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Norsebor

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Hey Guys/ Girls,

I wanted to make wine for the first time ever this year with a crop of scuffies that I had grown. Here's my problem (Or not) when I finally got around to it, the scuffies in my refrigerator have already started to get mold on them and started to rot. Since that essentially what you do anyway, will they be okay or are they ruined? I know that this is a stupid question but I'm totally clueless.

Thanks

John
 

Wade E

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I would not try that, wine making doesnt take it into rotting and molding. I would not want you or anyone else to get violently sick. What the heck are scuffies anyway?
 

VineRipe

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I would not try that, wine making doesnt take it into rotting and molding. I would not want you or anyone else to get violently sick. What the heck are scuffies anyway?
I know *I* try to make sure my roadkill is fresh before I throw it on the smoker too, Wade. New as I am, I don't think any amount of experience would entice me to try to make anything edible out of something rotting and growing mold.

Heck, I don't even trust them stinky-feet cheeses for that reason! lol

I'm guessing "scuffies" would be scupernongs?

We have two huge bushes behind our house that we have trained into nice little jelly juice providers, and what with this newfound hobby, I'm thinking they might just find their way to other uses...


I just have to rassle the wife first. Tis okay - I used to enjoy rasslin' the wife. Of course, I *AM* older now...
 

smurfe

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You really need fresh viable fruit to make a good wine. Fruit doesn't really rot during fermentation and if you do get some mold you didn't do your job by punching the cap every day. Best thing to do for fruit for winemaking is to freeze it right at the peak of ripeness for a couple weeks or longer till needed. Won't have that rotting problem then and it actually helps extract more juice from the fruit.
 

VineRipe

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Hey, smurfe!

We's dang nigh ree-lated, I reckon. I'm on the edge of de swamp in SW Mississippi just north of the Louisiana border.

And yep to that frozen thingie. I have a gallon of blueberry that is nearly ready for bottling. It was my first attempt, and golly, I wish I had known enough about what I was doing then to have had all my equipment together, take readings, write them down, etc., etc., etc...

Alas, I just followed the directions as best I could in a most primitive fashion using frozen blueberries from our bushes (the ones the deer haven't eaten to the ground anyway) and hoped for the best.

I've never been a wine drinker, but did have to entertain customers on a regular enough basis that I at least got familiar with some different tastes with meals, and can honestly say that NO wine any of those customers ever ordered on *my* expense report ever tasted as good as this blueberry does. As you might expect, being as they were ordering on someone else's expense account, the wines they requested were far from the the cheap stuff.

I can't wait till the first full year of aging tells exactly what this wine is going to be.
 

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