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Please critique my Orange wine recipe

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arcticsid

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I took the plunge and started my first ever batch using fruit instead of concentrated juice.

This recipe is based roughly on one I found on Jack Kellers site.

In the cuisinart, I liquified 32, peeled Seedless Naval Oranges and poured it into a sterilized 5 gallon bucket.

To this I added (2) 11.5 oz..containers of Welch's White grape Juice. On top of this I poured over the top, 1 gallon of boiling water and allowed it to sit for about 30 mins.

I dissolved 6# of sugar in 1 1/2 gallons ov warm water and added this to the must.

A added 1 TBLS of yeast energizer and 1 tsp of Sodium-meta that I dissolved in a bout a cup of water.

I then realized I had 3 cups of frozen low-bush cranberries in the freezer from last summer. I gave them the cuisinart treatment and stirred it all together pretty aggressively and allowed it to sit for about 12 hours.

Starting SG, 1.090 @ 80 degrees.

I just pitched 1 sachet of Red Star Premier Cuvee that I rehydrated according to the package instructions.

Time will now tell. I thought it was a little "pulpy", but the original recipe didn't indicate that would be a problem and suggested straining it through a cheesecloth on the way to the secondary and then of course squeezing that to remove as much juice as possible.

So, thats what I did. Any input or critique would be appreciated.

As Always, Thank You

Troy
:)
 

peagen

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Sounds like your on your way. Keep us posted.
 

Wade E

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I dont see any pectic enzyme in there!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I use 1/2 tsp of energixer per gallon and 1 tsp of nutrient per gallon myself.
 

arcticsid

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Tell me how much to add!
Wade, I appreciate your help, and I need it. Please advise
Troy
 

Wade E

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Itdepnds on which 1 you have, go by the manufacturers instructions and you could add a little extra. there is liquid concentrate and powder and both are fine. If yu het the liquid, store it in the fridge.
 

arcticsid

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Wade, I have no instructions, this isn't a kit, it's a true Northern Pollack wine. I'll refer back to the original recipe, but I am certain it doesn't mention the enzyme, I do recall, however, it did mention tannin.
Thanks Again
Troy
 

Luc

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Pectic enzymes are not critical in the needed dose.

If you use a bit less it will take then longer to do the job, if you use more it does not impart off-flavors.

On a batch like this with I presume some pulp I would use 2 to 3 teaspoons of powdered enzymes.

And please store the remaining powered enzymes also in the fridge.
That way they will last longer.

Look for my info on pectic enzymes here:

http://wijnmaker.blogspot.com/2008/01/avonturen-op-het-pecto-pad-deel-2.html

Luc
 

arcticsid

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The Pemier yeast took off like a rocket! Just gave it a look/see. I have a rather thick cap of pupl on top, resembles cornbread!:) Tried to push it down, but it didn't seem to want to go down. Should I just leave it as it is until ready to transfer or should I continue to attemp pushing it down everyday? Other than that its looking good, I may be on to something here. I'm a little proud of myself, making fruit wine for the first time is like taking the training wheels off:D:D
Troy
 

Wade E

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You should have pectic enzyme and I was reffering to the instructions on the pectic enzyme package, not instructions on a sheet from a kit as I knew it wasnt. You should punch down the cap f here is fruit or pulb floating to the top at least once a day so it doesnt dry out and go bad and to help extarct color and flavor better. If you dont use pectic enzyme you could end up with a haze that will be very hard to get rid of later and you may not get as much color or flavor as you wanted.
 

Luc

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The cap is still full of color, sugar, flavor and other goodies.
Therefore you should push it down two to three times a day.
It then soaks and the goodies leech out.

Normally I do it in the morning, when I come home at 6 and before I go to bed at midnight.

Another point is that if you do not push the cap down there
might bacteria growing on top.
By pushing it down it will mingle, keep moist and the sulphite and forming alcohol keeps it 'sterile'.

So keep pushing the cap down at least two times a day.

Luc
 

arcticsid

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Thanks for the response LUC. While were on this subject, one of the first things I learned from all of you was the importance of sterilization, and I will continue to practice good sterilization. But out of curiosity, if the sulphite and forming alcohol keeps the cap sterile, than why is it so important to sterilize my draw tube each time I remove a sample or for that mater the intrument I use to push the cap down. I didn't say not clean, I say sterilize?
Troy
 

Manimal

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Sterilization is a bit of a misnomer in terms of winemaking. Sterilization implies the complete eradication of all yeasts and microorganisms present, which is impossible in winemaking. Sanitation is the term usually used in the industry and which refers to the practice of keeping the populations of wild yeasts and bacteria in check through regular and thorough cleaning of the equipment and environment. When you rinse your equipment with sulfite, you're not really sterilizing it, but just sanitizing it. By doing so, you prevent nasties from building up on it and in the environment and possibly contaminating your must if the population builds up to problematic levels.
 

Wade E

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If much bacteria or just 1 very strong bacteria is introduced then it can overtake the sterilizing manner of the alc and sulfites in the wine and ruin it. By keeping all you can out of your wine you run much less of a risk of this.
 

arcticsid

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I understand that and will always be careful and clean. I am extremely excited about this orange wine and would be devestaed to see it get bad. My first few batches were made from frozen concentrate, and it worked, but it was just for learning. This is my first "born".

I pitched the yeast on Friday(6th) at 3 pm, today I measured the SG @ 12pm I had 1.035, I started with 1.090. I used Red Star Premier Cuvee, it took off like a rocket, didn't even make a starter, just rehydrated it.

So far I'm tickled but realize I have a ways to go. Actually, I'm quite surprised, it has a decent flavor, and can only anticipate (unqualified of course) how good it will be in a few more months.

Will keep you posted. P.S. took Lucs advice and am trying to push my cap down at least a couple times a day. Lifting the lid(which is loosely)gives enough wiff to know it is fermenting great. Hey, who needs wine, just ferment a bunch of oranges and breath deep while squashing down the must?
Troy
 

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