Question regarding go ferm evolution

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Tripled92

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Hey everyone,

So lately we have been using fermaid O in our wine making process. Was reading through a couple of websites and found out about go ferm evolution. Should we use this with fermaid O. If yes, have you noticed any benefits?
 
I use it but not “with” Fermaid O. It is a yeast rehydration concoction that, according to the maker, helps yeast during rehydration. I believe you’ll find many here use it.
It is not necessary per se for hydration but, again according to the maker, especially helps in must over 24 Brix which is the case with all my wines as I pretty much only make big dry red wines.
I do use Fermaid O as a yeast nutrient in my wines but not until after fermentation has started.
 
Hey everyone,

So lately we have been using fermaid O in our wine making process. Was reading through a couple of websites and found out about go ferm evolution. Should we use this with fermaid O. If yes, have you noticed any benefits?
I use Go Ferm to make my starters and Fermaid O for the fermenting bucket. I find hydrating is always best to eliminate the clumping in a large vessel. Using a whisk or stir plate gets the job done.
 
I find hydrating is always best to eliminate the clumping in a large vessel. Using a whisk or stir plate gets the job done.
Many winemakers recommend against stirring the starter into the must, saying keeping the yeast together results in a better population
 
Many winemakers recommend against stirring the starter into the must, saying keeping the yeast together results in a better population
I got that from the FWK instructions. While I cannot guarantee that it's a major reason for rapid ignition of fermentation since I started doing it, the method works great so I don't see any reason to change it.
 
Many winemakers recommend against stirring the starter into the must, saying keeping the yeast together results in a better population
Yes you are correct. 1 cup water between 90-100F in a sanitized jar. Whisk in GoFerm until dissolved. Then whisk in yeast and leave it alone for 3-12 hours lightly covered with sanitized foil or a loose cover. Pour the starter against the side of the fermenter so the population stays together. You can swirl the jar after pouring some into the fermenter not to lose any yeast. Do not stir the must for around 24 -36 hours. At that time you should see some nice fermentation. Thats what winemakers mean by not stirring a starter into the must.
 
Yes you are correct. 1 cup water between 90-100F in a sanitized jar. Whisk in GoFerm until dissolved. Then whisk in yeast and leave it alone for 3-12 hours lightly covered with sanitized foil or a loose cover.
3 hours (not to mention 12 hours) is asking a lot of Go-Ferm without adding any additional must/nutrient. From Scott Labs' yeast rehydration protocol:

Do not let yeast stand in rehydration water longer than 30 minutes without adding juice/must or populations will decline


I've always used some variant of the Scott Labs protocol and had good luck with it...
 
3 hours (not to mention 12 hours) is asking a lot of Go-Ferm without adding any additional must/nutrient. From Scott Labs' yeast rehydration protocol:

Do not let yeast stand in rehydration water longer than 30 minutes without adding juice/must or populations will decline

I've always used some variant of the Scott Labs protocol and had good luck with it...
Oops. Thanks for catching that. Also add 3 Tbls sugar to the starter. Have also used must as indicated in your link.
 
It’s a good hydration nutrient I use it commercially and pitch Nutristart by laffort 2 times during primary to ensure that my yeast has what it needs to succeed in a fermentation
 

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