to be the substance we use to help clean and sanitize our equipment, not something we use to dilute fruit juice. would you dilute pressed juice with water if you weren't fermenting the juice? Why dilute the flavors simply because you are now adding yeast? Fruit is full of water. If the author of the recipe cannot extract enough liquid from the fruit they have they should either reduce the volume of the wine they are making ... or increase the amount of fruit, but diluting the flavor by drowning it in water as if fruit is the same as malted grain and they are brewing beer does not seem to me to be a good approach.
All that said, I am not sure that you have added "too much fruit". I suspect that the 9 lbs of berries would produce close to a gallon of juice, so you may have two gallons of wine. What you might do if that indeed is what you have (or will produce) is to freeze the juice and collect it as it thaws to collect one gallon. What will remain frozen will be the water and what will have thawed will be much of the sugars and the flavor.
And if the acid levels seem to high (the pH too low) it may be better to add K-carbonate than to add water...
 
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Arne

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You should get your hydrometer out and check the specific gravity. Don't know how much sugar the blackberries contain, but think you might be getting the s.g. a bit too high. Should be keeping it about 1.085 to 1.100. Get it much higher than that and you can wind up with a very sweet wine with high alcohol, or might run into trouble trying to get it to ferment. Arne.
 
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