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% of insect tannins

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pgentile

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What is the % of insect tannins in the average grape batch? Didn't notice these earwigs in SA grapes until after looking at photos. we inspected the grapes pretty good and didn't see these nor notice during crush.

I've seen insects in almost every grape batch I have done from California, Chile and now SA. Grasshoppers to caterpillars and other stuff. My bet there is more than we realize.

So I'm just going to pretend they are natural tannin additions.
 

Ajmassa

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Which are paint chips and which are insects? Those big suckers? Maybe I haven’t inspected close enough- but I haven’t seen any bugs other han fruit flies.
 

crooked cork

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Asian beetles are a big problem here in minnesota. i spray weekly. We have made wine with beetles in and with out. obviously much better with out. turned out bitter and brown with and light purple and yummy with out.
Took some Blue Bell wine to Easter dinner today was a big hit,
 

balatonwine

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What is the % of insect tannins in the average grape batch?
It is not uncommon for insects, insect parts and "guts" to occur in food. And it is so routine, that the amount of insect parts (and other things you may not want to know are in your food and beverages) actually allowed at each stage (i.e. at harvest, during processing, and for consumer consumption) is in the The FDA Defect Levels Handbook.

Rather than read that entire document, and for a shorter list, see the Wikipedia page on allowed food defects.

But for the most part, for wine making, things like earwigs will mostly pass through a crusher unscathed. And unless you are doing a really hard pressing, probably won't "pop" open during pressing. Spiders are more delicate. And ladybugs are a real problem. They release chemical compounds when disturbed (such as when touched), and that can lead to "ladybug taint" in wine.
 
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pgentile

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It is not uncommon for insects, insect parts and "guts" to occur in food. And it is so routine, that the amount of insect parts (and other things you may not want to know are in your food and beverages) actually allowed at each stage (i.e. at harvest, during processing, and for consumer consumption) is in the The FDA Defect Levels Handbook.

Rather than read that entire document, and for a shorter list, see the Wikipedia page on allowed food defects.

But for the most part, for wine making, things like earwigs will mostly pass through a crusher unscathed. And unless you are doing a really hard pressing, probably won't "pop" open during pressing. Spiders are more delicate. And ladybugs are a real problem. They release chemical compounds when disturbed (such as when touched), and that can lead to "ladybug taint" in wine.
Several careers ago when I was a bread baker, we would take rye flour add water and let sit to make a sour, in the middle of the winter fruit flies would appear once the sour got to a certain temp. So there had to be fruit fly eggs or larvae in the flour. Yes it has always been my understanding that FDA allows a certain percentage of insects in food.

Luckily I haven't seen lady bugs in or on a grapes to this point.

Will check out your links.
 

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