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winemanden

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Hi everyone,

so my Rhubarb wine is going well but I’m having issues clearing it. The recipe I used did not call for Pectolase before fermentation so I’m guessing this is why I’m still here waiting for clarity. I’ve racked three times and the last one I added Pectolase but three weeks later I still have a misty wine. Any thing else I can do?
Photo attached shows the Rhubarb demijohn on the left hand side. Right hand side is an elderberry I made a month or so after the rhubarb. This is clearing faster.
View attachment 63901
Just out of curiosity, was that a White Elderberry, or just juice from Red Elders?
 

oxocube

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Just out of curiosity, was that a White Elderberry, or just juice from Red Elders?
I mean elderflower, sorry. I’ve also realised this is a US thread, I’m over in the UK, London 👋🏻 Hi everyone.
 

Rice_Guy

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This is a world wide thread, which just has lots of US members
I mean elderflower, sorry. I’ve also realised this is a US thread, I’m over in the UK, London 👋🏻 Hi everyone.
it is interesting learning about Brazilian juba berries and how to improvise making wine with things one finds in a musulum dominant culture and even that Korean dogwood has fermentable berries so I could plant one here in zone 5 to have flowers and something to ferment (if anyone is listening, I find Korean dogwood also collects Japanese beetles)
 

JustJoe

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I have made a number of batches of rhubarb wine as well as a lot of other wines and the rhubarb is always the slowest to clear. It takes three rackings at least before it's clear.
 

winemanden

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If it tastes OK shove it at the back of the cupboard and forget about it for a while. Time and patience are your friends in this hobby.
 

winemaker81

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I second the "get rid of the air space" advice. Air is your enemy -- a large air space can produce oxidation -- basically the same thing as rust on steel, and just as undesired.

For top up? For rhubarb and elderflower, find a good tasting but relatively neutral white wine.

Alternately, put the wine in smaller containers. I'm guessing your containers are 4 liters? Get 3 liter bottles (if you can) and put the excess wine in smaller bottles so there is no head space in them, either. [it's probably easier to use a white wine to top the jugs]

For future reference, plan your batch so that instead of 4 liters, your first racking produces 6 liters. Put the extra in smaller bottles and top up the large container after each racking.

It appears the majority of the forum membership is North American, but we have members from all around the world. I find it interesting to correspond with diverse folk.
 

winemaker81

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Speaking of top-up, I currently have 5 wines in production, batches ranging from 5 to 15 gallons. Yesterday a friend helped me rack my 55 liter barrel. In addition to needing top-up for the barrel, we had to perform quality control checks on all carboys ... e.g., tasting ....

I lacked top-up wine, as the barrel has been the biggest consumer of my excess. It's been topped up with everything else I have.

Previously I purchased a few bottles of a tasty red-blend (my wines are Merlot, Zinfandel, Malbec/Merlot/Zinfandel blend, and Pinot Noir), and used the blend to top up all containers. The barrel needed the most, the carboys needed a few ounces each.

Don't be shy about blending when required. A small amount of a compatible wine will not affect flavor that much, and it's important to maintain low head space.

Consider that Bordeaux, one of the yardsticks for wine quality, is (to the best of my knowledge) all blends.
 
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