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Chilean Sauvignon Blanc numbers ok?

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zadvocate

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Do these numbers seem ok?

PH 3.6
TA 6.3
So2 18
Brix 21.5

PH seems a little high but I think I might just leave it alone. I can add some Tartaric after fermentation.
 

Johnd

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Do these numbers seem ok?

PH 3.6
TA 6.3
So2 18
Brix 21.5

PH seems a little high but I think I might just leave it alone. I can add some Tartaric after fermentation.
I'm ok with the BRIX, but for me, SB is a more acidic, crisp wine, and I'd be dropping the pH down prior to pitching yeast, at least into the 3.3's, but that's me.
 

ibglowin

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I add tartaric all the time post fermentation (on white wines) without issues. No guesswork that way hoping you didn't add too much (upfront) and end up with too low a pH.
 

Johnd

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I add tartaric all the time post fermentation (on white wines) without issues. No guesswork that way hoping you didn't add too much (upfront) and end up with too low a pH.
Agreed, and I have done the same, but when you're that high above what a varietal is best at in the end, wouldn't you agree that getting down into the general range prefermentation is a better practice, making smaller adjustments to the final pH in the finishing stages?
 

ibglowin

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First thing I see is that TA seems sorta high for that pH. I have had several wines that I added acid upfront got it to ~3.6 (pH) and then fermented to dry and it ended up with a pH of 3.4 and this was a red wine, so then your MLF won''t go and your adding carbonate to drop acid. I learned a lesson the hard way on that one. Be careful adding acid upfront. You never can tell exactly where you will end up with post fermentation.
 

zadvocate

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I agree i will wait. I have reacted before preferment and regretted it. I haven't added anything now because the juice was cold and I'm not 100% sure that my pH is totally accurate. Thanks for the input. I appreciate it.
 

Johnd

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@zadvocate , I never disagree just to do so, I believe adjustment of this particular white varietal, given your numbers, since you won't be conducting MLF, is best done prefermentation, but it's yours, and you may do as you like. My belief is that adjusting now will yield a better, more well integrated wine in the end. Please take the time to read the attached article:

https://winemakermag.com/1013-creating-a-balanced-must

Your numbers are nice for a red wine must, not a sauvignon blanc. Whichever way you decide to go, I hope it works out for the best!!
 

zadvocate

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Thanks John. I made a bucket of Rose a few months ago and after measuring I added acid based on my Preferment numbers. As it turned out I must have measured wrong and I had to add potassium bicarbonate to get the acid out. So right now I'm a little skittish about adding pre-fermentation specially to this juice bucket which is supposed to be already balanced. I do appreciate you input and I intend to adjust my must next week with my grapes.

I have another question. I am trying to keep the fermentation temperature in the low 60s. I pitched my yeast Thursday night and it looks like and there is a smell of activity, but the brick levelbis the same, has not really changed much at all. I know that it is early on but should I raise the temperature to get the fermentation started then lower it?
 
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Johnd

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Thanks John. I appreciate you input.
I have another question. I am trying to keep the fermentation temperature in the low 60s. I pitched my yeast Thursday night and it looks like and there is a smell of activity, but the brick levelbis the same, has not really changed much at all. I know that it is early on but should I raise the temperature to get the fermentation started then lower it?
I'm currently fermenting two carboys of Chardonnay and two of Pinot Gris in my wine room at 60F. Took a few days to get going, and I pitched last Saturday, so I'd say Just give it some time.
 

Floandgary

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Thanks John. I made a bucket of Rose a few months ago and after measuring I added acid based on my Preferment numbers. As it turned out I must have measured wrong and I had to add potassium bicarbonate to get the acid out. So right now I'm a little skittish about adding pre-fermentation specially to this juice bucket which is supposed to be already balanced. I do appreciate you input and I intend to adjust my must next week with my grapes.

I have another question. I am trying to keep the fermentation temperature in the low 60s. I pitched my yeast Thursday night and it looks like and there is a smell of activity, but the brick levelbis the same, has not really changed much at all. I know that it is early on but should I raise the temperature to get the fermentation started then lower it?
Most all readings advocate cooler ferment temps for whites in order to extract the particular flavors. In reality it is a test of patience!!! With reds you can be accustomed to seeing ferment activity rather quickly and with some vigor (if in a cooler workspace you will usually be applying some heat). Unheated whites can take a few days to get going and progress will be somewhat slower ,, ergo the patience :db And BTW ,, a lot depends on the yeast you've chosen
 
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zadvocate

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I'm fermenting in a 7.5 gallon bucket and wondering if I should put it in a carboy? It would be harder for me to keep it cool but would protect it from oxygenation. I'm thinking I will transfer as it progresses but before it finishes fermenting.
 

JohnT

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Pictures or it never happened...
 

zadvocate

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I'll take some pictures. Brixs are down to 13. I have been trying to keep the temperature at 64° by adding iced water bottles. It's worked pretty well except by the time I wake up in the morning or get home from work the temperature is up to 68. Should I transfer it to a carboy soon?
 

zadvocate

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My PH now is 3.28. I measured with two PH meters, one of which is brand new and two different sets of chemicals. This was a juice bucket and I am wondering why the measurements were so off? The original PH that I measured was 3.6. This could have been based upon the tempature of the must which if it was say 50 degrees the real PH would be 3.45. I dont know what the temp was when I measured. I have to look in my note book.
Even so would you expect the PH to fall due to fermentation?
 

Boatboy24

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Was there any CO2 in the must when you measured the pH?
 

Redbird1

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View attachment 35791 was at 68° this morning added three ice bottles now it's down to 60. Brix at 12
If you have the means, I would suggest an "ice bath" for the whole bucket. I just put the whole bucket in a big plastic tote filled most of the way with water. I cycle out frozen water bottles. This method prevents big temperature swings as it takes a long time to heat/cool a large volume of water as opposed to just the volume of the must.
 

Johnd

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My PH now is 3.28. I measured with two PH meters, one of which is brand new and two different sets of chemicals. This was a juice bucket and I am wondering why the measurements were so off? The original PH that I measured was 3.6. This could have been based upon the tempature of the must which if it was say 50 degrees the real PH would be 3.45. I dont know what the temp was when I measured. I have to look in my note book.
Even so would you expect the PH to fall due to fermentation?
If you current reading is correct, that's a pretty substantial drop. Did you thoroughly degas the sample that you measured? While I can't say that it's out of line, I will say that I've never seen a change that substantial in any wine that I've made, and my pH's normally increase through AF, not decrease.

I'm suspecting, as you alluded in a couple of places in your thread, that your initial pH reading may have been off, @ibglowin noted that the pH was pretty high for the TA you measured. There's no way to know for sure now, but if I were betting, my money would be on an initial reading that was off.
 

zadvocate

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I have not degassed other than racking with the all-in-one one time. I just bought the millwaukee pH meter and when I first tested wine, it tells you that you must wait for the hourglass to disappear and then take that reading. When I did it the hour glass stopped at 3.4 however the pH reading continued to drop to 3.28. I assume the reading of 3.28 is the correct one.
 

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