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Nanny Berry similar to Elderberry

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Half Life

Junior
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I just learned about Elderberry this summer from land owner next to me as he has them going on his place

Well I thought they were the same plants going on my place but he said no mine were not Elderberry but looked similar so again off to library to solve this puzzle

It turns out the plants growing on my place are called Nanny Berry , kind of a dip stick name but I have about 3 acres scattered with them and don't want to eliminate them if they are any good to make wine with

The other year I cut out a 600 ft path thru this stuff about 12 ft wide for property access and a fire lane as I live in a forest area , was just wondering if anyone ever used these for wine making or canning as a preserve
 

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Junior
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I Googled Nanny Berry Wine. Found a recipe. Sounds interesting
You might have something there.

Beano Joe
I ate some last summer an they seemed OK but was not into making wine at that time so this year we will give a try , a very small berry so will have to pick quite a lot and get them before the birds do but we will certainly try something with them

Half life
 

ThreeSheetsToTheWind

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I've eaten them, and I have lots on my property too. They taste like a cross between a prune and a banana to me, and they are mostly seed. I've never made wine from them, would be cool to try. Maybe if I have time next fall...
 

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Junior
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I've eaten them, and I have lots on my property too. They taste like a cross between a prune and a banana to me, and they are mostly seed. I've never made wine from them, would be cool to try. Maybe if I have time next fall...
Yes when they establish them self they sure spread over quite and area , they are a good hedgerow cover and sure do get thick

I have been checking web sites for information about this plant as it seems like it quite a wonder of nature but for wine making I think rather limited because they are so small and yes they seems to be be mostly seed

We will give a try though and utilize what natures gives us on our land , looking forward to next fall and another special project
 

Scooter68

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North Dakota State University source identifies the Nannyberry:

Uses

Conservation/Windbreaks
Medium to large shrub for farmstead windbreaks, and
riparian plantings.
Wildlife -Food for wildlife, good cover.

Products - Cut or dried flowers.

Food
Fruit used fresh, processed and dried.
Native Americans ate it raw.
White settlers used the bark for tea.

Medicinal - Used as diuretic, nerve sedative, for asthma
and hayfever, and treatment of cramps and palpitation.

Urban/Recreational

Good for naturalizing and borders, attractive reddish fall
colors are common.

Cultivated Varieties
None.

Related Species

American Cranberry bush (Viburnum trilobum)
Arrowwood Viburnum (V. dentatum)
European Cranberry bush (V. opulus)
Wayfaring Tree Viburnum (V. lantana)
 

Half Life

Junior
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Yes it makes good windbreak and row cover, just have to manage them as they seem invasive

To bad no mention of wine , we will see later this year with that though
 

Stressbaby

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I have made wine with two different viburnums we grow. V. trilobum (cranberry bush viburnum) was undrinkably bitter. V prunifolium (blackhaw viburnum) was used in a coferment with blackberry, serviceberry, haskaps, and elderberry; I know drinkable wine is made from the other components, so I have to conclude this test batch was ruined by the blackhaws. Nannyberries sound quite similar to blackhaws, in terms of very little pulp, all seed and skin. I would not have high hopes for wine from nannyberries.
 

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Junior
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I have made wine with two different viburnums we grow. V. trilobum (cranberry bush viburnum) was undrinkably bitter. V prunifolium (blackhaw viburnum) was used in a coferment with blackberry, serviceberry, haskaps, and elderberry; I know drinkable wine is made from the other components, so I have to conclude this test batch was ruined by the blackhaws. Nannyberries sound quite similar to blackhaws, in terms of very little pulp, all seed and skin. I would not have high hopes for wine from nannyberries.
That is probably best information on these yet , yes they are not much plus the time and energy involved to harvest these just may not be worth the effort in the first place.........it is something I have been pondering but romantic notions of things sometimes cloud the facts

Thanks for sharing your experience
 

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