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fermentation temperature

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Trubador

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My kit says it's OK, but I wanted to get second opinion. I am using Winexpert Selection series Merlot. Kit says fermentation temp of between 65 and 75 degrees.

I will be fermenting between 67 and 68 degrees which is my room temperature during winter months. Will this present any problems? Has anyone else actually produced a wine with these temperatures.
 
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Caplan

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If it's a stable temperature that doesn't drop below the 65 (but at the same time won't rise above the 75) you'll be fine. Fermentation may be a little slower to take off if it's cooler but you'll be great long term.:)
 

DarkStar

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Your time within the directions will be off on how many days. so just use your hydrometer to judge when to go for next step.

When you are done fermenting and at the degass stage before your add the final finings raise the temp above 70 if possible to 75. Helps greatly with driving off co2 that is in solution.
 

Trubador

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Your time within the directions will be off on how many days. so just use your hydrometer to judge when to go for next step.

When you are done fermenting and at the degass stage before your add the final finings raise the temp above 70 if possible to 75. Helps greatly with driving off co2 that is in solution.
75 degrees during the winter would be way too hot for us, plus with fuel oil at 2 bucks per gallon, a bit uneconomical....Will 69 degrees be high enough?
 
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Caplan

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Will 69 degrees be high enough?
It'll be fine! Degas it as normal and put it back under airlock to allow any further CO2 out. The cooler temp will actually help drop the yeast out of your wine faster.
 
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Davdef

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Ok, what are the negative effects of fermenting in a 50 degree garage?
 

Luc

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Ok, what are the negative effects of fermenting in a 50 degree garage?
Fermentation will be very slow due to low temperature if it will not stop at all.

Luc
 

MUMBA

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heat belt

go to home brew and get a heat belt for 5 gallon carbouy
put it around bottle anplug it in it will warm it up
 

YnYz

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Principal Fermentation Principles

I will be fermenting between 67 and 68 degrees which is my room temperature during winter months. Will this present any problems?
Except for getting the fermentation started, I think you should be more concerned with cooling your must than warming it. You are probably making a small enough amount that there should not be much of a problem, but I think it helps greatly to understand the basic chemistry.

Heat is a measurable and predictable bi-product of fermentation. For each 1° drop in Brix, must temperature rises 2.3° F. Example: a must that starts at 25° Brix will generate 57.5° F by the time it goes dry. if the starting temp of the must is 67° F, it would rise to 124.5° F — too warm for high quality and at risk of becoming "stuck".

Cooler fermentations are "slower" and take longer to complete, but result in wines with more "fresh fruit" smells and flavors and better acid balance.

A cool ambient (room) temperature will have more cooling effect on a smaller fermentation vessel than on a larger one. Shape is also a factor; the farther away the the vessel's proportions are from "cubical", in other words the greater the surface area, the greater influence the ambient temp will have.

Keep your hydrometer and thermometer handy and get your readings from as close to the physical center of your container as possible. You may even want to transfer your must to a cooler environment once fermentation becomes active.

Cheers,
TC
 
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conboss

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My room, small bedroom in my house, is kept at 68 degrees during fermentation. I get a fluctuation of 1 degree in the summer time and 2 degrees in the winter time. Hot water heat is hard to control for exact temps.
I have never had any problems with fermentation, albeit slower fermentations.
It will take, maybe, 2 days longer to get the SG to 1.010 from 1.090, to rack into the secondary. I'm not in a hurry and I think I get a better tasting wine fermenting at a lower temp.
I do keep track of the must temp as well. I pitch the yeast at 75 degrees and by the time it begins to ferment the must has reached 68 degrees.

Greg
 
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smurfe

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You will be fine. I always ferment around 65-68 degrees. Like others said. It is best to raise the temp if the must above 70 F when degassing but the fermentation will be fine at that temp.

Smurfe
 
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