Two More Kits On The Go

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vinny

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Aging is important, but perception sells the higher priced kits. This is not being cynical -- I think it's great marketing!


Ok, I am taking this to mean that the concentrate allows for more flavor control on the kit makers end, and the real juice content of premium kits, same as with my berry wines or real juice buckets, will take more time to turn from a fermented juice to a wine with fully developed flavors?
 

vinny

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Edit: You could, you know, umm, taste it to find out!

The reserves kit was thick, yellowish. It was like syrup but not that sweet. It had a definite caramel flavor, possibly some vanilla, but mostly a lightly converted sugar without the sweetness of a thick syrup.

So yes, this proves you can taste it!
 
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Ok, I am taking this to mean that the concentrate allows for more flavor control on the kit makers end, and the real juice content of premium kits, same as with my berry wines or real juice buckets, will take more time to turn from a fermented juice to a wine with fully developed flavors?
It's more that concentrate is cheaper, so the lower end kits use more concentrate. Keep in mind there are varying qualities of concentrate, so not all are equal in that regard.

OTOH, FWK messes with this model, since AFAIK, the kits are all concentrate.

Also keep in mind that FWK is a small company, so overhead can be a lot lower. Large companies such as WE and RJS have more corporate overhead, hence a need for a higher profit margin, which affects everything.
 

joeswine

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Based on the colour and thickness I assumed it was just a syrup. Are the reserve packs more of a flavor pack than a sweetener, or is this more of an in case they have flavor enhancers included?
Sweetner
 

szap

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I racked both kits yesterday. I decided to follow the instructions other than just using K-meta for the Merlot instead of the included sorbate pack.

I'm like a dog chasing cars with this hobby. Every time I turn around there's another post and I think that sounds so interesting, I have to try it. I instantly wonder if I can do that to something I have already started. Instead of changing the process of something I have on the go I have decided to add a little focus to the game and finish a batch as it was intended from the start, then move on to the next one with a different intent.

I added more water to primary this time and got full carboys with a cup or so extra of each once finings were added.

The Merlot is Acidic. It smell nice. Fairly deep and oaky, but it needs some time to mellow. Not a surprise right out of primary.

The Diablo Rojo, however, is already shaping up to be something really enjoyable. It's honestly shocking how a week ago it was just sweet grape juice and it is currently showing the characteristics of a really good wine.

Is there more to these kits than just juice and that is how they mark the aging time, 4,6,8 weeks etc? Both of these four week kits are just so much different than the premium kits. Given the flavours of the premium kits at racking I was thinking they could take a LONG time to become drinkable. The Pinot Grigio had no exciting fruit notes, or tart follow through flavors. With both 4 week kits I can see how just a little rounding will make them very drinkable. The Merlot just needs to blend enough that the acid isn't the prominent flavor, and the Diablo Rojo really just needs to soften and blend a little. The flavors are already there and it is fairly balanced.

Is it modifications to the juice? Is it because the flavors of the end product are so different. The premium kits will develop such broader flavor profiles they show less promise early, and the 4 weeks kits create a simpler more balanced flavor profile earlier?

I am just trying to understand the process and how I can relate it to other wines I will make in the future. As well as how it will translate to country wines and others made from raw ingredients instead of juice.
I can't add anything to additions and methods of backsweeting, etc but I can say, probably because most of our friends don't care for really dry wine, the Diablo Rojo has been hugely popular.
 

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