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Paulietivo

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@sour_grapes I feel your pain. I also lost my father in law last Friday 8/14/20 to a sudden heart attack. He was only 66 and had just retired from Amtrak after 30 years. Steve was allergic to most things red like cherries so he mostly enjoyed chardonnay. He influenced my winemaking because I started making whites so he could enjoy them with us. He was meticulous with everything he did. His garden had blueprints measured to scale and had just hand built 3 arbors for his garden, ours and his sons. I am going to put a picture of his garden as my chardonnay label and call it 3 Arbors in his memory. Salute!
 

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sour_grapes

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So sorry, Paulie. You lost him way too young. I wish you and your wife's family peace.

Non excidet!
 

RichardC

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In my country, the ministry of health has been doing as good a job as they can, and recently we've moved into the 'community spread' phase. I am however completely baffled by their recent trend of continuing to recommend that people cough or sneeze into a tissue or the crook of their elbow. One flyer said NOT TO cough or sneeze into a mask.. SERIOUSLY?? with recommendations like that, I'm properly scared now.
 

BernardSmith

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In my country, the ministry of health has been doing as good a job as they can, and recently we've moved into the 'community spread' phase. I am however completely baffled by their recent trend of continuing to recommend that people cough or sneeze into a tissue or the crook of their elbow. One flyer said NOT TO cough or sneeze into a mask.. SERIOUSLY?? with recommendations like that, I'm properly scared now.
I suspect that virus dimensions are such that for most masks the fibers will allow any and all viruses in a sneeze (or hard cough) to be expelled through the mask so it may not be so silly to suggest that folk sneeze and cough into the sleeve at their upper arm. The cloth and arm might capture much of the viral material.
That doesn't mean that masks don't help protect both the wearer and those the wearer comes into contact with. Normal inhaling and exhaling through the mask will not have the explosive force a sneeze or cough has and while the fibers don't form a net small enough to capture virus material the net they do form is likely to prevent enough virus from being expelled into the surrounding environment through normal breathing, which is precisely what the facial barrier is supposed to do - together with inhibiting the wearer from touching their nose or mouth and so introducing viral material to exactly the locations this virus needs if it is to access lungs and reproduce.
 

DizzyIzzy

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@sour_grapes I feel your pain. I also lost my father in law last Friday 8/14/20 to a sudden heart attack. He was only 66 and had just retired from Amtrak after 30 years. Steve was allergic to most things red like cherries so he mostly enjoyed chardonnay. He influenced my winemaking because I started making whites so he could enjoy them with us. He was meticulous with everything he did. His garden had blueprints measured to scale and had just hand built 3 arbors for his garden, ours and his sons. I am going to put a picture of his garden as my chardonnay label and call it 3 Arbors in his memory. Salute!
[/QUOT
Sorry for your loss. Your label will make a lovely tribute to the man.......................................Dizzy
 

DizzyIzzy

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In my country, the ministry of health has been doing as good a job as they can, and recently we've moved into the 'community spread' phase. I am however completely baffled by their recent trend of continuing to recommend that people cough or sneeze into a tissue or the crook of their elbow. One flyer said NOT TO cough or sneeze into a mask.. SERIOUSLY?? with recommendations like that, I'm properly scared now.
What country do you live in?......................................Dizzy
 

RichardC

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Dizzy, Caribbean: Trinidad and Tobago ( one country, two islands) We have only started community spread a couple weeks now, so the lag time had people very complacent and as with most populations, there is a wide range of 'compliance to common sense' so we may be paying the price now.

Bernard, I understand your point a little, and it would make a little more sense if long sleeves were common, and the ministry specified to remove mask for sneezes only, which tend to be 'wetter' and more powerful, than coughs.
I sneezed and coughed down the neck of my t-shirt pre covid, which to me, provides a much larger surface to catch particles, and does not itself come into contact with other people or surfaces.

With a mask on. Most instinctive responses to irritation is consciously surppressed. Haha.
 

joeswine

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none of it makes any sense to me you're right if you're wrong is wrong if you're right they still don't know what they're doing.
 

Kraffty

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It's been a while since seeing a post here, I suppose we're all becoming a bit complacent, I know I'm not as careful as I was a month or two ago. I'm thinking the rising numbers after a few months of success at lowering them proves that point. Anyway we've been out and about and sightseeing over the past week, wearing our masks and trying to use common sense the whole time and I just wanted to share a pic and some brief history about a building we visited up in Jerome. It's called the Liberty Movie Theatre and was built in 1918. It wasn't opened until 1919 due to the Spanish Flu Epidemic. When it finally opened it was incredibly successful, even paid for itself in one year. While it closed as a movie theater in 1929 because the owners didn't want to invest in sound equipment for the modern Talkies the building is still standing and has served a number if different functions over the years. I guess that's just a really long way of saying we'll eventually make it through this and get back to a normal life, in the mean time try to stay diligent.LibertyTheater1.jpg
 

1d10t

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The number of active cases per 100K doesn't sound scary. Then you see the toll it is taking on hospital workers and the families of those that did suffer the worst of it. People still in financial distress. When you are fortunate enough that it hasn't encroached closely into YOUR life past the stage of inconvenience, you are truly fortunate.
 

ZebraB

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On the lighter side..... SNL last Saturday had a skit on the social aspect of Covid. It is funny and is not political


 

Rice_Guy

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COVID is getting personal
* the brother in law tested positive a week back, he has fever but mostly OK
* his wife came in positive three days after
* the nephew (19 year old) feels fine,,, and continues to go to work,,, and pal with his girl friend,,, and live with his parents,,, BUT doesn’t want to get tested

and the wife wonders how to do Thanksgiving for all 28 of the family?
 

joeswine

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I've been to Jerome need artistic community, really
Up there in the montains of Arizona.
 

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