RJ Spagnols My Cabernet still has gas. Ugh

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spleisher

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So I recently bottled a RJ Spagnols Cellar Classic Cabernet. Cleared really nice, and I actually bulk aged a bit past the "bottling time" on the instructions. I probably bottled it 6 weeks or so after it was technically "scheduled" to be bottled.

I didn't notice gas on the samples I took, but I just opened a bottle (it's only been int he bottle a month, but my curiosity got the better of me).

Anyway, I'll be darned if there isn't some CO2 in it. It's not totally fizzy, but it's there, and if I give the bottle a swirl with my thumb over it, I get a little pop when I remove my thumb.

It seems to go away (more or less) after hanging out in a glass for a bit.

So, my question is this... Will this possibly dissipate/calm down after a few more months of aging? Is decanting an option to make it go away if not?

The thing is, I degassed it pretty heavily, and it's definitely fermented dry, so I am not sure why this little bit of gas is there.

I'm hesitant to uncork and dump all the bottles back into a carboy, but I'll do it if I have to.

Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated!
 

xanxer82

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Decanting helps. Maybe opening the bottle up and using the mitivac or something similar.
 

robie

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I don't think the CO2 will go away on its own anytime soon.
Decanting will do the trick.

When you degassed, what was the temperature of the wine at degassing time? It needed to be above about 74 degrees F. Much below that, it will not release the CO2 easily.

During your short bulk aging time, did you have an air lock installed?

To degas, when I get to where I think I am done, I put some of the wine in a bottle and shack it well. That lets me know if it is degassed.
 

spleisher

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Well, I'm in Florida, and I don't have a cellar, so my temp. is pretty much always above 74. I know for aging a lower temperature would be more desirable, but unfortunately it's just not an option for me.

Yep, it was air-locked during secondary fermentation and my brief bulk age period.


Glad to know decanting will help. I guess I'll just leave it where it is.

Again, it's not totally fizzy or anything the way it is when it is fermenting, but there is definitely a little left.
 

robie

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I know what you mean. It wouldn't be so bad if it wasn't 30 bottles. :slp

I would like others' opinion on this but why, when no one is looking (ha!), you couldn't open the bottle, shake it pretty hard with your thumb over the opening, then remove your thumb to release the pressure and CO2. Maybe do this a couple of times. Seems it would fizz off CO2 and add a little O2 at the same time. A newly opened wine typically needs aerated, anyway.
 

jeepingchick

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so i read the title of the thread and my only thought was "hmmmmm so does my husband " :) :) :)
 

Wade E

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If its bottled then it wont go away! Just decant and even use a vacuvin on the botle if you think you still need it.
 

djrockinsteve

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I know what you mean. It wouldn't be so bad if it wasn't 30 bottles. :slp

I would like others' opinion on this but why, when no one is looking (ha!), you couldn't open the bottle, shake it pretty hard with your thumb over the opening, then remove your thumb to release the pressure and CO2. Maybe do this a couple of times. Seems it would fizz off CO2 and add a little O2 at the same time. A newly opened wine typically needs aerated, anyway.
I've had to give a bottle or two a good shake with my thumb over the opening. Just release slowly. You'll find that the wine tastes great the next day.
 
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