wine to strong

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zpablo

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Wine almost to strong to drink. What can I do to tone it down a bit?
 

arcticsid

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mix it with a lil bit of a store bought wine. or, hold your nose, drink it, and remember the first one is always a doozie. How strong is it ZP? Tell us a bit more. You were afterall brewing alcohol. Sounds like you may have made it a lil stronger than you intended.

Troy
 

zpablo

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mix it with a lil bit of a store bought wine. or, hold your nose, drink it, and remember the first one is always a doozie. How strong is it ZP? Tell us a bit more. You were afterall brewing alcohol. Sounds like you may have made it a lil stronger than you intended.

Troy
I have made two batches. i started them a week apart. the first batch which i bottled last week seamed OK. I used about the same amount of sugar in both batches. i did add more yeast in the middle of the second batch, and used a blender on the grapes instead of crushing them by hand. the alcohol content overpowers the wine taste. made with grapes from my back yard.
 

MN-winer

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Adding more yeast won't get you higher alcohol. Did you measure the specific gravity? Its possible one batch of grapes had more sugar content and if you added the same amount of sugar then it may have had such a high SG that you turned it to rocket fuel.

I agree with others. More info needed.
 

smurfe

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Yeah, we need some specifics such as the starting gravity and exactly "about" how much sugar your used. Could you post your step by step process? In the end though, to make it pleasant you are probably going to need to blend it with a low alcohol wine.
 

waynemart

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Using the blender probably explains your taste problems. Grape seeds add bitterness. Grind them into the must and you add a lot of acidity. The only suggestion I can think of at this late time is to try a malolatic fermentation. If you haven't already added a lot of sulfites, it should take most of the acidity out. Don't expect anything to happen overnight. Malolatic fermentation can go on for months after you add the bugs.
 

zpablo

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Adding more yeast won't get you higher alcohol. Did you measure the specific gravity? Its possible one batch of grapes had more sugar content and if you added the same amount of sugar then it may have had such a high SG that you turned it to rocket fuel.

I agree with others. More info needed.
When the term beginner is used it is an exatration in my case. The last 24 hours have seen my knowledge of wine making multiply by the power of 100. I feel am wasting your time with these question now I know a bit more. My wine making tools are a couple of 5 gallon buckets. Specific gravity, have no idea. I ordered a dozen wine bottles online and some #9 corks and now I see the problem i will have trying to get the corks in the bottles. thanks for help. If i try this again and i think i will more advice will be requested. thanks again
zack
 

St Allie

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Zack,

Welcome to the forum.

We do get a lot of similar questions to yours.. and we always ask for that little bit more information.. We're always happy to help darl..

Keep those questions coming..that's what we are here for.

Allie
 

zpablo

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Using the blender probably explains your taste problems. Grape seeds add bitterness. Grind them into the must and you add a lot of acidity. The only suggestion I can think of at this late time is to try a malolatic fermentation. If you haven't already added a lot of sulfites, it should take most of the acidity out. Don't expect anything to happen overnight. Malolatic fermentation can go on for months after you add the bugs.
I started making this wine after my brother-in-law brought be a few bottles of wine he had made. He make his first batch of wine at the age of 10. He has generaly made it from what ever he found in the wild. His wind making kit was a 5 gallon bucket. The wine would not win any contest but it was fairly smooth. What I have made is Rocket Fuel. I put more info on another post earlier. thanks for the assistance
zack
 

zpablo

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Adding more yeast won't get you higher alcohol. Did you measure the specific gravity? Its possible one batch of grapes had more sugar content and if you added the same amount of sugar then it may have had such a high SG that you turned it to rocket fuel.

I agree with others. More info needed.
If you see the reply to some of the others that offered help I spelled out what i think explains the problem. I am an idot. I am like obama playing pres. I have no idea what I am doing but an learning more every day. thanks for the reply I will try again
zack
 

arcticsid

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Zack, ask away, we are all happy to help. Noone in here made any of this stuff up, we all learned from asking questions and from knowledge gained from others who have went before us.

There are absolutely no dumb or redundant questions in here. Everyone wants to see everyone else be successful in brewing their own.!!!

Theres alot of info in here and it can be almost overwhelming and somewhat intimidating. Don't sweat it. When I first came here I spent two days reading every post in here. On the 3rd day, I was back in here asking alot of the same questions most beginers have.

Have fun in your new hobby, please don't hesitate to inquire about your concerns or ask what you would like to know.


Troy
 

waynemart

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Zack,

Just remember that anything with sugar in it wants to become wine on its own whether our not you do anything to it. I've experimented with everything from Kiwi fruit to watermellon. Some would gag a maggott at bottling time. Here are the main things I learned from my mistakes:

1. Don't get into a hurry to bottle. Leave it in a carboy for at least six months. A year is even better.

2. Rack at least once each month, leaving the junk behind. Put a campden tablet each time if you have a 6 gallon carboy.

3. Keep as little air in the top of your carboy as possible. You are going to leave some behind with each racking. When topping off, try to use a similar wine or similar juice. Avoid using water.

4. No matter how bad it taste at bottling time, if it is clear go ahead and bottle it. Wait at least a year to open one. You'll be surprised how better it gets with age.
 

non-grapenut

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Make Sangria!

Wine almost to strong to drink. What can I do to tone it down a bit?
Want the quickest fix? Mix it with fresh citrus juice and cut fruits and make sangria. Get jiggy with it and add lemon-lime soda or giner ale, serve on ice. Store the rest in the fridge in milk jugs. Invite friends/family over for a sangria party. Yea! Can I come?
 

zpablo

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Zack,

Just remember that anything with sugar in it wants to become wine on its own whether our not you do anything to it. I've experimented with everything from Kiwi fruit to watermellon. Some would gag a maggott at bottling time. Here are the main things I learned from my mistakes:

1. Don't get into a hurry to bottle. Leave it in a carboy for at least six months. A year is even better.

2. Rack at least once each month, leaving the junk behind. Put a campden tablet each time if you have a 6 gallon carboy.

3. Keep as little air in the top of your carboy as possible. You are going to leave some behind with each racking. When topping off, try to use a similar wine or similar juice. Avoid using water.

4. No matter how bad it taste at bottling time, if it is clear go ahead and bottle it. Wait at least a year to open one. You'll be surprised how better it gets with age.
My wine making stuff in limited to 2 five gallon buckets. I am learning more and more all the time. I guess you could say I have racked it once. The second batch is rocket fuel. I will try again soon when i get time and a plan for the next try. Where can I get one of these things called a Carboy?
thanks
zack
 

waynemart

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My wine making stuff in limited to 2 five gallon buckets. I am learning more and more all the time. I guess you could say I have racked it once. The second batch is rocket fuel. I will try again soon when i get time and a plan for the next try. Where can I get one of these things called a Carboy?
thanks
zack
I ferment mine in Home Depot buckets. Keep an eye open on Craigslist for used carboys. Wives are usually selling them off after their husbands drank themselves to death. A new six gallon glass carboy is really expensive on-line or at the local home brew shops. The Ozarka water bottles do well, but many experts advise staying away from plastic. I haven't noticed any difference in the taste, though. Don't forget the air lock. They are fairly cheap on line. Make sure you get the right stopper to fit whatever you use for a carboy.
 

arcticsid

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Z, shop around online. There are LOTS of places for supplies etc. Who to buy from is almost a discussion in itself. Just for something to look at take a look at www.midwestsupplies.com They are definitely not the only game in town!, but it will give you a little idea on whats out there. Glass carboys are pretty spendy, plus shipping them.

Consider the Better Bottle brand, they are plastic, but a type of plastic that won't be affected from the acids and alcohol in wine or beer. www.better-bottle.com This is the manufactures website, but almost any supply source will carry them. I just bought 2 3 gallon bottles for $15 a piece. The store made me a deal but they only run about 20 each, glass you will pay close to thirty.

I too ferment in a Home Depot bucket, sort of. Thats why I went with 3 gallon size "carboys". Then I can ferment 4 gallons or so and still have a container to rack it into and put the excess in a gallon container for topping off or "testing" LOL.

Plus I live in a small cabin so room is an issue. The better bottles are square, first of all, and, a whole lot easier to handle. Its my first go with them, so I am not making a sales pitch. But I have heard lots of good things about them and it may be something for you to consider.

Airlocks ARE cheap, but if you had to, and I have, many times. Run a tube through the cab and send it into a jar of sanitized water. It can burp, but can't burp back. Called a blow by tube. Otheres have used them, same effect.

The whole brew it yourself thing doesn't have to be expensive. But having the right equipment sure makes it alot easier. Besides, aside from your juices and additives, EVERYTHING else is reusable, so consider it an investment. LOL, right, and don't let the wife know how much your really spending on it, unless she's a wine drinker herself!!

Take Care, Good Luck

Troy
 

Hillbilly Bill

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Zack,
There is a book called The Alaskan Bootlegger's Bible. In it the author, Leon Kania, tell some funny and interesting stories about old time wine, beer, and liquor making episodes. There is at least one detailed chapter on each type of alcohol drink and more info than you ever expected in such a small book (173 pp including the index). It is a great book to read whether you intend to continue in the hobby or not.
One story he tells is about an old woman who makes her wine in a 5 gallon bucket (as I do). She had no hydrometer, thermometer, or even an airlock... yet she made good wine year in and year out. It is easy. The book is great. Get a copy.
Good luck and Happy Holidays.
Bill
 

arcticsid

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Glad you refered to hi book Bill. He's my neighbor, of sorts. Lot of good info in there, as well as alot of other books. But I think his book is close to the ole book about "growing your own tea"

Do whats right, try what hasn't been tried, listen to those who have done both, and you will probably come up with something in the middle! LOL

Troy
 

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