ideal temperature for the wine

Winemaking Talk - Winemaking Forum

Help Support Winemaking Talk - Winemaking Forum:

amandacarlson

Junior
Joined
Jan 11, 2010
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
I would like to know what you think is the ideal temperature for storing wine as well as during production (from grape to wine). What is your experience?

I am thinking of storing the wine after I have made it in the basement but I am not quite sure what to do , :? thanks so much
 

xanxer82

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 14, 2009
Messages
1,862
Reaction score
8
for storing a stable 55 to 65 deg F. is ideal. but more importantly is stability. Corks shrink and expand with temperature and humidity. Too dry means the cork shrinks and wine can leak and bacteria can get in. Too humid and the cork can grow mold and infect the wine.
For producing wine you want an area with a stable 70-75 degrees. (or you can use a brew belt) for primary fermentation and degassing.
 

djrockinsteve

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2010
Messages
4,911
Reaction score
144
During the early stages my wine is in the low to mid 70's. After it's cleared and is bulk aging I keep it around 55~60 degrees. Once bottled I try to maintain the low 60's.

Large temperature fluctuation is not good. Sometimes it gets pretty warm and as the temp. rises so does the wine in the carboys. Don't want it in the air lock. Small increases/decreases is okay and gradually. Just not 80 degrees today and 70 next week.
 

djrockinsteve

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2010
Messages
4,911
Reaction score
144
Storing in the basement is good. Try to find a dark or an area away from direct sunlight where there is no vibrations ( such as an air compressor, washing machines etc.)

Some of mine are on tables, some are in cabinets. You'll want a place that's easy to access and to watch your wine as it matures.
 

Green Mountains

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2009
Messages
879
Reaction score
2
My biggest problem with this is that the area of the basement I use is dedicated to wine making. I brew and store in the same room. The room in the winter keeps an average temp of 55 degrees, which is great for storage. We use a brew belt when we're in primary to keep the fermentation rolling. But we use a heater to heat the room when we want to degas.

Hopefully these fluctuations in temp will have no ill effect on our bottled wines.
 

Wade E

Premium
Joined
Jul 3, 2006
Messages
33,224
Reaction score
277
Why use a heater to heat the whole room just to degas a wine unless your degassing multiple batches?
 

phermenter

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2008
Messages
116
Reaction score
0
brew belt is great for degassing
Plenty true, but even in a 65-70 degree house, it takes me almost three hours to get a 6-gallon carboy up to 75 via Brew Belt. I usually plan on four hours to rack to Better Bottle, warm, degass and return to the storage carboy.

Jim
 

Wade E

Premium
Joined
Jul 3, 2006
Messages
33,224
Reaction score
277
It would take longer then that to heat up a carboy using room temp thats for sure. Direct heating of the carboy is much more efficient! Probably days to get 6 gallons of wine up to 75 from 55 using a room heater to heat up the room first.
 

fuzzmeister

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2009
Messages
117
Reaction score
6
Wade
How long does it usually take to heat up a carboy with a brew belt for the purpose of degassing?
 

fuzzmeister

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2009
Messages
117
Reaction score
6
Pardon me Ishould of asked what temperature do you get the wine to to degass?
 

Green Mountains

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2009
Messages
879
Reaction score
2
At least 70F to degas.

Wade, I've heard that it's dangerous to use a brew belt on a glass carboy. I've used them before but recently stopped "just in case".

Is it safe??
 

bryano

Wino in training
Joined
Oct 25, 2009
Messages
103
Reaction score
0
I use my basement which is kept at 60. I bought a cheap $6 heating pad which I use for the first week to 2 weeks of ferment and it holds a steady 69 on low setting. I spin it twice a day so as not to heat one side.
 

pittspur

Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2009
Messages
58
Reaction score
0
I have asked this question similarly in a different thread. I have been heating my small area with a space heater. I can see the usefulness of a brew belt, but have a question. I saw the following on a website selling the brew belt:

"Designed to wrap around most primary (up to 10 gallon) or secondary fermenters and carboys. Even fits the V-Vessel. Heats at a constant 75° F. Great for winter time basement brewing and wine making. The manufacturer states they should not be used on glass but our experienced brewers have had no problems with glass carboys in good condition (no cracks). Some key product notes are: The lower the belt is positioned on the fermenting container the higher the must temperature will rise. The belt should not be left plugged in for more then 8 days in a row. It should not (and really doesn't need to be) used in room temperatures above 75-80 degrees F. The must or wort temperature should be monitored daily. Do not cover the belt with a blanket or wrap it and use it away from flammable material. Works great in cool climates!"

I am mostly concerned with the mention of not using it for more than 8 days in a row. That is not long enough for fermentation through degassing. My wife is concerned about the space heater running all the time. Not sure that she would be comfortable with a heating pad plugged in all the time. Does anyone use these brew belts continuously?
 

amandacarlson

Junior
Joined
Jan 11, 2010
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
...Corks shrink and expand with temperature and humidity. Too dry means the cork shrinks and wine can leak and bacteria can get in. Too humid and the cork can grow mold and infect the wine.
For producing wine you want an area with a stable 70-75 degrees.
Great tips, good to know. It is nice to have a selection of wine to offer guests
 

xanxer82

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 14, 2009
Messages
1,862
Reaction score
8
I have asked this question similarly in a different thread. I have been heating my small area with a space heater. I can see the usefulness of a brew belt, but have a question. I saw the following on a website selling the brew belt:

"Designed to wrap around most primary (up to 10 gallon) or secondary fermenters and carboys. Even fits the V-Vessel. Heats at a constant 75° F. Great for winter time basement brewing and wine making. The manufacturer states they should not be used on glass but our experienced brewers have had no problems with glass carboys in good condition (no cracks). Some key product notes are: The lower the belt is positioned on the fermenting container the higher the must temperature will rise. The belt should not be left plugged in for more then 8 days in a row. It should not (and really doesn't need to be) used in room temperatures above 75-80 degrees F. The must or wort temperature should be monitored daily. Do not cover the belt with a blanket or wrap it and use it away from flammable material. Works great in cool climates!"

I am mostly concerned with the mention of not using it for more than 8 days in a row. That is not long enough for fermentation through degassing. My wife is concerned about the space heater running all the time. Not sure that she would be comfortable with a heating pad plugged in all the time. Does anyone use these brew belts continuously?
I plug mine in at night and unplug in the AM if the house is warm enough to keep it around 70+
 

arcticsid

Arctic Contributor
Joined
Oct 26, 2008
Messages
4,203
Reaction score
59
Okay, I've been wondering this.

We know ideally for fermenting, we like 75F or so. Once the ferment starts, if the temperature was say, to drop to like 65F, it will continue to ferment. Albeit a little slower and not so aggressive.

Some yeast can ferment at a lower temperature, and obviously it will take longer for the SG to come down where you want it before transfering.

So, the question is, is there any disadvantage to having a ferment at a lower than ideal temperature if the end result(SG) will be the same?

Troy
 

amandacarlson

Junior
Joined
Jan 11, 2010
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
ideal temperature for wine

How do professional wine producers store the wine?

At what temperature? It would be nice to ask them at a study trip or something


My profile
 

pittspur

Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2009
Messages
58
Reaction score
0
I plug mine in at night and unplug in the AM if the house is warm enough to keep it around 70+
That's what I am not sure of. Without a heater in my "brew room", it runs about 62 degrees. Would it be the right approach to unplug the brew belt every day? Will the must stay warm enough?
 
Top