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BrainEC1118

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I have used no starter no nutrients and have have measurements that if you know how to use a hydrometer have equaled to 11% to 18 % with just air locks ec1118 and sugar Always Rehydrated the yeast etc.. I am curious who else has had good luck with fast fermentation around 72-74 F in 10 days taste great but any tips would be better and I don't want to hear the let it sit longer lol Lover young wine. I was also curious if anyone else has tried after the first batch just using the same vessel and pitching a bit more yeast and sugar new juice and running it again? I am drinking it as I type this so Obviously I know it works but just wanted feed back and Nice TO meet you All!!
 
I have used no starter no nutrients and have have measurements that if you know how to use a hydrometer have equaled to 11% to 18 % with just air locks ec1118 and sugar Always Rehydrated the yeast etc.. I am curious who else has had good luck with fast fermentation around 72-74 F in 10 days taste great but any tips would be better and I don't want to hear the let it sit longer lol Lover young wine. I was also curious if anyone else has tried after the first batch just using the same vessel and pitching a bit more yeast and sugar new juice and running it again? I am drinking it as I type this so Obviously I know it works but just wanted feed back and Nice TO meet you All!!
Welcome to WMT!

What is your question?
 
ALOT of snobs say EC1118 is trash but it's Yeast that fights in the vessels you put them in Like I Posted I have been using it for years with no starter no nutrients and I have also used Turbo yeast which is a supposed NO NO lol and always rehydrated the yeast and had between 11-23% if including the turbo yeast with store bought juice so I was looking for feed back if any one else has ever pulled it off in 10 days...
 
Welcome to WMT!

Yes, EC-1118 is a workhorse, Brain. Glad we have it in our arsenal.

May I ask what kind of juice you are using? Like apple juice? Or grape concentrate?
 
ALOT of snobs say EC1118 is trash
As Paul (@sour_grapes) said, EC-1118 is a workhorse. It will ferment a rock if given the opportunity. Fast reproducing, it has the killer factor so it stomps out competition, and high ABV tolerance so it can handle most musts. It's the most common yeast used in kits as it gives beginners with no experienced help the best opportunity to achieve success on the first try, and every try.

That said, EC-1118 brings little else to the table. Other strains impart their own character to the wine, so you'll see a fair amount of discussion on WMT regarding which strain to use for a given wine. In recent years I don't use EC-1118 as my primary yeast, but always keep a couple of packets in the fridge since if I have a fermentation problem, inoculating with EC-1118 will be high on the list of solutions.

I recently started a high ABV kit, using RC-212 as the primary yeast -- the description reads: Ideal for full bodied red wines. Emphasizes fruit and spice notes, accentuates character in red grapes.

However, RC-212 has an ABV tolerance of about 16%, and this wine is in that range. The fermentation slowed down below 1.010 and I suspected it wasn't going to finish dry, so I added an EC-1118 starter to finish it up. This way I get the character I want from the RC-212 and the EC-1118 brought the ferment to completion. My notes on making an overnight yeast starter are here.

There are numerous yeast strain charts floating around the net. Download a few and look at the descriptions -- yeast is among the cheapest ways to experiment when making wine, especially as you're looking to up your game.
 
As Paul (@sour_grapes) said, EC-1118 is a workhorse. It will ferment a rock if given the opportunity. Fast reproducing, it has the killer factor so it stomps out competition, and high ABV tolerance so it can handle most musts. It's the most common yeast used in kits as it gives beginners with no experienced help the best opportunity to achieve success on the first try, and every try.

That said, EC-1118 brings little else to the table. Other strains impart their own character to the wine, so you'll see a fair amount of discussion on WMT regarding which strain to use for a given wine. In recent years I don't use EC-1118 as my primary yeast, but always keep a couple of packets in the fridge since if I have a fermentation problem, inoculating with EC-1118 will be high on the list of solutions.

I recently started a high ABV kit, using RC-212 as the primary yeast -- the description reads: Ideal for full bodied red wines. Emphasizes fruit and spice notes, accentuates character in red grapes.

However, RC-212 has an ABV tolerance of about 16%, and this wine is in that range. The fermentation slowed down below 1.010 and I suspected it wasn't going to finish dry, so I added an EC-1118 starter to finish it up. This way I get the character I want from the RC-212 and the EC-1118 brought the ferment to completion. My notes on making an overnight yeast starter are here.

There are numerous yeast strain charts floating around the net. Download a few and look at the descriptions -- yeast is among the cheapest ways to experiment when making wine, especially as you're looking to up your game.
Thanks for the lead on the yeast starter. I always stress primary fermentation, waiting for the fun to begin. I will be trying this on my next batch.
Also, thanks for RC-212/EC-1118 Kickstarter tip. RC-212 has been my go-to for a number of years, but I recently had a need for a high alcohol wash, so I used EC-1118 instead, but the flavor profile wasn't as distinctive as previous wines; more like carbonated grape juice with a kick. It's nice to know that I can have the profile I want and the ABV I need.
I'll have to do more yeast exploration.
 
As Paul (@sour_grapes) said, EC-1118 is a workhorse. It will ferment a rock if given the opportunity. Fast reproducing, it has the killer factor so it stomps out competition, and high ABV tolerance so it can handle most musts. It's the most common yeast used in kits as it gives beginners with no experienced help the best opportunity to achieve success on the first try, and every try.

That said, EC-1118 brings little else to the table. Other strains impart their own character to the wine, so you'll see a fair amount of discussion on WMT regarding which strain to use for a given wine. In recent years I don't use EC-1118 as my primary yeast, but always keep a couple of packets in the fridge since if I have a fermentation problem, inoculating with EC-1118 will be high on the list of solutions.

I recently started a high ABV kit, using RC-212 as the primary yeast -- the description reads: Ideal for full bodied red wines. Emphasizes fruit and spice notes, accentuates character in red grapes.

However, RC-212 has an ABV tolerance of about 16%, and this wine is in that range. The fermentation slowed down below 1.010 and I suspected it wasn't going to finish dry, so I added an EC-1118 starter to finish it up. This way I get the character I want from the RC-212 and the EC-1118 brought the ferment to completion. My notes on making an overnight yeast starter are here.

There are numerous yeast strain charts floating around the net. Download a few and look at the descriptions -- yeast is among the cheapest ways to experiment when making wine, especially as you're looking to up your game.
I have tried several. My most recent experiment was locally sourced juice red (grape) from a local wine vineyard instead of store bought concentrate or bottled off the shelf.. With EC1118 and Redstar classique and a bit of nono turbo yeast. and I can tell you that NOONE complained :) it did take 15 days in 72-74 F controlled but Taste Very good and no off putting smells I shall try again and share results and measurements if anyone is interested. By the way it was 22% :) and ALOT of my guest laughed when I shared how I did it (of course they were told they were drinking homemade wine ahead of time) Fun. I shall continue.
 
welcome to WMT

By drinking young wine you avoid the number one risk which is oxidation resulting in off flavors. It may still have turbidity but that is how it was done 500 years ago.
Adding sugar water tends to make a thin flavor wine. Acids and tannin are used to balance the sweet flavor of 12% alcohol.

If the customer drinking it is happy, then its good wine.
 
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