WineXpert Degassing wine questions! Please help

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BMarNJ

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Big shoutout to @joeswine who came out and tasted what I’ve got aging right now. I’ll try his suggestions for rescuing my 8 gallons of sour thin tasting cab-merlot. We tasted 4 different wines together and it was great to get another opinion and ideas from someone who has much more experience than me. Thanks Joe.
 

joeswine

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BMarNJ.
It was fun to talk to another wine maker in person and would like to do more of it in the future.
I’ve learned to blend new techniques with proven standard methods of wine making and commo sense.
Always remember it’s all subject to one’s taste and Preferences , patients in the process.
thanks for inviting me to your cellar
 

Johnd

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I’m on my fourth batch of red wine and I’ve read a book about home winemaking. The book didn’t really say too much about degassing at all and I’ve been googling a lot and really this is the only thing that confuses me at the moment: when to know when I’m done degassing. I’ve been using the Wine Xpert kits… the instructions say to agitate the wine intermittently for 10 minutes ( we use the drill attachment).. I’ve read that commercial wineries don’t degas their wine because they age them for some time before bottling. Is this step necessary for the kits because it completes the winemaking process in just 4 weeks? So we can get done with each batch faster and buy more kits? We are by no means rushing to drink our wine and have only enjoyed 4 out of 88ish bottles that we have produced so far. I basically just want to know what the best way to do this is. I’ve seen people say to put some wine in a mason jar, shake it, open it, and listen for gas’s escaping. When that doesn’t happen your done. I use a sanitized beer bottle I put my thumb over the opening then shake it for a couple of seconds and even after agitating wine for almost an hour I still hear gas’s escaping. It a perfect world I would have tons and tons of space and car boys so I can let them age in the car boys for a few months before bottling but is that the only option I have? I’m very confused on how 10 minutes can be enough when I’m still hearing gas’s escape after one hour of agitating. Which is why I feel it’s a marketing move by winexperts team to get people to just crank out kits every month. I also want to note that I consumed a glass from my first batch yesterday that I didn’t necessarily think was properly degassed. I finished that batch the end of January. Sorry an advanced for all my scattered thoughts I just want to know what to do to waste the least amount of time and produce the best wine possible with what I have to use. Please help! Lolol
I’m surprised no one else mentioned it, but if you’re bound and determined to degas your wine manually (not waiting for time), it can be accomplished easily in minutes with a vacuum pump exactly like this: 2.5 CFM Vacuum Pump
 

tmcfadden932

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I’m on my fourth batch of red wine and I’ve read a book about home winemaking. The book didn’t really say too much about degassing at all and I’ve been googling a lot and really this is the only thing that confuses me at the moment: when to know when I’m done degassing. I’ve been using the Wine Xpert kits… the instructions say to agitate the wine intermittently for 10 minutes ( we use the drill attachment).. I’ve read that commercial wineries don’t degas their wine because they age them for some time before bottling. Is this step necessary for the kits because it completes the winemaking process in just 4 weeks? So we can get done with each batch faster and buy more kits? We are by no means rushing to drink our wine and have only enjoyed 4 out of 88ish bottles that we have produced so far. I basically just want to know what the best way to do this is. I’ve seen people say to put some wine in a mason jar, shake it, open it, and listen for gas’s escaping. When that doesn’t happen your done. I use a sanitized beer bottle I put my thumb over the opening then shake it for a couple of seconds and even after agitating wine for almost an hour I still hear gas’s escaping. It a perfect world I would have tons and tons of space and car boys so I can let them age in the car boys for a few months before bottling but is that the only option I have? I’m very confused on how 10 minutes can be enough when I’m still hearing gas’s escape after one hour of agitating. Which is why I feel it’s a marketing move by winexperts team to get people to just crank out kits every month. I also want to note that I consumed a glass from my first batch yesterday that I didn’t necessarily think was properly degassed. I finished that batch the end of January. Sorry an advanced for all my scattered thoughts I just want to know what to do to waste the least amount of time and produce the best wine possible with what I have to use. Please help! Lolol
Like most of us that started in this hobby, we want to drink what we make as soon as it goes in the bottle. Over the years, I have had the luxury of making large enough batches that have to stay in the tank for longer periods of time and then in the bottle for years.
I use FlexTanks that are gas permeable like a 3 year old oak barrel but much easier to clean and add oak cubes to flavor if needed. Allowing the wine to mature in a container, that allows a very small of oxygen in, lets the chemistry take place that gives a good wine it's character. Then aging in the bottle adds to the flavor profile. This is why the larger wineries allow the de-gassing to take place on it own.

I have entered wines at the Orange County Ca. home wine competition soon after bottling and taken Silver awards and then again years later and taking double gold with the same wine. Patience has it's rewards.

The only wines that I de-gas are my rose', which are made to consume the following summer. My favorites are Aglianico and Montepulciano, two Italian varietals for rose'.
 
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GretchenR

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I notice that I degas for 1 minute (30 seconds in each direction) and the wine is fully degassed within another 2 to 3 weeks. I use a drill-mounted stirring rod with a pair of plastic free moving arms, and don't "whip" the wine.

I'm not arguing with your results, but I am wondering what the difference is?
Maybe the difference is the temperature. The warmer the wine, the more easily it releases its CO2. Just a thought.
 

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