Salt to counter-act bitterness?

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Raptor99

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I saw this today: US scientist recommends adding salt to make perfect cup of tea If a pinch of salt can counter-act bitterness in tea, I wonder if it would work in wine as well? From the article, it sounds like they used only a pinch of salt, an undetectable amount in the flavor.

The Romans added some sea water to some of their wines: Drink Wine Like the Romans, With a Pinch of Salt. A California winemaker recommends adding a pinch of salt to your red wine: Why You Should Be Adding Salt To Your Glass of Red Wine

Has anyone tried a tiny bit of salt in their wine?
 
I saw this today: US scientist recommends adding salt to make perfect cup of tea If a pinch of salt can counter-act bitterness in tea, I wonder if it would work in wine as well? From the article, it sounds like they used only a pinch of salt, an undetectable amount in the flavor.

The Romans added some sea water to some of their wines: Drink Wine Like the Romans, With a Pinch of Salt. A California winemaker recommends adding a pinch of salt to your red wine: Why You Should Be Adding Salt To Your Glass of Red Wine

Has anyone tried a tiny bit of salt in their wine?
I have never tried putting salt into my wines for any reason but I will say this. At a wine tasting, I have sipped a red wine, noting its flavor profile and then eaten a piece of Pecorino Romano (which is salty) and tasted the wine again. The difference is remarkable! I recommend your trying it.

There might be something to salt in wine but I am too old a dog to try new tricks.
 
I have never tried putting salt into my wines for any reason but I will say this. At a wine tasting, I have sipped a red wine, noting its flavor profile and then eaten a piece of Pecorino Romano (which is salty) and tasted the wine again. The difference is remarkable! I recommend your trying it.

There might be something to salt in wine but I am too old a dog to try new tricks.
Do not be afraid, never be too old to learn! Life is short! I'm sure you can manage1/2 a glass of your wine.;)
 
There might be something to salt in wine but I am too old a dog to try new tricks.
Bull@^*%. You can do anything you set your mind to. Within reason. Jumping off the roof while flapping your arms will not end well. ;)

Try this -- I buy large green olives stuffed with bleu cheese or provolone, both are salty. Both go very well with red wine, which lends credence to the idea of salt + wine potentially making an improvement.
 
Okay. I'll fess up. I tried a pinch in a glass of my 2023 Chelois that still has a touch of bitterness. The first 3 grains did nothing. A few more grains made it less bitter but I could detect the salt. More experimentation is necessary to determine amount. Easier fix, eat the salty cheese or olives. Try an olive in the wine like a cocktail.
 
Okay. I'll fess up. I tried a pinch in a glass of my 2023 Chelois that still has a touch of bitterness. The first 3 grains did nothing. A few more grains made it less bitter but I could detect the salt. More experimentation is necessary to determine amount. Easier fix, eat the salty cheese or olives. Try an olive in the wine like a cocktail.
This is among the reasons I love this forum -- great feedback!

This is an interesting conundrum. I'd not put the olive in the wine as it might change it too much. Taking a sip of wine while chewing the olive is one thing, the next sip in the salty residue in my mouth is another. Both potentially positive or negative.

Something to think about.
 
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If a pinch of salt can counter-act bitterness ,, wonder if it would work in wine as well? ,,,, Has anyone tried a tiny bit of salt in their wine?
* this does work with bitter apples in hard cider. Sodium blocks taste receptors ,,, yup “hard tannin “ taste will be modified,, soft tannins/ astringent will not be modified, the soft tannins expression is a function of TA, acid recognition by the tongue.
* from a food formulation point of view I suggest going for foods that pair well. Serve a salty with a bitter rather than doctoring the whole carboy. The hard tannins will complex with each other creating astringent smooth tannins and after years drop out of solution. The salty note would be all that is left then.
* salt is used in some foods as baby food to modify metallic taste. The infant hasn’t developed preferences so it is really tweaking the flavor for moms that sample the product.
 
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I guess there is a reason that wine is often served with cheese!

Serve a salty with a bitter rather than doctoring the whole carboy. The hard tannins will complex with each other creating astringent smooth tannins and after years drop out of solution. The salty note would be all that is left then.
This is a good point, at least if you anticipate aging some of your wine for several years.
 

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