Ty's Cafe Latte mead recipe

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Ty520

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Wanted to share my latest creation...

Ty's Cafe Latte mead:

INGREDIENTS:

(1 gallon batch)


-48 ounces orange blossom honey
-16 ounces lactose
-71b yeast
-20 ounces coarse-grind, mild-roasted coffee
-1 vanilla bean
2 ounces cocoa nibs

METHOD:

-rehydrate yeast per instructions
-add honey and lactose to primary vessel and top to 1 gallon/ 1125 OG; pitch yeast
-feed nutrients per TOSNA protocol
-upon completion of fermentation, add coffee and nibs in nylon brew bag; remove after 24 hours
-rack mead
-add vanilla; rack again after 2 months
-rack as necessary until clarity achieved

Best if aged for 2 years to properly break down the fatty acids present in coffee and cocoa nibs
 
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Ty520

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it gives it a silky creaminess, but also sweetness in that quantity. There's been lots at attempts and discussions at mimicking 'creaminess,' including attempts and using actual dairy in mead (using whey and such) but for me, lactose has been the only successful method of instilling anything resembling those qualities
 
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VinesnBines

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Is that 48 ounces weight of honey or liquid measurement (one quart and one pint)? My quarts weigh more than 32 ounces.
 

Ty520

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It does impart the sensation of something that was made with cream or milk...but not explicitly "of" cream or milk, if that makes sense?

all measurements are by weight

If you look up old threads on lactose on various forums, you'll see lots of people dismissing its use, but you'll also find that almost all of them used such scant amounts that it was pointless. It takes an entire pound of lactose to impart just 20 points of gravity in just 1 gallon. some of these people were using a couple ounces and wondering why they couldn't detect any difference.

I only use it when i am trying to emulate something that typically has a creamy quality.

I will warn you that it is a pain to full incorporate (and probably won't completely incorporate - i had WAY more sediment than normal). this is why i prefer adding it up front in the first step - gives it maximal time to incorporate, with the added benefit of allowing you the vigorous daily stirrings during the first week of degassing/nutrient additions that you shouldn't do if you were to add it in secondary as a backsweetener.
 
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Ty520

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That makes total sense. I'm going to add this to my list of things to try.
Also, fyi, I recently learned that some coffee farmers in Latin America sell coffee blossom honey, which I never knew existed,and hope to try on the next round.
 

VinesnBines

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This sounds like a plan. I have a couple pounds of lactose taking up space in my beer/wine ingredient cabinet.
 

Jim Welch

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Wanted to share my latest creation...

Ty's Cafe Latte mead:

INGREDIENTS:

(1 gallon batch)


-48 ounces orange blossom honey
-16 ounces lactose
-71b yeast
-20 ounces coarse-grind, mild-roasted coffee
-1 vanilla bean
2 ounces cocoa nibs

METHOD:

-rehydrate yeast per instructions
-add honey and lactose to primary vessel and top to 1 gallon/ 1125 OG; pitch yeast
-feed nutrients per TOSNA protocol
-upon completion of fermentation, add coffee and nibs in nylon brew bag; remove after 24 hours
-rack mead
-add vanilla; rack again after 2 months
-rack as necessary until clarity achieved

Best if aged for 2 years to properly break down the fatty acids present in coffee and cocoa nibs
I was thinking of making a mead and stumbled upon this recipe. It sounds good!
Have you tasted this when racking and if so do you feel that was an appropriate amount of lactose to use? I know it needs much more aging as you mention but was wondering hypothetically speaking, if you made it again if you feel you'd use the same amount at this point in time? Thank you
 

Ty520

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I was thinking of making a mead and stumbled upon this recipe. It sounds good!
Have you tasted this when racking and if so do you feel that was an appropriate amount of lactose to use? I know it needs much more aging as you mention but was wondering hypothetically speaking, if you made it again if you feel you'd use the same amount at this point in time? Thank you
Yes and no, LOL.

because of the way I added it, a lot of it got lost in the lees during racking, so I never not the maximum potential gravity out of it. Still pleasant, but much less sweet than I thought it would be.

Whenever I use lactose now, I simmer it in the must water first to maximize dissolution - even then, there's loss.

Also worth noting is that lactose is only about 25% of the sweetness of sucrose, so even though it seems like a lot, it's contribution is subtle
 

Jim Welch

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Yes, I’ve used it in beer and it is difficult to dissolve in less than warm or hot water. And that amount (1 Lb in about 3 quarts of water) starts to approach the maximum solubility of lactose in water, if I calculated properly.
I may back off just a bit on the lactose then. Thanks for the info.
 

Ty520

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Yes, I’ve used it in beer and it is difficult to dissolve in less than warm or hot water. And that amount (1 Lb in about 3 quarts of water) starts to approach the maximum solubility of lactose in water, if I calculated properly.
I may back off just a bit on the lactose then. Thanks for the info.
I find that - unless all you're looking for is a touch of extra body and the slightest hint of residual sweetness - anything less than 8 ounces becomes imperceptible (as lactose), especially after accounting for losses from racking
 

Jim Welch

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I find that - unless all you're looking for is a touch of extra body and the slightest hint of residual sweetness - anything less than 8 ounces becomes imperceptible (as lactose), especially after accounting for losses from racking
OK, thanks for that, I was thinking of using 12-14 oz per gallon. Going to aim to get 5 gallons of finished Mead so maybe a 5 1/2- 6 gallon batch to start. And I found coffee blossom honey that I plan to use too!
 

Ty520

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OK, thanks for that, I was thinking of using 12-14 oz per gallon. Going to aim to get 5 gallons of finished Mead so maybe a 5 1/2- 6 gallon batch to start. And I found coffee blossom honey that I plan to use too!
also, don't skip the vanilla - really helps to smooth and round it out; also, I highly advise going with a light roast with floral, fruity notes, as opposed to a darker roast, which can result in astringent characteristics, and usually has more savory aromas and flavors that clash.

If you have a good local roaster, I recommend asking them to help make a good selection - don't dismiss their knowledge and willingness to help
 

Jim Welch

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I’ll look into the local roaster and definitely going to use vanilla beans, extract grade Madagascar beans. You say a light roast is best, like a blonde or more towards medium roast?
I think I’m going to use Syrah yeast strain since I have some and it is a glycerin (or glycerol) creating strain (or so many be read) and might help contribute to mouth feel.
also, don't skip the vanilla - really helps to smooth and round it out; also, I highly advise going with a light roast with floral, fruity notes, as opposed to a darker roast, which can result in astringent characteristics, and usually has more savory aromas and flavors that clash.

If you have a good local roaster, I recommend asking them to help make a good selection - don't dismiss their knowledge and willingness to help
I’ll look into the local roaster and definitely going to use vanilla beans, extract grade Madagascar beans. You say a light roast is best, like a blonde or more towards medium roast?
I think I’m going to use Syrah yeast strain since I have some and it is a glycerin (or glycerol) creating strain (or so I’ve read) and might help contribute to mouth feel.
 

Ty520

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Closer to blonde roast . It isn't just roast, but origin will be highly important as well. work with your local provider to find a complimentary pairing.
 

Ty520

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I think those work well, but I would avoid anything with herbal notes which can often fall into that realm

Also anything in the nutty, caramel or chocolate profile works nicely
 
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