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What kind of yeast?

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whine4wine

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I am making some more apple wine. Most of the recipes I found suggest champagne yeast.
I'm using Lalvin, I have used EC1118, But also have some K1-V1116 and 71B-1122.
What are the differences between these yeasts. What makes one more suitable that the other.
 

Tom

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1118 = all purpose wine yeast
1116 = Good for wine made from grapes and fruit
1122 = Good for wines looking for fruity aroma

I like Cote des Blancs for fruit wines.
Look here ..
http://www.winemakingtalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3554
I sent this to Smurfe to post. All the info you need on wine yeast.
Enjoy..
 

smurfe

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EC118 is Champagne yeast and what I use more than anything. Particularly white wines.
 

Malkore

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I have made an apfelwein using red star montrachet. turned out good. its not what the recipe called for but its the closest the LHBS had in-stock.
 

Stu

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Champagne yeasts are great for their flocculation and nice flavors they give off during autolysis (the process of yeast decomposition during sur lie aging).

I believe Pris de Mousse (PDM) is genetically identical to EC1118, and substantially cheaper when I last checked... either one is a great choice.
 

mmadmikes1

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I am amazed at how the cost of yeast is a factor, I pay 99 cents for a package of 1118 or 1122 and 89 cents for red star Champagne yeast. It cant be that much more in California. O-ya these are Canadian price because my closest LBS is in Canada
BTW any of the yeast will work out well. I just used 1122 for Chardonnay and it left nice fruity taste, I was after that. I have used all the yeast you listed with good results. Make a couple batches using different yeast and see what you like the best. In the end it is what you end up preferring. Taste is a personal thing and I have yet to make a wine everyone think is great
 
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Wade E

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Id go with the Champagne or Coted Des Blanc. For anone thinking if using Montrachet supply that bacth with both nutrient and energizer or you will mostly end up with H2S problem.
 

dderemiah

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Is that the subtle gym sock smell? I have a applewine that I used Montrechet on and it had the "Rhino farts" during the first part of the ferment and now (3 months later) it has a subtle off smell to it. Will age make it lose that or will it always have that?
 

St Allie

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Is that the subtle gym sock smell? I have a applewine that I used Montrechet on and it had the "Rhino farts" during the first part of the ferment and now (3 months later) it has a subtle off smell to it. Will age make it lose that or will it always have that?
it's a smell of sulphur (sulfur.. US spelling) a vigorous splash racking will get rid of it for you if it's just a slight taint. Do it before you bottle it.. or you won't get rid of it.

Allie
 

dderemiah

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will it work to take a small sample and try splashing it around to see if it will work?
 

Stu

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Splashing stinky wine without a simultaneous copper addition can encourage the development of disulfides that tend to smell even worse.

Splashing the wine alone oxides H2S and mono-mercaptans that can form disulfides which are more chemically inernt that mono-mercaptans or H2S.

If you're not sure which you have, you can put a shiny penny in a glass of wine and swirl, you should notice a decrease in the stink almost immediately.

If you don't notice a change, you probably have disulfides and you'll need to either treat the wine with Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) followed by Copper, or just drink the wine when you have a cold and can't smell it. ;)

A 25 ppm Ascorbic acid addition will reverse the disulfide formation so that your Copper can do the trick.... you should wait 24 hours for the Ascorbic to do its work before adding the copper.

Copper can be added as Copper Sulfate or by collecting shiny pennies or a copper pot scrubber (looks like copper steel wool.) Adding metallic copper means you won't know how much you're actually adding, but not a concern if you're not making commercial wine or not leaving the copper in contact with the wine for long periods of time.

Nutrient additions are the best prevention for off-aromas, but not fool-proof.
 

dderemiah

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Turns out the splash rack did the trick. Science at work. Thanks guys. I'll be bottling this stuff up soon. I'm impressed with the quality of this wine after 3 months it is a nice light white-ish wine. SO digs it which is cool 'cause she doesn't normally like wine :)
 

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