pH reading variation based on liquid temperature

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geek

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What's the expected variation, if any, that the pH in the liquid will vary based on its temperature?

And what is the "safe zone" average temperature for an accurate pH reading?
I assume the colder the temp the higher the pH reading, correct?
 

ibglowin

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Almost all pH meters these days are temperature correcting. Maybe the real cheapo ones that are $35 are not but then I wouldn't trust the number enough to even worry about temperature correction!
 

geek

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I have a Milwaukee ph56 with new probe.
Liquid at 32F and is reading a pH of 3.9x
 

Tnuscan

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Maybe warm a sample to 68deg and test.?
 
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Johny99

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Your meter should have a temp correction chart, and more importantly, an operating range. I have one with atc, but it is only good near room temp. I'd warm it to 60F or so as Dave says.

If your meter doesn't have a correction scale, there are a bunch on the web, of course.

Don't know how accurate, but here is one.

https://www.hamzasreef.com/Contents/Calculators/PhTempCorrection.php
 

geek

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Yeah, found that online calculator yesterday, thanks.
 

Hoxviii

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pH doesn't fluctuate enough in fermentation temperature ranges to really worry about. Your pH meter or litmus paper would have to be .001 pH accurate with 0.00 precision to matter - you aren't getting that with anything less than lab grade equipment.

pH test, do a gross adjustment to where your yeast is happy, then titrate for a fine correction.
 
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